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Hiqh School AHiMe 



duPONT MANUAL HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION— 1959 





^Opt:%^ wa^.,, 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Campbell, Greer, Hambrick, Atwell, Marr, 
Melear, Eddleman, Rice, Mantell, Carroll, Coach Kimmel. Second Row: 
Mgr. Thompson, Thompson, Suhr, Watson, Murphy, Linville, Lane, Nelson, 
Ferriell, Williams, Clark, Brown. 




Oificial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
AUGUST - 135a 



/ 



ff 




Kentucky High School Track Meet 

Lexinq+on, Kentucky, May 22-23, 1959 

Highlands High School Track Team—K.H.S.A.A. Champion 1959 




(Left to Right) Front 1! 
Hall, Ross, Capt. Sprou 
. Herfel, Berry, Diemar, 
Dziesch, Dorsey. Baumgart 



us. Hill, Popp. Second Row: 
Dapper. Third Row: Barrett, 
Coach Sadosky. Fourth Row: 



120 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Boyd — Danville 

2. Broaddus — Eastern 

3. Liter— Trinity 

4. Jordan — Male 

5. Travis — ^Caldwell County 

Time: 15.3 

100 Yard Dash— 

1. Sprous — Highlands 

2. McGee — Hopkinsville 

3. Lewis — Manual 

4. Wallace — Meade County 

5. Heni-y — Trinity 

"Time: 10.2 

Mile Run— 

1. Cleaver — ^Bourbon County 

2. Groce — Southern 

3. Wells— M. M. L 

4. Mathis — Waggener 

5. Sanders — Henderson County 

Time: 4:33.4 

880 Yard Relay— 

1. Highlands 

2. Trinity 

3. Valley 

4. Male 

5. Hopkinsville 

Time: 1:33.9 



440 Yard Dash— 

1. Jokl — Lafayette 

2. Schwartz — Atherton 

3. Campbell — Ashland 

4. Dawson^ — Holmes 

5. Stamper — Tilghman 

Time: 50.5 
180 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Lienhardt — Newport 

2. Travis— Caldwell County 

3. Boyd-^Danville 

4. Liter — Trinity 

5. Bersot — Athei'ton 

Time: 20.6 
880 Yard Run— 

1. Cleaver — Bourbon County 

2. Stephens— M. M. L 

3. Cambron — St. Xavier 

4. Mathis — Waggener 

5. Pfanstiel — Tilghman 

Time: 2:00.5 
Cleaver set a new state record 
of 1:58.4 in the qualifying heat. 
220 Yard Dash— 

1. Sprous — Highlands 

2. Jokl — Lafayette 

3. Cooper — Lebanon Rosen- 

wald 

4. Miller — Male 

5. McGee — Hopkinsville 

Time: 22.8 



Mile Relay — 

1. Tilghman 

2. Trinity 

3. Southern 

4. Highlands 

5. Shawnee 

Time: 3:31.5 
(New Record) 
Shot Put— 

1. Hayden — St. Joseph Jrep. 

2. Bell— Eastern 

3. Greenslait — Raceland 

4. Mattingly — Trinity 

5. Stamper — Tilghman 

Distance: 51'5 %" 
Pole Vault — 

1. Jennings — Holmes 

2. Griffith— Ashland 
2. Simpson — Newport 

4. Page — Eastern 

5. Schott — ^Hazel Green 
5. Seward' — Valley 

5. Schuette — Henderson City 
5. Baker — Tilghman 
5. Jackson — Shawnee 
5. Stith — Meade County 

Height: IV ^Vz" 
(Continued on Page Fifteen) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOLUME XXII— NO 1 



AUGUST, 1959 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

Louisville, Kentucky, July 9, 1959 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Dear Sir: 

Pursuant to instructions received, -we have made an audit 
of the books and records of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
/association for the period of one year beginning July 1, 1958, 
and ending June 30, 1959. In addition we have prepared and 
attached hereto, statements of the Receipts and Disbursements, 
which in our opinion, reflect the true financial condition of the 
Association as of June 30. 1959. 

The Cash Funds on Hand and U. S. Savings Bonds Accounts 
were found to be correct and verified by letter from your 
depositories. 

We find records presented to us for the purpose of 
audit to be in agreement and in good condition. 
Respectfully submitted, 
JOHNSON-FOWLER & COMPANY 
By Huet L. Johnson 
Certified Public Accountant 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 1958 TO JUNE 30, 1959 
STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in Checking Account July I, 1958 $ 18,655.84 

Annual Dues: 453 ffl $3.00 $ 1,359.00 

Officials^ Dues: 

Football: 373 @ $3.00 1,119.00 

Basketball: 1,212 (a $3.00 3,636.00 

Reciprocity Officials: 

Football: 32 @ $1.00 32.00 

Basketball: 18 m $1.00 18.00 

Officials Fines: 19 M $5.00 95.00 

Schools' Fines: 1 m $5.00 5.00 

Redeposits (Bad checks made good) 30.00 

Advertising in Magazine 800.00 

Sale of Rules Books 131.50 

Ticket Sales - Annual Meeting 210.00 

Interest Received from Government Bonds 1,361.00 
Interest Received from First Federal 

Savings and Loan Ass'n 268.30 

Interest received from Union Federal 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 256.66 

Traneferred from Union Federal Loan 

Association Savings Account 4,000.00 

Temporary Loan from First Federal 

Savings & Loan Association 6,000.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 81,913.07 

Refunds 451.30 

Receipts - State Baseball Tournament 623.50 

Overpayment 12.00 102,321.33 

$120,977.17 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 3,811.72 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $10,500) 7,662.85 

Expense - Commissioner's Office 381.85 

Ass't Commissioner's Salary 

(Base Sal. $7,500) 6,001.00 

Travel Expense - Ass't Commissioner 1,002.98 

Clerical Help 4,770.77 

Janitor Service 753.88 

Postage 2,027.99 

Office Supplies 491.46 

Janitor Supplies 58.87 

Insurance 363.76 

Equipment Repairs & Service Contracts 411.23 

Building Repairs 8.50 

Payment of Short Term Loan 6,085.79 

Utilities 758.57 

Telephone and Telegraph 1,082.80 

Fidelity Bonds 43.78 

Printing 2,229.92 



Appropriation to Kentucky 

Coaches Charity Ass'n 500.00 

Appropriation to K.A.P.O.S. 200.00 

Purchase of National Federation 

Publications 1,798.69 

Delegates to National Federation 

Meetitngs 2,142.69 

National Federation Dues 126.20 

Girls Division - N.S.G.W.S 300.00 

Rental on Films 481.00 

Audit 50.00 

Refunds ,_ 12.00 

Bad Checks 39.00 

Meals - Annual Banquet 1,650.00 

Speaker - Annual Banquet 50.00 

Taxes: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld_$ 3,307.20 

Social Security 776.88 

City Income Tax Withheld 373.82 

State Income Tax Withheld __ 589.44 
Hospitilization Withheld 289.10 5,336.44 

Transfer of Funds: 

To Savings Accounts 4,000.00 

To K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund 18,500.00 22,500.00 

Magazine ; 

Printing and Engraving 3,904.64 

Mailing $5.00 3,989.64 

Officials' Division: 
Honorariums and Expenses - 

Clinics 1,110.46 

Printing and Miscellaneous 

Expense 45.40 

School for Basketball Officials 1,357.50 
Expenses - Regional Basketball 

Clinics 269.12 

Officials' Emblems 352.10 3,134.58 

Swimming: 

State Committee Expense 284.86 

Trophies and Medals 

(State Meet) 477.57 

Officials (State Meet) 236.40 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 2,126.06 3,124.89 

Golf: 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament) __ 926.61 

Trophies and Awards 708.84 

Miscellaneous Expenses 37.10 1,672.55 

Tennis: 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament) __ 218.61 

Trophies and Balls 1,051.60 

Miscellaneous Expenses 75.80 1,346.01 

Track: 

Regional Expense 370.71 

Trophies and Medals 1,788.41 

State Committee Expense 595.12 

Officials 530.00 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 6,325.38 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

(State Meet) 8.00 

New Equipment 93.38 

State Clinic 16.00 9,727.00 

Baseball ; 

Refunds on District 

Tournament Deficits 4,076.06 

Trophies and Awards 1,358.08 

Refunds on Regional 

Tournament Deficits 388.30 

Baseballs (State Tournament) 85.26 

Transportation (State 

Tournament) 581.10 

Meals (State Tournament) ___ 1,008.00 
Ticket Sellers and Takers 

(State Tournament) 74.00 

(Continued on Page Three) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



AUGUST, 1959 



VOL. XXII— NO. 1 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIKLU 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-601, Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1967-611, Marion 

Direiaors— W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-621, Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsythe (1959-63), Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-6:!!. 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates Jl.OO Per Year 



Jtrom tne Commissioners Office 

Football Clinics 

The 1959 clinics for football officials will 
be conductecl by Athletic Director Edgar Mc- 
Nabb, Assistant Principal of the Beechwood 
High School, South Fort Mitchell. Mr. Mc- 
Nabb has been the K. H. S. A. A. representa- 
tive on the National Federation Football 
Committee for several years. The dates and 
sites ot the clinics are as follows : August 
16, Ashland Y. M. C. A., 8:00 P. M. (EST); 
August 17, Pikeville High School, 8:00 P. M. 
(EST) ; August 18, Bell High School, Pine- 
ville, 8:00 P. M. (EST) ; August 23, Bowling 
Green High School, 8:00 P.M. (CST) ; 
August 24, Henderson High School, 8:00 
P. M. (CDT) ; August 25, Mayfield High 
School, 8:00 P.M. (CST); August 30, New- 
port High School, 8 :0'0 P. M. (EST) ; August 
31, University High School, Lexington, 8:00 
P. M. (CDT) ; September 1, Kentucky Hotel, 
Louisville, 8:00 P. M. (CDT). 

Registration of Officials 

Football and basketball officials previously 
registered have received their renewal appli- 
cation cards for the 1959-60 school year. Ap- 
proximately one hundred officials failed to 
file their 1958-1959 reports on or before the 
deadline set by the Board of Control for the 
submitting of reports, and it was necessary 
to impose fines on these officials who failed 
to comply with As.sociation rules. It is an 
Association requirement that each registered 
official attend the clinic in the sport in which 
he is registered. Twenty-eight football offi- 
cials and eighty-eight basketball officials 
were suspended in 1958-59 for failure to at- 
tend clinics. 




Acree Austin 
IN MEMORIAM 

Acree Austin, Vice-Presidant of Mayfield's Lib- 
erty Saviinigs Bank, former clerk of the state's hig-hest 
court, and prominent official in K.H.S.A.A. sports, 
died in Mayfield on May 4 from complications which 
followed an operation. Mr. Austin, who was affec- 
tionately known as "Spurg" to hosts of school people 
and other friends, had been public-address-system 
announcer at the state high school basketball tourna- 
ments for the past twelve years. He was stricken 
on the last day of the tournament in March at 
Lexing-ton. 

Mr. Austin, who was born in Paducah, attended 
high school at Boaz and at Mayfield. After gradu- 
ation from Murray State College, where he majored 
in physical education, he taught at Symsonia. In 
19155 he married Miss Irene Collier, also a teacher. 
They had two children. 

Once Mr. Austin served as finance director of 
the National Youth Administration in Kentucky, 
supervisor of the agricultural census in the First 
Congressional District, and assistant to the intelli- 
gence officer at the Kentucky Ordnance Works. He 
was known in Western Kentucky for his work durimg 
many years as a basketball and football referee, and 
for promotion of an annual basketball game for 
the benefit of crippled children. He had been g'en- 
eral manager of the Mayfield baseball team in the 
old Kitty Leagrue, athletic director for a Mayfield 
clothing- firm, and recreation director for the old 
Works Progress Administration in Kentucky. He 
was Clerk of the State Court of Appeals during the 
1952-56 period, after serving four years as circuit 
clerk in Graves County. 

Bill Powell, in a moving editorial which ap- 
peared in the Paducah Sun-Democrat, said of Acree 
Austin: 

"Men are hard to measure; you can't always tell 
what they were by what they built or wrote or 
painted or carved. Social and economic marks don't 
mean much either. 

"Some men make the grade who shouldn't; 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Page Three 



others fall by the wayside when they should rise 
high. Personalities, too, are confusing, and so are 
most of the other measurements of men and women. 

"But there is one sure way you can tell what 
a man was. That is by the number of friends he had. 

"By this measure, Acree Austin stood far above 
most people. Acree, who died this week at the age 
of 50, made and kept an incredible host of good 
friends who sought him out while he lived and 
sorrowed when he died. 

* * * 

"At his peak Western Kentucky never had a 
better basketball official. Acree Austin gave the 
game some kind of unusual dignity, and he gave 
the boys respect for themselves and for the rules 
they were supposed to follow. 

"It was some kind of pleasure to be bawled out 
on the court by Acree Austin. He made me feel 
important instead of embarrassed or little. But he 
let me and all the others know that it was follow 
his instructions or watch the game from the stands. 

* * * 

"Acree never lost his interest in athletics and 
was in charge of the public address system at the 
state basketball tournament every year. He got 
sick during the 1959 tournament and never recovered. 

"The state tournament will miss the strong, yet 
high-pitched, voice of 'Spaghetti' Austin." 



AUDIT— 



(Continued from Page One) 

400.00 



Lodg:ing (State Tournami 



Scorer (State Tournament) __ 
Umpires (State Tournament) 
Expenses - Ass*t Manager 

(State Tournament) 

State Clinic 


25.00 
210.00 

48.00 
100.40 

30.00 




Grounds Men (State 

Tournament) 


8,384.20 


K.H.S.A.A. Retirement Fund 

Cross Country: 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 

Trophies and Awards 

Expenses (Regional Meets) 

Miscellaneous Expenses 


824.40 

351.89 

12.50 

33.60 


4,500.00 
$1,222.39 $110,234.80 

$120,977.17 


Disbursements 




110,234.80 



Cash Balance 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement, June 30. 1959_ 
Less Outstanding Checks: 

No. 452 $ 39.61 

No. 514 51.00 

No. 680 50.00 

No. 681 29.05 

No. 682 144.85 

No. 683 3.57 

No. 684 94.08 



-$ 10,742.37 

$11,166.03 



1959 $10,742.37 



True Bank Balance June 3 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance - First National 

Bank & Trust Company. _$10,742.37 
U. S. Savings Bonds (Value 

June 30. 1959) 48,783.50 

Savings Account - First Federal 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 10,000.00 

Savings Account - Union 

Federal Savings & Loan 

Ass'n 10,000.00 

K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund ___ 4.83 



Total Funds on Hand, June 30, 1959 $79,530.70 



ST. XAVIER'S CHAMPIONSHIP TENNIS TEAM 




Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. 

Building and Equipment $98,463.60 



(Left to Right): Bro. Valens, Coach; John Evans, singles 
Champion and member of the doubles championship team ; Jackie 
Cooper, of the doubles team : Bobby Cooper, regional semi- 
finalist. 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
1959 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales $108,300.00 

Profit on Program 2,723.92 $111,023.92 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing $ 735.78 

Trophies and Awards 678.84 

Postage 150.00 

Public Liabiltiy Insurance 732.57 

Incidental Expense - (16 Teams) 4,800.00 

Transportation 1,414.30 

Lodging 3.977.35 

Meals 6.743.50 

Coliseum Rental 3,017.50 

Organist 50.00 

Officials' Fees and Expense 1,572.20 

Scorers and Timers 480.00 

Shot Chart Keepers and Statisticians 220.00 

Ushers 200.00 

Ticket Sellers, Ticket Takers, and Guards 1,798.00 

Public Address Announcers 170.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 55.74 

Films 190.00 

Towel Service 51.00 

Taxi Service for Teams 130.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses -Tournament 

Manager 26.00 

Honorariums and Expenses -Ass't 

Tournament Managers 1,233.07 

Detective Service 660.00 

Audit 25.00 $ 29,110.85 

Transfer of Funds - Amount Transferred 

to K.H.S.A.A. as Tournament Profit $ 81,913.07 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
K.H.S.A.A. PROTECTION FUND 
JULY 1, 1958 TO JUNE 30, 1959 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in Checking Account July 1, 1958 $4,089.41 

Players Insurance Fees : 

Football: 4.690 (o $3.00 $14,070.00 

Phys. Ed. & All Sports 
except Football : 
6,733 a $1.00 6,733.00 

$20,803.00 
Less Credit Allowed 8,892.00 $11,911.00 

Officials Insurance Fees : 

Football: 45 (S $3.00 135.00 

Basketball: 254 (S $1.00 254.00 389.00 

Cash Transferred from 

K.H.S.A.A. Account 18,500.00 

Redeposits (Bad checks made 

good) 29.00 30,829.00 

Total Receipts $ 34,918.41 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



DISBURSEMENTS: 

Postage $ 150.00 

Printing 301.70 

Claims Paid: 

Football 24,620.39 

Basketball 6.492.12 

Baseball 592.26 

Track 35.50 

Clerical Help 2,008.87 

Taxes : 

Federal Income Tax Withheld 474.60 

Social Security 125.22 

State Income Tax Withheld 44.44 

City Income Tax Withheld 39.4S 

Bad Checks 29.00 $ 34,913.58 

Cash Balance in Bank $ 4.83 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement, June 30, 1959 $ 1,006.71 

Less Outstanding Checks: 

No. 734 $ 8.00 

No. 755 5.00 

No. 822 16.00 

No. 828 28.00 

No. 854 15.00 

No. 921 6.00 

No. 978 10.00 

No. 1001 10.00 

No. 1151 20.00 

No. 1173 5.00 

No. 1176 26.50 

No. 1193 50.00 

No. 1204 12.00 

No. 1206 25.00 

No. 1210 39.95 

No. 1216 23.00 

No. 1218 143.20 

No. 1219 23.00 

No. 1220 92.40 

No. 1221 10.00 

No. 1222 50.00 

No. 1223 196.38 

No. 1224 10.00 

No. 1225 11.43 

No. 1226 10.14 

No. 1227 155.88 1.001.88 

True Bank Balance, June 30, 1959 $ 4.83 



MAYFIELD'S CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF TEAM 



MAYFIELD GOLF TEAM WINS STATE 
TOURNAMENT 

The Mayfield High School Golf Team won the 1969 State 
High School Golf Tournament with the low score of 630. The 
tournament was held at Fort Knox Lindsey Golf Course on 
May 25-26, and was managed by Coach John W. Hackett, of 
the Fort Knox High School. The St. Xavier High School team 
was runner-up with a score of 639. and the Trintiy High School 
was third with 649. Other team scores were : Danville, 660 ; 
Maysville, 663 : Dixie Heights, 667 : Owensboro, 671 : Bowling 
Green, 674 ; Fern Creek, 675 ; Southern, 679 : Atherton, 683 ; 
Waggener, 685 ; St. Joseph's, 692 ; Seneca, 700 : Flaget, 703 ; 
Eussellville, 713 : Middlesboro, 723. 

Ted Hale of Mayfield was individual champion with a score 
of 148. He shot a one-over par 73 on the final eighteen holes. 
Bruce Wyatt of Shawnee and J. Knight of Danville tied for 
second place with 151. 

One hundred boys took part in the tournament. Individual 
scores of some of the leaders are as follows : 

148— Hale (Mayfield) 

151— Wyatt (Shawnee I : Knight (Danville) 

154 — Ferriell (Trinity) 

155— Settles (Owensboro) ; Ahern (St. Xavier) 

156 — Kettenacker (Dixie Heights) 

157— Lyles (Scottsville) ; Lally (St. 
(Mayfield) 

158— Ryan (St. Joseph) 

160— Heilman (Franklin Co.) : Traxel (Maysville) : Belote 
(Mayfeild): Casabella (Flaget): Ehlen (Dixie Heights) 

161— Brohman (Trinity) : Jones (Bowling Green) ; Eoyal 
(Southern): Junot lAtherton) 

162— Dillion (Trinity); Kirk (Maysville! 

16.3 — VanHoose (Paintsville) : Denham 
(Waggener) : Wilson 
thern) Grasch Flaget) : 1 
eca) ; Neat (Fern Creek) 



(St. Xavier) : Sche 
164— Houston (So 
165— Edinger (Se: 

Lancaster (Mayfield) 



(Da 



166- 



■ille) 



(Tr 



Lity) : 



Nole 



Harp 



(Seneca) : Miner 
(Owensboro) 
Baron St. Xavier) 
Doll (Manual) : 



(Fern Creek) ; Ferrell 



167— Stephens 
(Atherton) : Weick 

168— Blank (C 
Young (Owensboro 
Green) 



='ern Creek) ; Rov (Country Day) : Vance 
(Oldham Co.) : Demling (Trinity) 
vington Catholic) : Brown (Maysville) ; 
; Cockrell (Danville) : Hagan (Bowling 




dual champion). 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the Beechwood 
High School, South Fort Mitchell, Kentucky, on Fri- 
day morning, July 31, 1959. The meeting was called 
to order by President Russell Williamson at 9:30, 
with all Board members, Commissioner Theo. A. 
Sanford, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mans- 
field present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Louis Litch- 
field, that the reading of the minutes of the April 
17th meeting be waived, since the members of the 
Board had received copies of these minutes. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner made a report to the Board 
on the receipts and disibursements of the K.H.S.A.A. 
and K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund for the year 1958- 
59. He presented copies of he audit, recently pre- 
pared by the Johnson-Fowler Company of Louisville. 
Total funds on hand June 30, 1959, were reported 
as being $79,530.70. He stated that a complete break 
down on receipts and expenses would appear in a 
forthcoming issue of the magazine. He then pre- 
sented a proposed K.H.S.A.A. budget for the year 
1959-60 with estimated receipts of $105,920.00 and 
estimated disbursements of $104,710.00. There was 
general discussion of the various budget items, 
W, B. Jones moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, that 
the report of the Commissioner be accepted and ap- 
proved; and that the 1959-1960 K.H.S.A.A. budget 
be adopted as presented. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

K. G. Gillaspie and Robert P. Forsythe gave re- 
ports on the annual meeting of the National Federa- 
ously adopted by the oBard of Control. He further 
on June 28 - July 2, 1959. 

The Commissioner stated that plana were mov- 
ing along for the holding of the first K.H.S.A .A, 
football championships, scheduled for the forthcom- 
ing 1959 season. He stated that schools had been 
assigned to their classes and regions, and that he 
would put into effect the various regulations for de- 
termining the champions in the three classes, previ- 
ously adopted by the Board of Control. He further 
stated that a plan should be adopted to break a tie 
for a regional class championship if one should 
occur in the Dickinson System ratings. The Com- 
( Continued on Page TKventy) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Page Five 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Stoll Field, Lexington, Kentucky 

June 3 - 4. 1959 

duPont Manual (7) 





(0) 


duPont Manual 


(17) 


duPont Manual (3) 
Greenville (1) 




Paducah Tilghman 


Lafayette (0) 




Caverna (0) 










Lafayette (1) 


Harlan (4) 




duPont Manual — 






Champion 


Harlan (1) 




McKell (0) 




Greenville (5) 










Greenville (2) 






Highlands (1) 











Twenty-Seventh Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Shawnee Park, Louisville, May 18 - 19, 1959 
SINGLES 
Evans - St. Xavier QUARTER-FINALS SEMI-FINALS 



Davis - St. Joseph 


Evans - 6-0; 6-1 


Evans - 6-1 ; 7-5 


FINALS 

Evans - 10-8; 6-1 


Evans - 
4-6; 6-3; 




Day - 

4-6; 6-4; 6-2 








Spragens - Danville 


McNerney- 
6-0; 6-3 








Day - Covington 


McNerney - 
6-0; 6-3 








McNerney - Flaget 


McGill - 9-7; 6-4 




DeVan - K. M. I. 




Walker - 
6-2; 6-3 








Hamblen - Bellevue 


McGill - 

6-3; 3-6; 6-3 






6-3 


Walker - Trinity 


McGill - 6-2; 6-3 
Cooper - 6-1; 6-2 








McGill - Flaget 




Steinberg-Henry Clay 








Smith - Owensboro 


Meyers - 
6-2; 6-3 








Cooper - St. Xavier 


Duckor - 6-1; 6-2 








Kute - Trinity 










Duckor - KMI 


Meyers - 

6-0; 4-6; 6-2 








Evans - Berea 







Meyers - Bellevue 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



St. Xavier 




1 
Bye |- 


Henry Clay 




1 


Trinity 


1 


Atherton 


K. M. L 




Owensboro 




1 
Bellevue | 



TENNIS DOUBLES 
SEMI-FINALS 

St. Xavier FINALS 

St. Xavier — 6-2; 6-2 



Trinity — 6-1; 6-4 



Atherton— 9-7; 2-6; 6-0 



Bellevue — 6-2; 6-2 



Bellevue — 9-7; 6-2 



St. Xavier — 6 - 1 ; 8-6 



Schools' Ratings on Basketball Officials 



The following ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1958-59. The numbers 
following each name represent respectively the number of 
Excellent. Good, Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official. 

Abbott, Lester B., 0-0-0-1 : Abell, James A., 2-6-0-0 : Aber- 
nathy, George R., 3-0-0-0; Able, Forest, 6-14-3-0; Adams, Cecil 
Edward, 4-9-2-2 ; Adkins, Alec K., 2-0-2-0 ; Adkins, Raymond C., 
28-40-15-0 ; Akins. Charles, 9-16-3-1 ; Akridge, Dean. 2-0-0-0 ; 
Alexander, Rex E., 16-14-4-4 ; Allen, Jack R., 7-9-1-1 ; Allen, 
Lowry R., 8-7-2-1 ; Allen, Nelson R., 9-17-4-0 ; Allison, Don, 
0-0-1-0; Almon, James H., 0-14-0-1; Almond. Alvin, 1-2-0-0; 
Amburgey. Jesse. 1-0-0-0 : Arlington, William Robert, 0-0-1-2 ; 
Arnold, Kenneth, 22-30-3-2 ; Ai-nold, Marvin R., 0-7-3-2 ; Ashley, 
Kenneth, 1-8-4-2; Austin, Ray, 2-5-1-2; Austin, W. G., 4-17-4-2. 

Llack, Adrian G.. Jr., 4-13-4-2 ; Bailev. Ai-ville. 2-9-3-1 : 
Baird, Bill, 2-6-1-0 ; Baker, Charles T., 1-3-4-1 : Baker, Fred, 
0-2-0-0; Baker, James E., 28-19-4-3; Baker, Morris, 1-2-2-0; 
Ball, Denver, 5-6-5-1; Ballard, Jack H., 11-15-2-0; Ballinger, 
Richard L., 6-13-8-3 ; Bankemper, Jerome, 3-0-0-0 : Bankemper, 
Thomas, 0-0-1-0 ; Barker, Donald, 0-4-0-0 ; Barker, Harold, 
0-6-0-0; Barker, Walter D., 0-11-2-0; Barlow, Billy B., 3-2-0-0; 
Bai-nes, Judson, 8-.5-0-1 ; Barnett, J. W., 0-4-0-1 ; Barry. Harold, 
1-8-0-2; Barton, Walter W., 1-5-4-0; Baskin. Sylvester, 0-15-0-1; 
Batten, Wade H., 1-1-0-0; Baumever, William A.. 0-4-0-0: 
Beard. Monie. 6-15-1-0 ; Beard, Ralph M., 3-11-1-9 : Begley, 
James P., 0-2-4-0 ; Begley. James P.. 0-2-4-0 ; Bell, Clarence T., 
2-11-4-0; Benedict, Johnny, 0-3-0-0; Bennet, Bert A.. 6-18-6-1; 
Bennett, Gene, 0-8-1-0 : Bentlev, James, 0-10-6-5 ; Betz, Dick, 
8-9-2-2; Billings, B. E.. 0-3-0-1; Black. Charles D., 11-17-3-0; 
Black, Clarence, 11-18-1-0 ; Blackburn, Adrian, 1-5-7-0 ; Black- 
burn, Clyde W., 9-9-3-5; Blackburn. Viley O.. 1-9-1-0; Blanken- 
ship. Zeb. 0-1-0-0 ; Blanton. Charles R.. 1-0-0-0 ; Blanton. Homer, 
10-27-2-0; Bonner. William, 0-7-1-0; Bosch, Bill, 8-9-3-0; 
Bowling, Roy, 0-7-0-1 ; Bowman, Earl G.. 11-15-9-1 ; Boyd. 
Tommy, 0-2-1-0 ; Boyles. Paul E.. 11-21-7-4 ; Bradshaw, Bill, 
1-12-7-4; Branaman, Bill, Jr., 11-19-1-0; Braughler. David L., 
1-3-3-1; Braun, Bob, 4-13-7-0; Brewer, Randal, 4-24-7-3; 
Brichler, .Toe A.. 1-7-4-0 ; Bridges, Bennie E.. 32-16-2-0 : Briscoe. 
Hubert, 0-4-1-0 ; Brizendine, Vic, 24-43-2-1 ; Broderick, Carroll 
A., 33-38-4-2 ; Brotzge, Maurice J., 0-6-0-2 ; Brown, Bill G., 
0-0-0-3 ; Brown, Bryant, 7-23-4-2 ; Brown, C. R.. 1-3-0-0 ; Brown, 
E. C. 8-17-20-4; Brown, James A.. 1-4-1-1; Brown. James W., 
9-24-8-7; Brown, J. Carlton. 8-20-0-2; Brown. John W., 9-15- 
2-0: Brown. Thomas, 2-0-0-0; Browning, William H., 1-15-3-5; 
Brugh, Walter J., 4-11-1-0; Brummett, Joseph W.. 27-25-3-2; 
Bruner, Jack C. 8-15-3-2; Bryant. William B.. 2-1-0-0; Buis, 
N. A., 10-30-7-2 : Bunnell. Kenneth L.. 4-18-4-3 ; Burchett. 
Lanier, 2-14-3-3 ; Burdett, Wally M., 0-2-0-0 ; Burke. David L., 
1-4-0-0; Burton, Charlie, 1-3-3-1; Burton, Dennis. Jr.. 0-9-0-0: 
Bu.sh, Everett. 2-2-1-0; Bush. Oscar F.. 0-1-0-0; Butcher. Gran- 
ville, 6-24-0-0; Butcher, Paul. 10-25-6-2: Butler. Donald A., 
4-6-1-2 : Buzzerio, Larry, 21-38-5-1. 

Caldwell. James A.. 6-4-1-2 ; Calhoun. Foster. 8-11-3-1 ; 
Campbell, French, 10-14-3-3; Campbell, John, Jr., 20-14-1-0; 
Canady, Ray Blair, 5-2-0-0 ; Canter, John. 1-2-4-1 : Capps, 
Jerry, 16-7-3-0 ; Carnes. Richard, 1-2-0-0 ; 
21-43-1-2; Carpenter. Leonard. 20-19-3-0; Can 
Carrithers, Calvin L., 9-2-0-0 ; Carroll, Joe E.. 0-2-0-0 : Carson, 
Louis, 0-0-1-0 ; Cartee, Ralph, Jr., 9-4-0-2 ; Carter. Clifton, 
7-7-1-0: Cassady, Charles W., 7-26-8-2: Cassadv, Richard, 
2-32-7-5 ; Casteel, Ralph M., 5-7-1-0 ; Castle, lindle. 1-2-3-0 : 
Gates, Thomas H., 1-12-0-0: Gates, Vernon R.. 17-12-2-4; Cathey, 
Gene S.. 0-0-2-0; Center. Marion. 1-3-1-0; Chafin. David Lee. 
0-4-2-0: Chambers, Bill M.. 1-0-0-0; Chandler. James F., 0-1-2-0; 



Chandle 



Tho 



Charles, 28-11-3-0 ; Chu 



B., 2-1-5-2; Clark, Owen B., 1-1-0-0; Coakley, Robert D., 
0-7-4-1 : Coffey, Kenneth B., 6-37-7-1 ; Cohen, Robert, 1-1-1-1 ; 
Cole, Harold E., 1-1-1-0 ; Coleman, L. J.. Jr., 12-14-1-1 ; Colgan, 
Donald L., 5-7-4-4; Collins, Bill, 0-4-3-0; Combs, James Glenn, 
2-4-2-3; Combs, Roy B., 2-5-0-2; Combs. Travis, 10-8-2-0: Conley, 
George, 38-13-2-1; Conley, Ted Lynn, 1-9-3-0; Conley, Tom W., 
0-9-0-0 : Conn, Hershel, 10-0-0-1 ; Cooke, George W., 8-28-0-0 ; 
Cooper ,John, 0-1-0-0 ; Cooper, John Wellington, 6-11-1-2 ; Cooper, 
Warren H., 34-20-1-2 ; Copley, Sidney M., 4-4-1-1 : Coppage, 
Donald L., 2-5-1-0; Cox, Ralph, 5-6-2-0: Cox, Rufus A., 0-13-1-0; 
Coyle, Ernest T.. 4-2-0-0 ; Craft, Bill, 33-17-6-3 ; Craig, John G., 
3-12-1-3 ; Crawford, Donald R., 0-3-1-0 ; Creekmore, Ken, 4-16- 
8-1 : Cropper, William C, 0-3-3-0 : Crosthwaite. John S.. Jr., 
30-17-0-2 : Crutcher, James W.. 28-30-7-0 ; Ci-utcher. Joseph 
Lamar, 0-6-4-1 : Cullivan. Jim, 3-5-2-1 ; Gulp, Capt. Willard E., 
2-1-2-0 ; Cummins, Albert B., 4-7-2-0 ; Cummings, Dale A.. 
3-7-0-1 ; Cunningham, Julian R., 0-9-1-0 ; Current, E. Ray, 
2-2-1-0 : Curtis, Robert Lee, 0-1-1-0. 

Dame, L. J., 0-1-1-1; Daniels, W. R., 1-4-0-0; Daum, 
Charles A.. 3-11-1-0; Davenport, Robert B., 2-14-8-4: Davenport, 
William R.. 2-6-1-8 ; Davis. Donald. (Bellevue) 11-14-3-1 : Davis, 
Donald, (Science Hill) 3-1-0-0: Davis, Dwight R.. Jr., 4-31-5-2; 
Davis, Ralph E., 7-7-0-0; Davis, William "Bunny", 0-13-3-2; 
DeGroote, James A„ 0-1-0-1 ; DeMoisey, Fox, 26-46-6-0 ; De- 
Moisey, Truett R.. 29-41-8-1 ; Denney, B. L., 2-20-4-1 : Denton, 
Charles M.. 0-6-2-0 : Deskins, Tilden, 9-14-4-1 ; Diachenko, Nick 
C. 7-8-1-2 : Dial, Jack, 3-0-0-0 ; DiMuzio, Robert M., 7-7-1-3 ; 
Dixie, Cornelius, 4-8-0-1 : Dixon, Charles T., 0-6-0-0 ; Dobson, 
Kenneth, 6-22-0-0 ; Dorroh, Glenn U., Jr., 0-2-1-0 ; Dorsey, James 
A., 1-5-3-0 ; Dotson, W. S.. 0-15-0-2 ; Downing. Dero G.. 7-3-0-0 ; 
Downing, Thomas E., 0-4-0-0 : Drake, Richard Rav, 8-15-3-1 ; 
Driskell, Earl, Jr.. 0-7-3-1 : Duerson, Guy K., Jr., 1-0-0-1 ; 
Duerson. William Robert, 0-6-2-0 : Duff. Birchel, 4-7-2-0 : Dun- 
can, Earl S.. 8-24-6-0 ; Durkin, Jack, 22-24-2-3. 

Eads. Walter. 0-4-1-2; Earle, Herschel G., 2-1-0-0; Edelen, 
Ben R., 26-26-9-3 ; Edwards, Hubert, 1-6-0-1 : Edwards, Lloyd. 
1-2-1-2: Elder, Donald G., 2-13-6-2; Elder, Robert J., 1-14-0-0; 
Eldridge. James R., 0-8-3-0 ; Elliott, Carroll L.. 3-12-4-1 ; Elliott, 
Humphrey T.. 0-1-0-0 ; Elovitz, Carl, 3-15-5-0 ; Elrod, William 
Turner, 15-36-3-2 ; England, James, 0-3-1-1 ; Evans, James, 
3-5-1-1, 

Fagues. Homer, 0-1-0-0 ; Fairchild, Gene P., 1-1-4-0 ; Falls, 
Harold B,, 0-2-0-0; Fanning, Homer, 15-10-2-0; Farley, Jimmy, 
0-1-0-0 : Farmer, John Clay, "Jack", 0-5-0-0 : Feix, Al, 1-6-4-1 ; 
Feix, Jimmie, 32-33-4-0 ; Ferrell, Doc, 62-23-3-0 ; Ferrell, Wil- 
liam E.. 3-0-0-0; Fey. Allen. 2-1-3-0: Fields, Joe D., 1-16-4-4; 
Figg, Charles Raymond, 5-10-6-0 ; Firestine, Frank V., Jr., 
1-8-0-0 ; Flagg. Robert A.. 0-9-2-1 : Fleenor, Francis, 2-19-5-2 ; 
Flood, Earl S., 2-6-0-0; Florence. T. G., 0-2-4-0: Flynr 
35-37-2-1 ; Forrest, Billy Joe. 3-7-0-0 ; Fort. .lohn W., 
Foster, Berryman E.. 0-20-3-0; Foster. William 
24-40-3-0 ; Fraley, Bill, 0-8-7-0 : Francis, George 
Francis, Wendell, 1-9-0-1 ; Franklin, Robert, 3-6-3-2 ; 
Oliver T., 1-1-1-0 ; Fritz, Shermai 
Hugh, 2-16-5-3; Fuller, John R.. 
9-6-0-0. 

Galloway, Gerald, 0-1-0-0 ; Gant, 
Howard E., 10-19-5-0 ; Gary. Robert, 
O.. 0-6-1-0: Gettler. John F., 4-7-3-1; Gibson, Fred, 1-1-0-0; 
Gibson, Romulus D., 8-22-2-1; Gilbert, Gerald Leroy, 6-18-3-0; 
Gilbert. Lawrence "Butch". 0-1-0-0 ; Gill, Joe, 5-8-4-2 ; Gillespie. 
Robert C. 1-1-3-0 : Gilvin. Allie F., 1-2-0-0 : Giordano, Al, 
16-9-3-0; Gipe. Logan., 2-5-3-0; Goetz, Larry C. 2-1-0-0; Goff, 
Reathel, 3-6-4-0 ; Golden, Billy Joe, 46-12-1-0 ; Goley, James E., 
3-11-2-2; Goodin, Charles L., 4-3-1-0; Goodin. Shirley G., 3-1-0-1; 
Goranflo, Robert E., 6-28-4-2; Gourley, Harold E., 1-0-0-0; 



Bobby, 

2-1-2-1 : 

,, "Bob", 

5-10-2-0 : 
Freese, 
1, 23-39-7-1 ; Fugate, E. 
1-3-4-0 ; Fuson, Shelvie, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Page Seven 



Grace, Charles K., 8-8-4-0 : Grace, Hickory E., Jr., 2-5-1-0 ; 
Graham, James E., 1-1-0-0 ; Gray, Raymond D., 8-53-9-1 ; Great- 
house, Bobby, 1-2-3-0 ; Green, Walter. Jr., 18-18-0-0 ; Greer, 
Tom, 1-4-1-1 ; Griese, Warren J., 0-2-0-0 ; Griffith, Daryel, 
4-1-0-1; Grigsby, Pete, Jr., 6-11-5-0; Grimes, James W., 
0-16-0-2 ; Grisham, Jesse R.. 6-22-2-0 ; Grooms, Randall, 8-18- 
1-1 ; Groves, Glendal D., 0-5-2-0 ; Gustafson, Al, Jr., 17-33-11-4. 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 26-23-0-1 ; Hagan, Joseph "Red," 
14-38-4-1 ; Hagedorn, Thomas. 11-1-0-1 ; Hale, Don 0. 10-38-3-0 ; 
Hale, John, 1-2-0-1 ; Hall, Billy Joe, 6-7-1-1 ; Hall, C. E., Jr., 
0-1-1-0 ; Hall, Monroe. Jr., 0-1-0-0 ; Hammond, William, 2-3-0-1 ; 
Hammons, Norman, 11-27-7-0 ; Hampton, Darrel C, 2-11-3-0 ; 
Hampton, Wallace Ray, 3-11-3-0 : Hardin, Ben W., 0-5-2-1 ; 
Hardin, Jack H., 1-2-0-0; Hargis, Bobby S., 7-11-6-3; Harmon 
Charles W., 0-10-4-4; Harmon. Hayes R., 9-10-2-2; Harper, 
Robie, Jr., 0-1-0-0 ; Harrell, Bill D., 15-19-5-0 : Harris, Jack, 
32-10-2-0 ; Harris, Joe D., 1-8-4-4 ; Harvey, Bennie, 0-9-5-1 ; 
Hatfield, Cecil, 1-5-0-1 ; Hatter, Jack, 1-2-1-0 ; Hayes, Adrian, 
3-13-4-0 ; Hayes, Douglas J., 0-15-3-0 ; Haynes, John, 19-19-2-2 ; 
Head, Elmo C, 5-0-0-2 ; Heldman, John, Jr., 2-0-0-0 ; Hensley, 
Hez, Jr., 0-2-3-0 ; Hensley, Robert B., 1-2-1-1 ; Hewling, Franklin, 
C, 3-8-7-0; Hewling, Richard, 6-19-11-2; Hibbs, Eugene M., 
0-2-3-0 ; Higgins, Bobby D., 0-5-2-2 ; Hightower, Kenneth, 4-9-3-1 ; 
Hill, Earl F., 1-8-3-3 ; Hill, Jimmie, 0-5-0-0 ; Hiten, John W., 
8-9-3-1 ; Hitt, Billy D., 0-6-3-0 ; Hobbs, Charles V., 1-18-6-1 ; 
Hobby, Bill, 1-2-1-5 ; Hodge, Don Robert, 1-3-0-0 ; Hodge, Fred, 
6-18-2-0; Hodges, Holbert, 3-1-0-1; Hoferer, Louis R., 7-14-3-0; 
Hoffman, Jack J., 1-2-2-2 ; Hofstetter, Joe, 9-9-1-0 ; Holcomb, 
Joe, 0-3-1-0 ; Holden, Frye H., 1-4-3-0 ; Holeman, Bill, 1-7-3-1 ; 
Holt, Robert E., 1-12-4-1 ; Hon, Woodrow, 1-11-3-0 ; Hook, 
Burnley B., 0-1-1-0 ; Hooks, Robert H., 10-15-2-2 ; Hornsby, 
John W., 0-0-1-1 ; Horton, John. 5-14-21-2 ; Hubbard, Ronald E., 
2-0-0-0 ; Hubbs, Cletus L., Jr., 1-5-0-1 ; Hudson. Oscar, 0-6-2-0 ; 
Huff, Carl R., Jr., 0-2-2-0 ; Huff, David N., 1-8-1-0 ; Hughes, 
Charles F., 66-9-1-0 ; Huiet. Fred "Whitey", 7-5-1-1 : Hummer, 
Irby, 8-18-4-2 ; Hunley, Neil P., 3-9-0-0 ; Hunt, Jack L., 0-4-1-0 ; 
Hunt, Leonard D., 5-25-0-0 : Huntsman, Bill, 9-22-1-1 ; Hurst, 
David E., 8-6-0-0 ; Hurst, Harold M., 0-2-0-1 ; Hutchinson. Jack 
T.. 1-3-2-1; Huter, James J., 21-14-1-2; Hyatt, Bob, 32-24-2-2; 
Hyland, Frank "Dick", 0-3-0-0. 

Inman, Briscoe, 34-20-4-3 ; Irwin, Charles, 34-37-3-5 ; Ison, 
Glennon B., 1-11-1-6. 

James, Edward, 1-0-0-0 ; James, Gene, 1-0-0-1 ; James, 
William V., 0-15-2-0 ; Jefferson, Charles R., 0-8-1-0 ; Jenkins, 
James D., 21-29-7-0 ; Jenkins, Kean, 10-9-1-1 ; Johnson, Charles 
W., 2-3-2-0 Johnson. John Luther, 3-6-0-0 ; Johnson, Walter, 
28-17-0-0 ; Johnson, William Bernard, 2-30-7-1 ; Johnston, Ed- 
ward E., 11-28-6-6 ; Jones, Bobby, 0-1-1-0 ; Jones, Boyer, 9-29-4-2 ; 
Jones, Carson G., 2-5-7-4 ; Jones, Charles Junior, 0-6-0-0 ; Jones, 
George W., 5-4-1-0 ; Jones, Robert T., 1-9-2-0 ; Jordan, Arthur, 
Jr., 0-1-0-0; Jordan, Ken, 18-23-3-1; Junker, Edwin, 0-3-1-0. 

Kaler, William R., 7-14-2-0; Kazee, Bill. 6-9-11-3; Keith, 
Freeman, 0-2-0-0 ; Key, Calvin, 2-3-0-0 ; Kimmel, Jerry, 18-13-4-2 ; 
King, Allen, 0-11-0-0 ; King, Bob, 6-15-6-0 ; King, James A., 
28-32-5-5 ; King, John J., Jr., 2-5-0-1 ; King, P. J., 0-3-0-1 ; King. 
Russell, 0-3-5-0 ; Kinman. Joe T., 37-38-8-1 ; Knight, Bill. 17- 
19-3-3 ; Kok, George, 7-24-4-4 ; Kremer, Joseph, 2-14-7-1. 

Lafferty, Clyde E., 2-5-1-2 : Lamb. Billy, 0-0-1-1 ; Lambert, 
Kenneth L., 1-2-0-0 ; Lance, Walter N., 39-38-6-1 ; Landolt, 
Gene, 20-32-11-6 ; Lashbrook, Harry E., Jr., 7-31-2-0 ; Lawson, 
Leland, 0-17-1-0 ; Lazarus, Rhea Price, 18-62-3-3 ; Leathers, 
OUie C, Jr., 0-4-0-0 ; Lee, Robert L., 15-19-3-1 ; Lee, William 
A., 0-2-0-0 ; Lefevers, Jasper Newt, Jr., 3-6-0-0 ; LeForce, Alan, 
1-0-0-0 ; LeVan, T. F., 1-14-7-4 ; Lequire, H. M., 24-7-2-0 : Lewis, 
Howard, 6-0-0-0 ; Lewis, Jack C, 4-4-2-1 ; Lewis, Milus G., 
3-0-2-0 : Liles, Billy C, 9-15-2-0 ; Litke, Walter, 2-7-1-0 ; Little- 
page, Pryce, 0-2-5-1 ; Littral, James W., 3-14-2-0 ; Logsdon, 
David L., 0-0-1-0 ; Longo, Richard, 5-3-1-0 ; Loudy, Kenneth, 
3-8-1-0 ; Lowe. Eugene, 3-12-3-4 ; Long, William G., Jr., 16-28- 
6-1 ; Longenecker, David M,, 15-21-4-0 ; Looney, Dick, 22-19-3-0 ; 
Lucas, Gene T., 24-13-3-1 ; Lykins. Joe D., 0-5-0-1 ; Lykins, 
John E., 4-7-0-0 ; Lyons, Charles S., 1-1-1-1 ; Lyons, Harold 
M. 3-3-0-1 : Lytle, William Price. 2-21-6-1. 

McAnelly, David F., 5-20-4-4 ; McBrayer, Donald E., 0-1- 
1-0 ; McBride, Donald R., 3-6-4-1 ; McBride, Kenneth, 7-21-2-1 ; 
McCargo, Frank, 0-3-0-0 ; McClaskey, Booker, 1-22-7-1 ; 
McClellan, Amos E., 1-3-0-0; McClellan, L. B., 12-41-15-0; 
McCord, Coleman. 1-16-2-0 : MeCowan, Connell, 7-22-0-1 ; Mc- 
Dowell, Glen D., 0-3-2-0; McFall, Gene G., 1-10-6-3; McGehee, 
Gordon, 0-1-0-0 ; McGlasson, Galen, 0-12-2-0 ; McGuire, Claude L., 
1-19-1-1 ; McHenry, Louis P., 3-15-3-2 ; McLeod, Robert, 6-7-6-1 ; 
McNeil, Patrick, 6-12-2-0; McPike, Ray S., 0-10-5-0; McQuilling, 
Gerald. 0-4-3-1. 

Macon, Allan Leon, 3-4-3-2 ; Mahan, Carle "Buddy", 26-24- 
4-0; Mahurin, Larry R., 0-7-2-0: Maines, George, 10-24-3-1; 
Marble, Luke, 2-8-0-2 ; Martin, Charlie, 0-3-3-1 ; Mason. Gene, 
5-25-4-2 ; Massey, Douglas L., 8-9-1-0 ; May, E. B., Jr., 17-22- 
9-6 ; Mayabb, Jesse P. 0-2-0-1 ; Mayes, Edward, 1-14-2-1 ; Mayo, 
Henry L., 0-2-0-0 ; Mays, Ralph, 15-12-4-3 ; Mazza, Al "Babe", 
2-2-0-0; Meade, Foster "Sid", 25-22-9-2; Meadors, Chester, 
0-1-0-0; Meadors, Marvin R., 28-31-8-1; Meeks, Jack, 7-18-2-0; 
Meiman, William A., 0-3-3-0 ; Melton, Curtis Ray, 0-2-1-1 ; 
Metcalf, Earl, 43-31-3-3; Meyer, Bud, 2-15-4-2; Mikez, Joe, 
14-27-2-0 ; Miles, Francis, 0-1-1-0 ; Miles, Joseph D., 1-2-1-0 ; 
Miller, Bill, 12-21-6-0; Miller. Bob, 14-19-0-0; Miller, Claude 
O., 3-0-0-0; Miller, Jack, 6-6-3-0; Miller, John D.. 1-7-1-0; 
Miller, Ferrell, 7-25-2-0 : Miller, Rex J., 4-7-1-0 ; Miller, Roy 
J., 2-2-0-1 ; Miller. Roy L., 6-22-4-1 ; Miller, William A., 
1-0-0-0: Miller, William L.. 1-1-0-0; Millerhaus, Bill, 2-1-0-0: 



Miracle, Ed., 9-3-1-0 ; Mobley, Tony, 0-5-3-0 ; Moll, Francis B., 
1-1-1-0 ; Monahan, Ed, 1-2-0-1 ; Monroe, Robert W., 0-8-5-1 ; 
Monroe, Robert, Jr., 0-2-2-0 ; Moore, Roy, Jr., 1-3-1-1 ; Morgan, 
Tom, 0-0-2-0 ; Moser, Emerson, 4-10-1-0 ; Moser, Rudy Clay, 
6-12-1-0 ; Mouser, H. D., 14-46-5-0 ; Mudd, Ed, 16-21-3-2 ; Mulli- 
gan, J. T., 0-12-1-0 ; Mullins, B. E., 1-7-3-0 ; Murphy, Donlad 
T., 1-2-0-1 ; Mussman, Ralph, Jr., 30-22-2-2 ; Myers, Edward 
B., 0-3-4-4. 

Nail, Samuel, 0-18-0-0 ; Nantz. Wilburn, 6-3-1-0 ; Nau, Bill, 
13-13-5-4; Neal, Gene, 36-38-2-0; Neal, Marion, 0-2-1-0; New- 
man, Bill, 0-3-0-0 ; Newman, Buddy, 0-2-0-0 ; Newnam, Luther 
G., 5-4-1-0 ; Newsom, Lawrence R., 0-1-0-0 ; Newsom, Marley, 
5-7-3-0 ; Newsome, !• orest, 1-12-3-2 ; Newton, C. M., 37-13-3-1 ; 
Newton, Reason G., 4-6-4-1 ; Nie, Allen F., 5-8-2-1 ; Nixon, 
James W., 4-34-7-1 ; Noble, Charles B., 14-14-2-1 ; Noble, Leonard, 
8-11-2-0; Noel, George E., 1-0-0-0; Noel, Paul, 3-8-0-0; Noel, 
Robert ., 2-3-0-0; Norvell, Glover H., Jr., 0-2-1-0; Nord, Ed, 
28-40-11-3. 

O'Bryan, Robert, 2-1-0-0 ; O'Connell, Jim, 1-0-4-0 ; O'Daniel, 
Jeff, 1-10-5-4 ; Odle, Thurman, 0-9-2-1 ; Oldham, Charles, 1-0-0-0 ; 
Oldham, John, 3-11-1-1 ; Omer, Billy W., 20-42-3-1 ; O'Nan, 
Eugene, 21-21-1-1 ; Overly, William H., 17-9-1-0 ; Owen, Arthur 
P., 1-2-0-0; Owens, Homer A., Jr., 1-8-2-1. 

Pack, Ervin B., 0-2-0-0; Padgett, R. K., 5-14-4-0; Page, For- 
rest C, 6-13-1-0 ; Page, William D., 2-4-1-0 ; Palmer, Carl A., 
1-1-0-0; Park, J. M., 3-12-8-1; Parker, Billie E. 37-21-0-0; 
Parrott, Lanny L., 12-17-5-0 ; Pate, Freddy, 0-0-0-1 ; Pate, Roy 
E., 0-1-0-0; Patrick, Ralph, 0-3-0-0; Patterson. C. Clement, Jr., 
0-2-1-0 ; Patten, John "B", 0-1-1-0 ; Payne, James W., 2-2-1-0 ; 
Pearson, Bobby Neal, 2-11-4-1 ; Peay, Curtis, 9-25-4-0 ; Peden, 
Harlan, 2-14-6-0 ; Peeno, Harry R., 2-13-1-1 ; Penner, Merritt 
D., 1-4-4-1; Penrod, Joe B., 24-22-2-2; Pergrem, Nard, 64-10-0-0; 
Perkins, William, 2-13-0-0 ; Perry, George, 3-3-2-1 ; Perry, 
James E., 1-2-0-0; Petett, Frank M., 1-6-2-0; Petty, John F., 
0-0-4-1 ; Phelps, John B., 1-2-0-2 ; Phelps, Ralph "Rudy", 18-37- 
8-2 ; Philpot, Kelsey Edward, 0-5-1-1 ; Pickens, Jim, 2-1-0-0 ; 
Poe, Thomas E., 1-10-0-0 ; Polston, Billy D., 0-3-1-0 ; Poppas, 
Nickolas, 5-2-3-2 ; Powell, Logan, 7-11-3-3 ; Prall, John A., 
0-2-0-0 ; Preece, Boyce C, 0-4-1-0 ; Presson, Jim, 2-1-1-1 ; Pres- 
ton, James Woodrow, 6-16-6-1 ; Price, James E., 3-36-5-2 ; 
Price, Jimmy H., 0-0-3-0 ; Prior, Lowell F., 1-0-0-0 ; PursifuU, 
Cleophus, 36-17-1-0. 

Quigg, Ben F.. Ill, 2-42-3-2; Quillen, John, 0-1-1-0. 

Hainey, Jimmy, 10-6-1-1 ; Raisor, J. T., 3-3-1-1 ; Eakel, 
Roland G., 2-7-1-3 ; Rail, Eugene, 4-19-6-1 ; Randolph, Don M., 
5-19-2-0 ; Randolph, John W., 0-3-0-0 ; Rannells. Richard H., 
0-2-0-0 ; Reagan, Johnny L., 8-6-0-3 ; Reding, Richard Keith, 
0-6-1-0 ; Redman, Malvern G., 1-1-0-0 ; Reed, Charles R., 6-3- 
0-0 ; Reed, Clifford, 4-6-3-0 ; Reed, Gordon "Moe", 8-20-6-1 ; 
Reeves, Kenneth H., 1-4-0-0 ; Reinhardt, Myron S., 16-24-3-0 ; 
Reschar, John C, 0-1-0-0; Rexroat, Jerry L., 5-12-1-0; Reynolds, 
Howard M., 0-0-1-0 ; Reynolds, W. J., Jr., 8-6-4-0 ; Rice, Fred, 
1-5-5-4 ; Richards, James S., 21-28-6-0 ; Richardson, Charles E., 
6-14-1-2 ; Richardson, Joe M., 7-16-4-1 ; Rickard, Bob, 3-16-5-1 ; 
Ricketts, Claude O., 35-24-4-2 ; Rickman, Murrell, 0-1-6-1 ; Riggs, 
William T., 0-11-0-0 ; Riley, Don D., 22-8-1-0 ; Ring, William H., 
1-0-0-0 ; Ritter, Donald, 1-0-0-0 ; Ritter, Goebel, 30-4-0-0 ; Roark, 
Paul G., 7-2-0-2 ; Roark, Van V., 0-1-0-0 ; Robards, John H., 
Jr., 0-7-4-0 ; Roberts, Donald G., 0-5-1-2 ; Roberts, Earl G., 
12-29-7-0; Robertson, William R., 0-2-0-0; Robinson, Pearl, 
0-2-0-1 ; Roby, Joseph L., 5-27-10-2 ; Rocke, James M., 9-19-4-6 ; 
Rogers, Howard, 3-0-1-1 ; Roller, Otis, 6-29-4-1 ; Rolph, Harold 
J., 8-1-0-0; Rose, Lee Hyden. 3-1-1-0; Rose, Wallace C, 20-24- 
11-1; Rosenbaum, Robert, 2-22-3-4; Rothfuss, Richard, 3-5-1-0; 
Rouse, Clyde L.. 11-18-0-1; Rubarts, Leland G., 13-35-9-3; 
Rubenstein, Sherman, 0-6-0-0 ; Runyon, Tommy Dean, 0-1-0-0 ; 
Rush, Jim T., 7-4-2-0 ; Rush, Ralph, 3-18-5-0 ; Russell, Allen, 
25-32-3-3; Russell, Eugene "Eudy", 1-3-0-0; Russell, Joe, 18-29- 
8-7 ; Rutledge, Pete, 0-8-1-0. 

St. Clair, Robert L., Jr., 3-14-4-1 ; Salchli, Stanley W., 
0-3-0-3; Samples, Bernard M., 1-9-0-4; Samples, Gilbert, 15-11- 
6-6 ; Sanders, Mel, 29-34-6-1 ; Saylor, Gene. 0-5-0-0 ; Schelhase, 
David, 0-2-0-0 ; Schlich, Paul, l;i-28-6-l ; Schnebelt, Carl, 0-0-1-0 ; 
Schultz, Paul, 0-1-0-0 ; Scott, Emanuel H., 0-1-0-1 ; Seale, John 
D., 3-4-4-1 ; Seelye, Arthur L., 3-16-5-2 ; Selvy, Curt, 8-20-1-1 ; 
Se.xton, William, 3-3-1-2 ; Settle. Evan, 1-0-0-1 ; Settle, Roy G., 
30-40-6-4; Shackelford, Roscoe, 1-1-1-0; Shaw, Don, 1-11-2-0; 
Shaw. Earl, 4-10-4-0; Shaw, Stanley E., 3-5-4-3; Sheffer, 
Darrell, 1-1-0-0 ; Shelton, Robert, 1-4-1-0 ; Shirley, Henry R., 
0-2-2-0 ; Shively, Howard, Jr., 1-8-1-0 ; Showalter, John W., 
4-4-2-0 ; Shuck, Thomas G., 4-21-5-2 ; Siler, Clarence M.. 12-14- 
4-1 ; Simms, Sylvester, 0-0-6-7 ; Simons, Joe Allen, 4-7-3-2 ; 
Simmons, Ronald F., 0-1-4-0 ; Simpson, Paul Dean, 1-11-0-1 ; 
Singleton, Vesper, 6-3-1-0 ; Slack, Earl H., 0-1-1-0 ; Slaughter, 
Alton H., 0-1-0-0 ; Sloan, Wallace, 3-8-2-0 ; Small, Rex, 4-23-1-0 ; 
Small, William W. "Bill", 16-22-6-1 ; Smith, Aubrey, 0-4-6-3 ; 
Smith, David W., 4-21-5-1 ; Smith, Edgar J., 5-21-2-0 ; Smith, 
Eurie H., Jr., 0-10-8-2; Smith, Wayne N., 14-12-5-3; Smith, 
Willard N., 16-17-6-2 ; Smithson, Richard, 10-23-4-4 ; Snowden. 
Ken, 2-4-0-0 ; Snowden, Lewis R.. 0-1-0-1 ; Solomon, Jim, 12-31- 
11-4 ; Sosh, LaRue, 21-4-1-1 ; Sosh, Nelson, 18-7-1-1 ; South, 
William F., 3-20-13-4; Spaulding, Stan, 1-1-0-0; Spencer, Ed- 
ward, 2-6-3-1 : Spencer, Irvin E.. 6-12-2-4 ; Spiceland, S. E., 
0-8-6-3 ; Stacy, Richie M.. 3-13-1-1 ; Stamper, Paul 1-0-0-0 ; 
Stanfill, Robert S.. 6-21-0-0 ; Steely, Stanley E.. 10-11-6-3 : 
Steenken, William R., 8-6-3-2 : Stephenson, Harry, 16-16-3-0 ; 
Stephenson, Thomas H., 0-2-0-0 ; Stewart, Herbert T., 5-17-6-4 ; 
Stinson, Charles L., 0-1-0-0 ; Stone, Clifton, 0-2-0-0 : Stone, 
Doyle C, 0-1-0-0 ; Stone, Robert 7-4-2-0 ; Strange, William L., 
11-1.3-1-2; Strong, Arnett, 32-22-1-0: Sturgill, Barkley J., 1.3-11- 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



4-1 : Stutler, John P., 2-3-0-0 ; Sulliv 
Sullivan, Wallace Brj-an, 6-1-4-0; Sumn 
Swope, William, 0-9-2-1. 

Taylor, Bob. 22-30-6-1 ; Taylor, Carl R., 2-12-3-1 ; Taylor, 
Dennis, 0-11-7-5; Taylor, Ed, 23-33-4-1; Taylor, Hal, 17-18-2-2; 
Taylor, James R., 0-17-1-0 ; Taylor, Jerry F.. 0-1-0-0 ; Taylor, 
Roger, 6-21-1-1 ; Teague, Amos, 3-3-0-0; Thacker, Cledith, 4-4-0-1 ; 
Thoma, M. L., 16-32-7-0 ; Thompson, Jack, 41-29-6-1 ; Thompson, 
Ralph, 4-1-1-0 ; Thompson, Thomas A., 1-7-0-0 ; Thompson, 
Tommy D., 3-1-0-0 ; Tibbs, Sonny, 1-2-0-0 ; Tichenor, Jimmy, 
1-4-3-0; Tincher, Robert, 4-4-1-0; Tindall. Gene D., 0-1-0-0; 
Tipton, Asa I.. 2-24-5-2 ; Todd, Lonnie H., 0-0-0-1 ; Tolle, Charles 
W., 2-0-0-0 ; Tolle, Lewis D., 1-1-0-0 ; Torian, Virgil, Jr.. 7-7- 
0-1 ; Trivette, John Bill, 6-2-3-0 ; Troutman, Doyle C, 14-3-0-0 ; 
Tuck, Ochell, 14-23-1-0; Tucker, Neal. 2-18-4-2; Tully, Pat, 
1-1-3-0 ; Turner, Aaron P., 0-4-2-0 ; Turner, Bruce, 0-3-0-0 ; 
Turner, Thomas, 0-3-0-0. 

Ulsas, Charles F., 2-3-0-0; Urlage, Richard, 0-0-2-0. 

VanArsdall, Fred. 0-0-2-0 ; Vance, Earl G.. 3-11-0-0 ; Vander- 
griff. Gene, 0-12-2-3 ; VanHoose, Edgar N., 1-21-3-1 ; Van- 
Hoose. Jimmy L., 1-15-3-1 ; VanMeter, Kaye Don, 0-2-6-1 ; 
VanZant, Jim, 8-13-0-0 ; Varble, William E., 12-24-6-4 ; Varner, 
Ray G., 10-12-4-1; Vice, Cliff, Jr., 1-1-2-0; Vinson, Ray T., 
8-] 1-1-0. 

Waide, Harry, 2-11-2-1; Waldon, Tot, 18-20-1-0; Walke, Glenn 
R., 0-1-0-0; Walker, Donald C, 1-8-2-0; Walker, Paul R., 
2-7-0-1 ; Wallace, James H., 0-2-0-1 ; Wallen, Edgar, 0-4-0-0 ; 
Wallen, Howard W., 2-1-0-0 ; Walters, Jim. 0-0-2-0 ; Wanchic, 
Nicholas, 20-26-1-4 ; Ward, Jackie D., 0-12-6-0 ; Warner, Mar- 



vin A., 1-0-0-0 ; Waters, Allen D., 0-2-0-0 ; Watkins, Paul 
Douglas, 0-0-1-0; Watts, Franklin, 1-0-1-0; Watts, Shirley, 
1-3-2-1 ; Weaver, B. H., 9-27-7-2 ; Weaver, Ray, 8-26-4-2 ; Webb, 
Lonard, 0-2-4-0 ; Webb, Oren H., 3-4-0-0 ; Weber, John, 7-3-3-1 ; 
Weisbrodt, Paul E., 18-29-2-1 ; Welch, John H.. 0-7-5-4 ; Welch, 
Ralph W., 20-23-5-4; Welch, Thomas P., 0-2-0-0; Wells, Mil- 
ford. 22-18-8-8 ; Wesche, James Allen, 2-9-3-1 ; Westerfield, 
Glenn, 2-6-6-1 ; Westhoff, Robert A., 0-4-2-3 ; Whalen, William 
C. 1-4-2-0 ; Whedbee, Melville, 5-9-0-1 ; Whipple, Lloyd G., 
0-5-0-0 ; Whitaker, James H., 0-2-0-0 ; White, David, 7-31-5-0 ; 
White, James D., 2-2-0-0 ; White, James "Pete", 16-8-2-1 ; 
White, William Jason, 2-5-2-0; Wigginton, Al, Sr., 0-1-0-0; 
Wilco.K, Ursal R., 1-4-0-0 ; Willey, Harold, 1-1-0-0 ; Williams, 
Bob, 1-9-3-0 ; Williams, James H., 2-23-6-1 : Williams, Roger, 
12-32-6-0: Willis, Robert A., 2-13-2-0; Wilson, Burnell Zeke, 
0-1-0-1 ; Wilson. H. G., 0-2-0-3 ; Wilson, Irvin, 1-2-0-0 ; Wilson, 
Jack R., 9-13-0-1; Wilson. Raymond B., 0-2-1-0; Wilson, Mar- 
tin Wayne, 0-1-0-0 ; Winchester, Roy L., 17-21-4-1 ; Winfrey, 
Shelby, 22-27-8-4 ; Wingfield, Felix G., 4-2-0-0 ; Wirtz, Howard, 
2-4-0-0; Wise, Billy V., 20-7-3-2; Wise. Jack, 39-15-4-2; Witt, 
Fred, 0-0-1-0 ; Womack, William H., 2-9-4-0 ; Wood, H. Phillip, 
1-3-6-2 ; Wood, Kenneth C, 1-1-0-1 ; Woods, Clyde M.. 4-5-1-0 ; 
Woods, Fairce O.. 9-3-0-0 ; Woodward, Durwood, 0-10-4-1 ; Wray, 
Darrel, 0-2-4-3; Wright, Ben H., 1-0-0-0; Wright, Billy Joe, 
3-22-4-0; Wright, H. W., Jr., 0-4-1-1; Wright, Paul. 3-8-2-1; 
Wurtz, Emil. 2-3-0-0. 

Yates. Bertheal, 0-2-2-0 ;Yates. Virgil, 
D., 3-13-5-1 ; Yeary, William H., Jr., 3 
15-11-2-0; Youtsey, Norman, 0-1-0-0. 

Zody, William Thurman, 0-7-3-0. 



OHiciaVs Ratings on Sportsmanship K. H. S. A. A. 

Member Schools in Basketball, 1958-1959 



Adair County 

AdairviUe 

Ahrens Trade 

Allen County 

Almo 

Alvaton 

Anderson 

Annville Institute. 

Ashland 

Atherton 

Attacks 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin Tracy 

Auxier 



Ballard Memorial- 



ille- 



Barbo 
Bardstown_ 

Bardstown Training 

Bate 

Beaver Dam 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Benham 

Benton 

Berea 

Betsy Layne 

Black Star 

Blaine 

Bloomfield 

Booker T. Washington. 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bawling Green 

Boyd County 

Bracken County 

Breathitt 

Breckinridge Co 

Breckinridge Tng 



Br 



sville 



Bryan Statii 

Buckeye 

Buckhorn___ 

Bunche 

Burgin. 



Bu 



iide- 





COACH 




OTHER 


SCHOOL 




CROWD 


1 




TEAM 










OFFICIALS 










1 






K 


G 


F 


P 


E G F 


1* 1 


E 


<i 


F 


P 


E 


G F 


48 


10 


1 


2 


52 


6 


1 


1 


50 


8 








62 


8 


1 


39 


8 


1 


1 


39 


10 








33 


13 


2 


1 


36 


11 


2 


40 


11 


1 





41 


9 


1 





35 


13 


3 


1 


36 


11 


4 


46 


4 








46 


4 








44 


6 


1 





46 


4 





19 


16 


2 





24 


12 








17 


9 


5 


5 


23 


9 


3 


39 


9 


4 


1 


46 


7 








41 


9 


2 


1 


39 


7 


2 


35 


2 


1 





35 


5 








34 


6 








34 


4 





19 


18 


3 


3 


27 


14 


3 


1 


22 


18 


3 


1 


20 


13 


9 


47 


3 








44 


6 








36 


9 


4 





43 


6 





3« 


13 


3 


2 


40 


10 


2 





30 


21 


3 





31 


21 


2 


33 


2 





1 


33 


2 


1 





33 


2 


1 





33 


1 


1 


56 


4 








56 


4 








48 


12 








62 


4 





3ft 


20 


2 


2 


40 


15 


1 


1 


35 


20 


3 


1 


32 


24 


3 


29 


10 


1 





32 


8 








25 


12 


2 


1 


29 


11 





21 


7 





1 


23 


6 








21 


6 


2 





26 


2 


1 


21 


23 


11 


3 


30 


27 


1 





21 


29 


8 





20 


27 


9 


33 


5 


1 





35 


4 








29 


4 


6 


1 


33 


4 


1 


48 


4 








48 


4 








47 


3 


2 





47 


4 


1 


24 


20 


4 


2 


30 


18 





1 


21 


26 


1 


2 


25 


27 


1 


27 


11 








28 


10 








18 


19 


1 





21 


16 


1 


IB 


12 


5 





25 


8 








15 


17 


1 





16 


17 





60 


5 








56 


3 


1 





47 


11 





1 


63 


4 


1 


40 


13 


1 


1 


60 


9 








42 


16 


1 





44 


12 


1 


20 


10 


9 


1 


21 


13 


4 


2 


18 


14 


7 





19 


13 


8 


46 


13 


3 





49 


13 








44 


15 


3 





41 


19 


2 


38 


24 


4 


1 


49 


18 








36 


24 


6 





37 


19 


9 


fl7 


3 


1 


1 


67 


1 


3 





66 


3 


3 





63 


5 


4 


23 


3 


2 


1 


27 


1 


1 





22 


6 





1 


27 


2 





44 


11 


1 


1 


49 


7 


1 





47 


9 








47 


7 


2 


19 


6 


7 


4 


27 


6 


1 





23 


8 


4 





27 


6 


2 


29 


7 


2 


3 


36 


4 


1 


1 


29 


9 


2 


1 


28 


7 


4 


:H5 


6 








35 


6 








32 


9 








35 


5 





32 


7 





1 


37 


3 








30 


7 


2 





33 


6 


1 


41 


9 








44 


7 








41 


8 


1 





37 


12 





61 


13 








60 


12 








66 


16 


1 





60 


14 


1 


51 


7 





1 


54 


4 








44 


13 


1 





47 


11 


1 


40 


7 


2 


1 


43 


7 








37 


1 


1 





36 


11 


2 


45 


14 


2 





61 


7 


2 





38 


17 


3 


2 


40 


17 


3 


51 


17 


2 


1 


48 


21 





1 


46 


21 


2 


2 


49 


19 





45 


12 


2 





49 


9 


1 





44 


11 


3 


1 


48 


10 


1 


47 


6 





2 


47 


7 





1 


37 


10 


2 


6 


42 


10 


3 


46 


2 


1 





47 


2 







45 


3 








41 


7 





44 


9 


1 


2 


49 


8 








35 


12 


6 


4 


38 


12 


3 


33 


11 








33 


6 








36 


6 


2 





37 


6 


1 


37 


9 


1 





41 


6 








35 


8 


1 





36 


8 


2 


33 


13 


2 


2 


43 


7 








23 


17 


7 


3 


28 


16 


6 


54 


U 








53 


11 








46 


19 


1 





49 


16 


1 


10 


7 


5 


14 


26 


9 


1 





22 


12 


2 





19 


10 


6 


21 


3 


4 


1 


20 


12 


1 





17 


10 


6 





14 


7 


7 


37 


9 


1 





38 


9 








31 


16 


1 





34 


13 





34 


11 


1 





40 


4 








32 


11 


1 





35 


7 


4 


33 


17 


2 


3 


37 


12 


6 





30 


14 


6 


5 


34 


11 


5 


41 


4 


5 


7 


49 


6 


1 


1 


44 


6 


4 


4 


44 


8 


2 


35 


16 








38 


12 








24 


23 


3 


1 


31 


19 


1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Page Nine 



Butler (Shivley).. 

Butier County 

Caldwell County^ 

Calhoun 

Camargo 

Campbell County_ 

CampbelJsburg 

Campbellsville 

Camp Dick Robin 

Caneyville 

Carlisle 

Carlisle County 

Carr Creek 

CarroUton 

Carter 

Catlettsburg 



Centertown 

Central (Clinton) 

Central (, Louisville) 

Central City 

Chandler's Chapel 

Charleston 

Clark County 

Clarkson 

Clay 

Clay County 

Clifty 

Clinton County 

College 

Combs Memorial 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covington Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden County 

Crofton 

Cuba 

Cub Run 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County (Burkesville) _ 

Cynthiana 

Dalton_ 



Da 



'ille 



County 

Springs 

Dayton 

Deming 

DeSales 

Dixie Heights 

Dixon 

Dorton 

Dotson 

Douglass (Henderson ) 
Douglass ( Lexington ) 

Douglass (Murray) 

Drakesboro 

Drakesboro CommL 

DuBois 

Dunbar ( Mayf ield) 

Dunbar (Morganfield) 

duPont Manual 

Durrett 

Earlington 

East Benham 

Eastern 

East Main Street 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Catholic 
Elkhorn City 



ty_ 



Estill County- 

Eubank 

Evarts 

Ezel 

Fairview 



Fain 



uth- 



Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Ferguson 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Flaherty 

Flat Gap 

Fleming County 

Fleming-Neon 

Fords ville 

Forkland 

Fort Knox 

Foundation ( Berea) _ 
Frankfort 



1 18 


1 


1 12 


S 


1 6 


3 


1 11 


1 


1 9 


9 


1 32 


4 


1 18 


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1 2 





1 3 





1 14 


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1 11 





1 13 


2 


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1 15 


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1 24 


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13 1 


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1 1 


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1 


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1 


10 


^1 



OTHER SCHOOL 
OFFICIALS 



41 


1 25 


37 


1 9 


37 


1 12 


36 


1 24 


32 


1 14 


36 


1 31 


Zl 


1 18 


33 


1 9 


33 


1 3 


31 


1 16 


33 


1 12 


36 


1 15 


37 


1 2 


17 


17 


26 


1 17 


30 


14 


3x 


9 1 


37 


17 


16 


8 1 


32 


23 1 


46 


25 1 


34 


5 1 


37 


12 1 


74 


9 1 


27 


22 1 


31 


27 1 


62 


li 1 


24 


24 1 


38 


24 1 


36 


6 1 


26 


8 1 


31 


8 1 


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6 1 


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27 1 


38 


13 1 


25 


18 1 


52 


14 1 


40 


13 1 


24 


9 1 


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2 1 


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16 1 


36 


13 1 


26 


19 1 


38 


14 1 


38 


2U 1 


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18 1 


55 


19 1 


41 


14 1 


26 


22 1 


46 


23 1 


31 


17 1 


47 


8 1 


11 


1 1 


20 


6 1 


14 


14 1 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Frederick-Fraize 

Fredericktown 

Fredonia 

Fulgham 

Fulton 

Fulton County 

Gallatin County 

Gamaliel 

Garrett 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Glendale 

Good Shepherd 

Graham 

Grant County 

Greensburg 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Guthrie 

Haldeman 

Hall 

Hanson 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hawesville 

Hazard 

Hazel 

Hazel Green Acad 

Hazel Green (.East Bernstadt). 

Heath 

Hellier 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henderson Settlement 

Henry Central 

Henry Clay 

Highlands 

High Street 

Hindman 

Hiseville 

Hitchens 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Holy Family 

Holy Name 

Hopkinsville 

Horse Branch 

Howevalley 

Hughes-Kirk 

Huston ville 

Inez 

Irvine 

Irvington 

Jackson 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Johns Creek 

Junction City 

Kingdom Come 

Kirksey 

Knott Co 

Knox Central 

Kyrock 

Lacy 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

LaRue County 

Leatherwood 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County 

Leitchfield 

Leslie County 

Letcher 

Lewisburg 

Lewisport 

Lexington Catholic 

Liberty _ _ 

Lily 

Lincoln (Franklin) 

Lincoln (Middlesboro) 

Lincoln fPaducah) 

Lincoln (Stanford) 

Lincoln Inst. (Lincoln Ridge). 

Livermore 

Livingston Central 

Livingston 



37 I 
30 I 
34 I 



9 I 
9 I 
U 1 



9 I 
14 I 
19 I 









31 


14 


1 


1 


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7 


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8 


7 





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25 


26 


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24 


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1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Page Eleven 



Lloyd Memorial 

London 

Lone Jack 

Lone Oak 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day- 
Louis vlile Male 

Lowes 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

Lynn Grove 



ale- 



Lyn 

Lyon County 

McCreary County 

McDowell 

McKee 

McKell 

McKinney 

Mackville 

Madison Central 

Madison Model 

Madisonville 

Marrowbone 

Martin 

Mason 

Mayfield 

May's Lick 

Maysville 

Maytown 

Meade Co 

Meade Memorial 

Memorial iHardyville) _. 
Memorial ( Way nesburg ) 

Menifee County 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middleburg 

Middlesboro 

Midway 

Millersburg Mili. Inst._ 

Million 

Minerva 

Montgomery Co 

Monticello 

Morgan 

Morgan Co 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Central 

MuUins 

Munfordville 

Murray 

Murray Training 

Nancy 

Nebo 

New Concord 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas Co 

North Marshall 

North Middletown 

North Warren 

Oil Springs 

Oldham Co 

Old Ky. Home 

Olive Hill 

Olmstead 

Oneida Inst. 

Orangeburg 



Ov 



Co.. 



Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Owingsville 

Owsley County 

Padueah Tilghman 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Parksville 

P. L. Dunbar (Lexington) _ 

Pembroke 

Perry ville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Pine Knot 

Pineville 

Pleasant View 

Pleasureville 

Poplar Creek 



16 


6 


17 





11 


2 


8 
19 


4 
1 


11 

7 


1 
1 


17 


5 


SI 





16 


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3 


S 
16 


1 
1 


12 
12 


1 
2 


16 


2 


7 






3 I 
I 

n I 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Powell County 

Prestonsburg 

Prichard 

Providence 

Pulaski County 

Raceland 

Red Bird 

Reidland 

Richardsville 

Rineyville 

Riverview 

Rockholds 

Rosen wald (Barbourvilie) 

Rosenwald (Harlanj 

Rosen wald (Lebanon l 

Rosenwald (Madisonville) 

Rosenwald (Providence) 

Rosenwald-Dunbar (Nicholasville). 

Rowan County 

Russell 

Russell Co 

RussellviUe 

Sacramento 

St. Agatha Acad 

St. Agnes 

St. Aloysius 

St. Augustine 1 

St. Benedict 

St. Camillus Acad 

St. Catherine 

St. Charles 

St. Francis 

St. Henry 

St. Joseph (Bowling Green) 

St. Joseph Prep. (Bardstown) 

St. Mary (Alexandria) 

St. Marys Acad. (Paducah) 

St. Patricks 

St. Thomas 

St. Vincent Acad 

St. Xavier 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 

Scott Co 

Scottsville 

Sebree 

Sedalia 

Seneca 

Sharpsburg 

Shawnee 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 



Simon Kenton 

Simpson ville 

Sinking Fork 

Slaughters 

Somerset 

Sonora 

South Christian 

Southern 

South Hopkins 

South Marshall 

South Portsmouth 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Stearns 

Stinnett Settlement — 

Sturgis 

Sunfish 

Symsonia 

Taylor County 

Taylorsville 

Temple Hill 

Todd County 

Todd Co. Trng 

Tollesboro 

Tompkins ville 

Trigg County 

Trimble County 

Trinity 

Tyner 

University 

Utica 

Valley 

Van ceburg- Lewis Co— 

Van Lear 

Versailles 

Vine Grove 

Virgia 

Waddy 

Waggener 

Wallins 



11 I 
11 I 
19 I 



3 





H 





12 





7 


2 


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14 


3 


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4 


8 


1 


6 


2 


8 


2 


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8 


3 


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24 I 
33 I 



42 


23 


2K 


4 


15 


10 


21 


4 


29 


15 


23 


5 


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8 


33 


8 


30 


21 


32 


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47 


26 


30 


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21 


13 


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27 


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7 


3ft 


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21 


26 


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10 


41 


13 


41 


10 


29 


17 


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13 


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n 


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10 


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34 1 





29 1 





32 1 


1 


35 1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Page Thirteen 



Walton-Vernon 

Warfield 

Warren County 

Wayland 

Wayne County 

Western (Owensboro) 

Western (Paris) 

Western (Sinai J 

West Main Street (Lynch) 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

William Grant 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Williamsburg 

Winchester 

Wingo 

Wolfe County 

Woodbine 

Wurtland 



1 OTHER SCHOOL 



31 


21 




37 
4fi 


6 
10 




34 


2 




53 


9 




34 


7 


1 



1 




OFFICIALS 










1 








P 1 


E 


G F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


P 1 


E 


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F 


s 


4S 


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2 





36 


25 







41 


23 


1 1 


(1 


36 


9 








31 


12 







29 


10 


6 1 


(1 


47 


X 





2 


45 


11 




» 


53 


4 





3 


37 


1 


u 


1 


27 


7 




2 


33 


5 





1 


62 


12 








46 


15 




1 


47 


16 





1) 


39 


4 








29 


11 







31 


7 


4 1 





21 


16 








19 


17 







20 


15 


1 1 





40 


6 


1 





35 


8 







35 


10 


1 


1 


21 


11 








24 


7 




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23 


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29 


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26 


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27 


3 


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1 


1 





36 


4 




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2 


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59 


23 


1 





52 


24 







50 


27 


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2 


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7 





4 


32 


10 




2 


34 


8 


4 


10 


38 


19 








31 


23 




1 


28 


16 


7 





29 


15 








24 


19 







25 


18 





2 


56 


5 


2 


1 


55 


8 







51 


8 


4 


1 


34 


8 


1 





26 


14 







33 


8 


2 


3 


35 


9 


1 





31 


10 




2 


33 


8 


2 


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10 


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26 


17 







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1 



Three hundred twenty-si 
4,690 boys were insured, and 
$31,740.27, being paid. 

School 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Annville 

Ashland 

Ashland 

Ashland 

Ashland 

Ashland 

Ashland 

Ashland 

Ashland 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Atherton 

Auburn 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Barbourville 

Barbourville 

Barbourville 

Barbourville 

Barbourville 

Barbourville 

Barbourville 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Beechwood 

Beechwood 

Beechwood 

Beechwood 

Beechwood 

Pell County 



Report of Insurance Claims 

schools insured their athletes under the K. U.S.A. A. Protection F 
n other sports 6,733. Twelve hundred ninety-two claims were si 



Claimant Injury Amount Paid 

Davis Briscoe Fractured fibula $ 35.00 

.Connie Carlton X-ray 10.00 

.Tommy Smith Broken finger. X-ray 17.50 

.Tommy Smith Laceration - suture 5.00 

.Ronnie Thornsberry Laceration - suture 5.00 

Major Wheat, Jr Laceration - suture 5.00 

.Truman Hays X-ray 11.00 

. Kendall Bocard Laceration - suture 5.00 

.Monte Campbell X-ray 12.00 

. Herbie Conley Broken teeth 22.00 

. Leroy Dobbins X-ray 10.00 

.William Jordan Knee injury (spec.al) 15.00 

.Joel Millikan Dislocated toe. X-ray 14.00 

.James Sloan X-ray 6.00 

. Arlie Wheeler X-ray 5.00 

..Jeff Banks X-ray 10.00 

.. Ronnie Barrett Broken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

..Ed Coleman Wrist injury (special) 40.50 

..Ed Coleman X-ray 10.00 

..Jerry Cutsinger Broken nose 11.00 

..Rusty Doerr Dislocated knee. X-ray 25.90 

..Johnny Fox Knee injury (special) 193.38 

.-Steve Grissom Laceration - suture 5.0 i 

-Todd Hubley Head injury (special) 86.25 

..Geoff Morris Neck injury (special) 33.50 

--Geoff Morris Broken finger, X-ray 20.00 

-Ted Newman Fractured metatarsal. X-ray 30.30 

..Ted Newman Hand injury (special) 19.65 

..Ted Newman Hand injury (special) 16.93 

..Hugh Peterson Arm injury (special) 37.00 

.-Chuck Schlinger Wrist injury (special) 35.60 

..Duane Schwartz X-ray 7.00 

.-Duane Schwartz X-ray 4.00 

.-Roy Smith Laceration - suture 5. 00 

.-Roy Smith Laceration - suture 5.00 

-Jim Stockton Laceration - suture 6.00 

--Jim Stockton Laceration - suture 5.00 

-Monte Tiller , X-ray 6.00 

-Jim Wood X-ray 8.00 

.Minor Woodward Knee injury (special) 18.00 

: Wright Broken teeth 40.00 



-Eddie Schweitzer Laceration - suture 

.-Harold Carey X-ray 

.-Glenn Disney Loss of tooth 

.-Glenn Disney Broken tooth. X-ray 

.-Phillip Fox X-ray 

..Phillip Fox Loss of tooth, X-ray_ 

.-Robert Harp X-ray 

.-Beverly Helton Loss of tooth 

-Charles Sink Kidney injury (special). 



.Ov 



Br 



5.00 
15.00 

2.00 
22.00 
15.00 
27.00 

5.00 

4.00 
84.15 



.X-ray 10.00 



.Owen Brown X-ray 6.00 

.Jackie Doyle Laceration - suture 5.00 

.Grant Fulkerson Laceration - suture 5.00 

-William Greenwell X-ray 15.00 

-Edwin Howell X-ray 4.00 

-Edwin Howell Rib injury (special) 23.63 

-Douglas Hubbard X-ray 6.00 

.James Parker X-ray 6.00 

.Jacob Wommer X-ray 6.00 

-Bill Dawson X-ray 15.00 

-Richard Stevenson Finger injury (special) 15.50 

-Dick Thomas X-ray 10.00 

-Dick Thomas Laceration -suture 4.50 

-Dick Thomas Dental injury (special) 25.00 

-Clofus Barnett Knee injury (special) 167.21} 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Bell County Gale Robbins Broken teeth 40.00 

Bell County Roy Wilson Broken teeth 40.00 

Bellevue Ken Alexander X-ray 10.00 

Bellevue Frank Bruns Laceration - suture 5,00 

Bellevue Peter Heister Nose injury (special) 131.03 

Bellevue Mike Lawrence Shoulder injury (special) 41.75 

Bellevue Fred Rose Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Benham Roscoe Brock Loss of teeth 50.00 

Benham Elijah Clore X-ray 5.00 

Benham Larry Davis X-ray 7.60 

Benham Larry Flanary X-ray 5.00 

Benham Larry Flanary X-ray 6.00 

Benham Ed Gladson Loss of tooth 25.00 

Benham Mike Hodge Shoulder injury (special) 27,18 

Benham Wiley Hodge X-ray 8,00 

Benham William Hughes X-ray 6.00 

Benham Marvin Messer X-ray 10.00 

Benham Terry Pace X-ray 11.25 

Benham Paul Simpson X-ray 6.00 

Benham Ray Simpson Laceration - suture 5,00 

Benton Mike Morgan X-ray 6.00 

Berea Leroy Brimmer Kidney injury (special) 116.00 

Berea Lindsey Brock Finger injury (special) 146,40 

Berea Maurice Davidson Dental injury (special) 62.00 

C. V. Foley, Jr X-ray 5.00 

Bobby Gibson X-ray 5.00 

Bobby Himes Laveration-suture 5.00 

Robert Himes Dental injury 10.50 

Robert Johnson X-ray 6.00 

Kenneth Spencer Broken finger. X-ray 15.00 

Berea Boyd Williams X-ray 6.00 

Black Star Clinton Cornelius X-ray lO.CO 

Black Star Clarkie Mayfield X-ray 7.50 

Black Star Bobby Noe.. __ X-ray 10.00 

Black Star Calvin Scott X-ray 7.50 

Black Star Mason Stewart X-ray 10.00 

Bloomfield Donald Hahn Broken tooth 7,00 

Boone County Roger Grimes Fractured fibula 50,00 

Boone County Roy Hoffman Fractured radius 40,00 

Boone County Frank Miller X-ray 6,00 

Boone County Ralph Orchelle Laceration - suture 4.00 

Boone County Curt Poland X-ray 6,00 

Bowling Green Blake Clark Back injury (special) 17,50 

Bowling Green Wayne Copas X-ray 10,00 

Bowling Green Elvis Donaldson X-ray 6,00 

Tommy Dunn X-ray 6,00 

Louie Hagan X-ray 6,00 

Billy Haynes X-ray 10.00 

Terry Hodges X-ray 6,00 

Norman Lewis X-ray 10.10 



Bowling Green- 
Bowling Green- 
Bowling Green-. 
Bowling Green- 
Bowling Green- 
Bowling Green-. 
Bowlnig Green- 
Bowlnig Green- 
Bowlnig Green- 
Bracken County _._ . . 

Breckinridge County Tommy Brite X-ray 

Breckinridge County Tommy Brite Laceration 

Breckinridge County Joe Conder Laceration 



Bob Stamps X-ray 6.00 

Wayne Turner Loss of tooth 28.00 

Devoye Upton X-ray 10.00 

Donald Walker Laceration - suture 5.00 

Leon Woosley X-ray 12.00 

Ronnie Case X-ray 10.00 

20.00 

suture 5.00 

suture. 



5.00 

Breckinridge County Jack Jolly X-ray 8.00 

Bristow Harel Carrier Broken Thumb, X-ray 16.00 

Brodhead Lloyd Caldwell X-ray 15,00 

Brodhead Larry Harris X-ray 6,00 

Brodhead Darrell Stevens Dental injury 8,00 

Brownsville James Lindsey Laceration - suture 5,00 

Buckeye Elmer Hall Laceration - suture 5,00 

Burgin Ronald Crutchfield X-ray 12,00 

Bush Ferrell Asher Pulled tendon, X-ray 27,50 

Bush Willlard Bowling Knee injury (special) 29,25 

Bush Darrell Deaton X-ray 9,00 

Bush Harold Turner Broken finger 5,00 

Butler Sammy Butler Dislocated finger 9,00 

Butler Sammy Butler X-ray 5,00 

Butler Sammy Butler Dislocated shoulder 13,00 

Butler Paul Carter Leg injury (special) 77,50 

Butler Raymond Cary Leg injury (special) 131,28 

Butler Leon Conway X-ray 8,00 

Butler Leon Conway Dental injury (special! 37.50 

Butler Eddie Crum X-ray 5.00 

Butler Troy Curtis Broken tooth, X-ray 22,00 

Butler Morris Hall Broken tooth 18,00 

Butler Charles Simpson Broken thumb. X-ray 16,00 

Butler William Yates Arm injury (special) 23.00 

Butler Eddie Beck Foot and Back injury (special) 258.00 



Butler County- 
Butler County- 
Butler County- 
Butler County- 
Butler County- 
Campbellsville- 
Campbellsville.. 
Campbellsville. 
Campbellsvilie.. 
Campbellsville-. 
Campbellsville- 
Campbellsville- 
Campbellsville- 
ramphellsville- 



■ Frank Cardwell Laceration 

-Albert Porter Laceration 

-Charles Smith Hand inju 

-Wesley Smith Laceration 

-Jimmy West Laceration 

.-Eddie Claycomb X-ray 

-Greg Crabtree Broke 

-Tommy Harrison X-ray 

.Steve Horner X-ray 

-James Murrah Laceration - suture 5.00 

-John Newcomb Loss of tooth 25,00 

..Danny Rose X-ray 12.00 

-Eugene Shively Fractured radius 35,00 

..Earl Thrasher Laceration - suture Ifl.OO 



suture 5.00 

suture 5.00 

(special) 19.25 

suture 6.00 

suture 5.0C 

10.00 

teeth 15.00 

6.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Page Fifteen 



Camp Dick Robinson Burland Burdett Leg injury (special) 

Caneyville Bobby Collins X-ray 

Caneyville Clifton Cummings Dislocated finger 

Caneyville Ronald H. Fentress Laceration - suture 

Caneyville Charles B. Franks X-ray 

Caneyville Dale McPherson Laceration - suture 

Caneyville Lester Morris Pulled tendon 

Caneyville Hellard Woosley X-ray 

Carlisle Floyd Bussell Arm injury (special) 

Carlisle Elva D. Clark Fractured metatarsal, X-ray_ 

Carlisle Clarence Compton X-ray 

Carlisle Roy Dotson X-ray 

Carlisle Jerry Henry Shoulder injury (special) 

Carlisle Donald B. Hollar Shoulder injury (special) 

Carlisle John Johnson X-ray 

Carlisle Duane Kelley X-ray 

Carlisle Jo - - - 

Carlisle 01: 

Carlisle Jii 

Carlisle Sti 

Carlisle County Ja 

Carlisle County. 



Ratliff Wrist injruy (special) - 

?r Smart Laceration - suture 

nie G. Vanlandingham Dislocated shoulder 

ley Wilson X-ray 

3S E. Pearson X-ray 

^ Todd Fractured radius 

Carrollton Wayne Pearson X-ray 

Catlettsburg Tobby Butler X-ray 

Catlettsburg Albert Crank Ankle injury (special) 

Catlettsburg Chandis Ferguson X-ray 

Catlettsburg Larry Howell Spine injury (special) _ 

Catlettsburg Johnny Hughes X-ray 

Catlettsburg Marvin Lewis Dental injury 

Catlettsburg David Ross X-ray 

Catlettsburg Joe Stewart Leg injury (special) — 



adius 



Tom Workman Fractured : 

Haskell Borden X-ray 

Wayne Gentry X-ray 

Caverna Joel McCubbin Laceration - suture 

Centi-al Victor Bender Fractured metatarsal. X-ray — 

Central Bobby Davis Foot injury (special) 

Central Bobby Davis Dental injury 

Central Richard Murray Dental injury 

Central Robert Tinsley Loss of tooth. X-ray 

Central Robert Tinsley Leg injury (special) 

Central City Ben Mac Wolfe Fractured metacarpal, X-ray- 
Chandlers Chapel Donald Bailey Laceration - suture 

Clarkson Paul Hoi-n Fractured tibia & fibula 

College Billy Bray X-ray 

College Billy Bray Broken tooth. X-ray 

College Jim Huggins Loss of tooth. X-ray 

College . Mike Sherrell Laceration - suture 

Corbin Rodney Barton Loss of teeth 

Corbin Jesse Grant Arm injury (special) 

Corbin Amos Miller Laceration - suture 

Corbin Lanny Myers Broken nose 

Corbin Fred Rader X-ray 

Corbin Fred Rader Broken teeth 

Clinton County James C. Brown Laceration -suture 

Clinton County Jackie Latham Ankle injury (special) 

Crittenden County Larry A. Easley Broken tooth. X-ray 

Crittenden County Steve Perryman X-ray 

Crittenden County Jerry Woodall Dental injury (special) 

Crofton James Wilson Knee injury (special) 

Cumberland Travis Born Fractured metacai-pal. X-ray- 

Cumberland Bobby Creech Laceration - suture 

Cumberland Larry Jarvis Fractured tibia 

Cumberland John S. Petrey Fractured radius 

Cumberland Philip Wigington Loss of teeth 

Cynthiana Richard Bell Laceration - suture 



86.10 

5.00 
10.00 

6.00 

5.00 

5.00 

4.00 

6.00 
50.25 
32.50 

6.00 

6.00 
44.25 
44.25 

6.00 

6.00 
34.50 

5.00 
35.00 
10.00 

6.00 
40.00 

6.00 

6.00 
38.75 

6.00 
55.53 

6.00 
50.00 

6.00 
25.50 
40.00 

6.00 
12.00 

5.00 
31.00 
45.00 
50.00 
50.00 
29.00 
21.00 
26.00 

5.00 
90.00 
10.00 
22.00 
29.00 

5.00 
50.00 
70.65 

5.00 
10.00 

8.00 
50.00 

5.00 
92.40 
22.00 
12.00 
31.00 
168.60 
31.00 

5.00 
50.00 
40.00 
50.00 

6.00 



TRACK MEET— 

(Continued from Inside Cover) 

Discus — 

1. Hayden — St. Joseph 

2. Herfel-— Highlands 

3. Jewell— Trinity 

4. Mattingly — Trinity 

5. Carlyle — Warren County 

Distance: 141' 51/2" 
Broad Jump — 

1. Napier — Manual 

2. McKenzie — Ashland 

3. Lee — Catlettsburg 

4. Williams — Frankfort 

5. Emmons — Highlands 

Distance: 21' 6%" 
High Jump — 

1. Lee — Catlettsburg 

2. Blackwell — Bryan Sattion 
2. Wehr — Atherton 



4. Myers — M. M. I. 

5. Taylor— High Street 
5. Knox— M.M.I. 

5. Glass — Louisville Central 
Height: 5'11%" 



TOTAL POINTS 

Hicrhlands 3.3 

Trinity 29 

Paducah Tilshman 15 1/6 

Bourbon County 12 

St. Joseph Prep 12 

Ashland 11 

Eastern 10 1/2 

Lafayette 10 

Southern 10 

M. M. I 9 

Catlettsburg 9 

Danville 9 

Manual 9 



1/3 



Newport 

Atherton 

Covington Holmes _ 
Male 

Hookinsville 

Valley 

Caldwell County 

Waggener 

Bryan Station 

St. Xavier 

Lebanon Rosenwald 

Raceland 

Shawnee 

Meade County 

Frankfort 

Henderson County _ 

Warren County 

B. G. High Street - 
Louisville Central _ 

Hazel Green 

Henderson City — 



8 1/2 
8 1/2 



1/6 



1/2 



1/6 
1/6 



1/3 
1/3 
1/6 
1/6 



Page Sixteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 

Cynthiana John Biancke X-ray 2.00 

Cynthiana James Collier Dislocated elbow 25.00 

Cynthiana Harry Custard Dislocated ankle 25.00 

Cynthiana Robert Donovan X-ray 12.00 

Cynthiana William Giles Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Cynthiana John Keith Knee injury (special) 22.00 

Cynthiana Thomas Stanley Dislocated finger 10.00 

Cynthiana James William Broken teeth 47.60 

Danville Larry Boyd Laceration - suture 5.00 

Danville Harold Chambers Dental injury (special) 72.50 

Danville Claude Hoffmeyer Broken finger, X-ray 22.00 

Danville Claude Hoffmeyer X-ray 6.00 

Danville Elmer Jackson Laceration - suture 5.00 

Danville Hughes Jackson X-ray 10.00 

Danville Johnny Jackson Dislocated shoulder 24.30 

Danville Johnny Jackson Broken finger 10.00 

Danville Orville Mace X-ray 10.00 

Danville Orville Mace X-ray 6.00 

Danville Marion Minor Finger injury (special) 16.00 

Danville Kenneth P'erce X-ray 8.00 

Danville Jerry Rankin X-ray 8.00 

Danville Buddy Sallee X-ray 8.00 

Danville Buddy Sallee X-ray 6.00 

Danville Tommy Taylor X-ray 12.00 

Danville Tommy Taylor X-ray 6.00 

Danville Roger Tully X-ray 10.00 

Danville Clyde Wise Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Daviess County Henry Crabtree Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Daviess County Eddie Harris Broken finger. X-ray 16.00 

Daviess County Rowland Pagan Neck injury (special) 39.95 

Dayton Eddie Bolser Kidney injury 25.00 

Dayton Bob Hayes Head injury (special) 22.50 

Dayton Phil Higgins Leg injury (special) 33.08 

Dayton Jerry Hoepher X-ray 10.00 

Dayton Tom Klette Fractured radius 25.00 

Combs Memorial James Scruggs _Loss of tooth 25.00 

^ Heights Ronald Bennett X-ray 10.00 

• Heights Bill Boese X-ray 20.00 

■ Heights Robert Browning _Loss of teeth 50.00 

^ Heights Ed Hamilton Loss of tooth 25.00 

• Heights Ronald Hobbs _ Broken tooth, X-ray 24.00 

• Heights David Hughes X-ray 12.50 

Dixie Heights David Hughes Loss of teeth 46.00 

Heights Robert Osborne X-ray 10.00 

Heights Mike Penticost X-ray 10.00 

Heights Carl Reese Knee injury (special) 150.00 

Dixie Heights Robert Schultz X-ray 10.00 

Heights Kim Ward Broken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

Heights Bob Ward Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Heights John White Dental injury (special) 50.00 

Dixon Morris Coffman Broken facings 10.00 

Dixon Jim Ramsey Dental injury (special) 65.50 

Drakesboro Community Wallace M. Martin X-ray 12.00 

Drakesboro Community Will H. Reynolds, Jr Elbow iniury (special) 303.46 

Dunbar Ronald Million Knee injury (special) 15.00 

Dunbar Harold Parker Leg injury (special) 60.25 

Dunbar Felix Scruggs X-ray 20.00 

Dunbar Herbert Washington Kidney-ruptured 21.00 

Dunham James Clark X-ray 12.00 

Dunham Charles Holyfield X-ray 12.00 

Dunham Johnny Osley X-ray 9.50 

Dunham Jimmy William Wrist injury (special) 61.00 

duPont Manual Rogen Annon X-ray 10.00 

duPont Manual Roger Baugh X-ray 7.50 

duPont Manual Robert A. Burch Fractured tibia 50.00 

duPont Manual Ranald Callahan X-ray 15.00 

duPont Manual James Cooksey Broken finger. X-ray 12.00 

duPont Manual William Ferriell X-ray 17.00 

duPont Manual Kenny Horn X-ray 7.50 

duPont Manual George Houchins X-ray 27.50 

duPont Manual Larry Keeling X-ray 10.00 

duPont Manual Sherman Lewis X-ray 10.00 

duPont Manual Sherman Lewis Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

duPont Manual Ronald Lutts X-ray 18.00 

duPont Manual Ronald Lutts Loss of tooth. X-ray 29.00 

duPont Manual Larry Morris X-ray 12.00 

duPont Manual Stephen Mumford X-ray 10.00 

duPont Manual David Nelson Broken teeth 40.00 

duPont Manual Ronnie Parkenson X-ray 27.00 

duPont Manual Robert Vettiner X-ray 10.00 

duPont Manual William White X-ray 10.00 

duPont Manual Homer Whiting X-ray 10.00 

Durrett Robert Allsmiller X-ray 20.00 

Durrett Rill Gruen Chipped tooth. X-ray 7.00 

Durrett William Gruen X-ray 20.00 

Durrett William Hadley X-ray 10.00 

Durrett Gilbert Hargan Dental injury (special) 47.50 

Durrett Kenneth Harvey Hip injury (special) 27.00 

Durrett Jon Hebel X-ray 20.00 

Durrett Howard Jarboe X-ray 10.00 

Durrett Dan Klein Broken finger. X-ray 20.00 

Durrett Morgan Mayer X-ray 12.00 

Durrett Keith Melcher Dislocated shoulder 10.00 

Durrett Roy Montford X-ray 6.00 

Durrett Gary Nally Leg injury (special) 78.25 

Durrett Mike Raddish X-ray ^ 6.00 

Durrett Terry Rudolph Broken nose 12.00 

Durrett Ricky Stiles Neck injury (special) 17.35 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 Page Seventeen 

Durrett Louis Thurman Dental injury (special) 45.00 

Durrett David Williams Broken tooth, X-ray 24.00 

Eastern John Baker X-ray 10.00 

Eastern Marion Coffey X-ray 6.00 

Eastern Marion Coffey X-ray 10.00 

Eastern Joe Creason X-ray 6.00 

Eastern Golda Eldridge Laceration - suture 5.00 

Eastern Jack English Dislocated finger 10.00 

Eastern Bill Erwin X-ray 6.00 

Eastern Steven Finley Fractured radius 40.00 

Eastern Nicholas Folchi Nose injury 40.75 

Eastern Mike Hardin X-ray 6.00 

Eastern Monty Horner Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Eastern John Huggins X-ray 10.00 

Eastern George S. McCarty Fractured femur 100.00 

Eastern Ralph Marksberry X-ray 6.00 

Eastern Albert G. Mullins X-ray 10.00 

Eastern Roger Orrell X-ray 6.00 

Eastern Fred Progner X-ray 8.00 

Eastern Vincent Tagliarino Knee injury (special) 500.00 

Eastern Main Street John Burnett Loss of teeth 50.00 

Eastern Main Street Donald Dizney X-ray V.50 

Eastern Main Street Rhudy Hillen X-ray 20.00 

Eastern Main Street Phillip Oakley Loss of teeth 60.00 

Eastern Main Street Jimmy Owens Leg injury (special) 36.50 

Elizabethtown Catholic Jim Hartlage Broken teeth 10.00 

Eminence Billy Hub Allen X-ray 5.00 

Eminence Gareth Hollar Broken finger. X-ray 22.00 

Eminence Eddie Prewitt X-ray 5.00 

Eminence Joe Rucker X-ray 12.50 

Eminence H. D. Wilson Laceration - suture 5.00 

Estill County Joe Lakes Dislocated knee 35.00 

Estill County Wilgus Wolfinbarger Broken finger. X-ray 20.00 

Evarts Orville Blair Back injury (special) 97.50 

Evarts Jessie Huskey Leg injury (special) BOO. 00 

Evarts Jack McPeek Knee injury (special) 251.00 

Evarts Jack Meeks Loss of tooth 25.00 

Evarts Ancil Thomas Dislocated shoulder 36.00 

Evarts Raymond Toby X-ray 6.00 

Ezel Asa Patrick Dental injury (special) 78.60 

Ezel Hollie E. Pieratt Loss of teeth 50.00 

Ezel Robert Pieratt X-ray 20.00 

Falmouth Joe E. Kearns Knee injury (special) 186.38 

Farmington Ben David Fuciua Fractured radius and ulna 67.00 

Farmington Grover Gardner X-ray 6.00 

Farmington Donald Pigg X-ray 10.00 

Ferguson Dolphus Price Laceration - suture 5.0*) 

Ferguson Glenn Richardson Knee injury (special) 172.20 

Fern Creek J. William Bailey X-ray 10-00 

Fern Creek Eddie Cleary X-ray 10.00 

Fern Creek Bobby Cox X-ray 7.50 

Fern Creek Bob Curtis X-ray 5.00 

Fern Creek Bob Curtis X-ray 6.00 

Fern Creek Jack Frick X-ray 6.00 

Fern Creek Tommy Hall X-ray 6.00 

Fern Creek David Harrod X-ray 10.00 

Fern Creek Bill Hess X-ray 6.00 

Fern Creek Bill Hess Loss of tooth 6.00 

Fern Creek Richard Humphrey X-ray 5.00 

Fern Creek Richard Humphrey X-ray 5.00 

Fern Creek Walter Larmee Dental injury (special) 36.50 

Fern Creek Walter Larmee Knee injury (special) 39.00 

Fern Creek Walter Larmee Laceration - suture 5.00 

Fern Creek Bob Lurie X-ray 6.00 

Fern Creek Jimmy Payne X-ray 10.00 

Fern Creek Gordon Thompson X-ray 6.00 

Fern Creek Gordon Thompson X-ray 6.00 

Fern Creek Jim Whitis Denatl injury (special) 53.00 

Flat Gap James Blevins X-ray 5.00 

Flat Gap Lowell LeMaster Broken tooth 15.00 

Fleming County Bill Collins X-ray 10.00 

Fleming County Paul Gray Dental injury (special) 62.50 

Frankfort Danny Blakeman X-ray 7.60 

Frankfort Charles Boyd X-ray 10.00 

Frankfort Billy Eddins Dental injury (special) 60.00 

Frankfort Shelby Roberts X-ray 10-00 

Frankfort Johnny Sergent X-ray _ 10.00 

Frankfort David Tate X-ray . . 10.00 

Frankl" " '" 

Frankl: 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl; 

Frankl 

Frankl 

Frankl 



County Tommy Crittenden X-ray 7.50 

1 County David Dearborn X-ray ^-00 

1 County Billy Jackson Dental injury (special) 115.00 

1 County Gerald Miller Laceration - suture 5.00 

I County Roy Murray Broken finger. X-ray 20.00 

I County Bobby Ragland Broken tooth S.OO 

1 County Ben Redden Fractured clavicle 30.00 

I County Leon Schroder Laceration - suture 5.00 

I County Kenneth Shauntee X-ray 0.00 

1 County Donald Tincher X-ray 1000 

i-Simpson Evan D. Cummings Broken finger 10.00 

i-Simpson Bobby Forshee X-ray 6.00 

-Simpson Jerry Jones Laceration - suture. X-ray 11-00 

.-Simpson Willard Kendall X-ray 6.00 

i-Simpson Ruddy Lowborn X-ray 0-00 

i-Simpson Tom K. Meador X-ray 6-00 

-Simpson Ronnie Mosley X-ray 6.00 

-Simpson John Palmer Dental injury (special) 35.00 

-Simpson James T. Starks X-ray __ _ 9-50 

Fulgham Edward Bowen X-ray _ _ - 10-00 



Page Eighteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 

Fulton Joe Bennett Laceration - suture 4.00 

Fulton Bill Burnette Fractured thumb 9.50 

Fulton Duncan Bushart Loss of tooth. X-ray 29.00 

Fulton Mike Calliham Fractured tibia 50.00 

Fulton Glenn Cook X-ray 6.00 

Fulton Charles Forrest X-ray 12.00 

Fulton Charles Forrest Loss of teeth 50.00 

Fulton Jerry House X-ray 6.00 

Fulton County Jerry Morrow X-ray 10.00 

Fulton County Kenneth Vowell Head injury (special) 15.00 

Gamaliel Billy Carder Laceration - suture 5.00 

Gamaliel Kenneth Downing Laceration - suture 5-00 

Georgetown Stanley Bruin Dislocated shoulder 15.00 

Georgetown Rogers Redding Broken finger. X-ray 22.00 

Georgetown Robert Wilson Ankle injury (special) 407.60 

Glasgow Gary Buckholz Dislocated thumb. X-ray 16.00 

Glasgow Ernest Cassady Elbow injury {speciall 18.25 

Glasgow Ross Cherry Dislocated thumb. X-ray 16.00 

Glasgow Robert Dickinson Loss of teeth 20.00 

Glasgow Bill Houchens Broken clavicle 23.00 

Glasgow Douglas Mansfield Laceration - suture 5.00 

Glasgow Douglas Mansfield Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Glasgow Bobby Moran Dental X-rays 4.00 

Glasgow Stanley Proffitt X-ray 10.00 

Glasgow Mac Rutledge Broken teeth 8.00 

Glasgow Tommy Sabens Leg injury (special) 124.50 

Glasgow Tommy Sabens Leg injury (special) 375.50 

Glasgow Jerry Wooten Loss of tooth 25.00 

Glendale Eddie Best X-ray 6.00 

Glendale Don Reynolds Laceration - suture 5.00 

Graham William Gates X-ray 5.00 

Graham Clyde Stovall X-ray 7.50 

Graham Clyde Stovall X-ray 10.00 

Grant County Robert Gouge Laceration - suture 5.00 

Grant County Jimmy Hale X-ray 12.10 

Grant County Giltner Meeks Laceration - suture 5.00 

Grant County Jimmy Mullins Laceration - suture 5.00 

Grant County Marvin Simpson Laceration - suture 5.00 

Grant County Benton Stith Laceration - suture 5.00 

Greenville John Forgy X-ray 5.00 

Guthrie Phil Coots X-ray 10.00 

Guthrie George Steele X-ray 24.00 

Haldeman George Hilterbrand Broken wrist. X-ray 32.00 

Hall Orville Ashe X-ray 6.00 

Hall Jerry Metcalf Knee injury (special) 405.00 

Hall Teddy B. Spurlock Leg injury (special) 87.50 

Hall Don Ward X-ray 6.00 

Hanson John Buchanan X-ray 10.00 

Hanson Mac Arthur Coble X-ray 6.00 

Hanson Harvey Oglesby, Jr Fractured tarsal. X-ray 37.00 

Harlan Bobbv Brown X-ray 6.00 

Harlan David Cawood X-ray 10.00 

Harlan Cecil Bard Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 28.00 

Harlan Jack Chitwood X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Bobby Cox X-ray 10.00 

Harlan Garrett Gross X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Gary Gross X-ray 10.00 

Harlan Weslev Marlin X-ray 16.00 

Harlan Howard Mize X-ray 10.00 

Harlan Lennie Moore X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Lennie Moore X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Dennis Parsons X-ray 10-00 

Harlan D-^nnis Parsons X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Willard Partin X-ray 6.00 

Harlan George Pollitte X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Earl Rodgers X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Earl Rodgers X-ray 10.00 

Harlan Douglas S. Seals X-ray 10-00 

Harlan Robert Scales X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Mack Short X-ray 6.00 

Harlan John Surgener X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Buddy Tweed X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Wayne Yarbough X-ray 6.00 

Harlan Buddy Tweed X-ray 10-00 

Harlan Bill Walls X-ray 6.00 

Harrodsburg Sam Brown X-ray 12-00 

Harrodsburg Morris Burkhead Laceration - suture 5.00 

Harrodsburg Eddie Young X-ray 10-00 

Hawesville W. T. Costello Leg injury (special) '■^^'i^ 

Hazard Joe Baker Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Hazard Joe Baker Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Hazard Robert Basey Loss of tooth i5'n? 

Hazard Robert Basey Loss of tooth 5„ 

Hazard Don Bryant Broken clavicle 36.00 

Hazard G. Wendell Combs Broken nose. X-ray 25.00 

Hazard Paul Cox Nose injury (special) 30.63 

Hazard Newton Green X-ray 6.00 

Hazard Walter Green X-ray 10-00 

Hazard Raleigh Johnson, Jr Broken nose 16-00 

Hazard James Nunn X-ray 6.00 

Hazard Bradley Smyly Loss of teeth 60.00 

Hazel Green dine Brown Broken tooth. X-ray 23.00 

Hazel Green Earl Grimes-- - Fractured clavicle 15.50 

Hazel Green Delbert Hammons X-ray T.60 

Hazel Green Jakie Hunley Fractured tibia 60.00 

Hazel Green Bobby Sparks Loss of tooth 29.00 

Hazel Green Bobby Sparks X-ray 10-00 

Henry Clay John Crawford Leg injury (special) 60.63 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Page Nineteen 



Athletic and Student Accident Insurance 

Especially for Members of 

Kentucky High School Athletic Association 

Underwritten by 
AMERICA'S NO. 1 ACCIDENT AND HEALTH COMPANY (R) 

CONTINENTAL CASUALTY COMPANY 

Through Its Representatives 

R. R. SULLIVAN AND ASSOCIATES 

6th Floor Hoffman Bldg. 

Louisville, Kentucky 



Gwynne Bldg'. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



First Federal Bldg. 
Elizabethtown, Ky. 



11 Davis Leg injury (special) 44.03 

Dan Beineke X-ray 16.00 

io!oo 

3.00 



Henry Clay 
Highlands- 
Highlands Larry Bentley Broken finger 

Highlands Larry Bentley Chipped tooth 

Highlands John Burt Broken tooth, X-ray. 

Highlands Grant Craig X-ray 

Highlands Bob Dziech Laceration 



Highla 

Highlands 

Highlands- 
Highlands 

Highlands 

Highlands 

Highlands 

Highlands—- 

Highlands 

Highlands 

Highlands- 
High Street. 



Mike 



22.00 
6.00 
6.00 

12.00 
7.50 



First X-ray 

Gish X-ray 

Fred Hall X-ray 10.00 

Kenneth Honchell X-ray 10.00 

Dave Hudephol X-ray 6.00 

Steve Kibler Laceration - suture 5..00 

Elliot McCrosley Dental injury (special) 50.00 

Don Miller Fractured femur 50.00 

Roger Moebus Dislocated wrist 10.00 

Aaron Mosley X-ray 7.50 

Bob Steinhauser Broken nose 21.50 

James Sears Nose injury (special) 149.65 

Billy Edwards Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 26.00 

Hiseville Billy Edwards X-ray 6.00 

Hiseville Oren Long X-ray 12.00 

Holy Cross Jack Reagan Fractured vertebra, X-ray 28.00 

Hopkinsville Clarke Linsey Dental injury (special) 50.00 

Hopkinsville Gary Tuggle Broken tooth. Loss of tooth 45.00 

Horse Branch Edwin Monroe X-ray 6.00 

Hughes Kirk Ronnie Dickerson Dental injury (special) 56.50 

Eddie Joe Horn X-ray 12.00 

Jacob Horn Laceration - suture. Broken teeth 10.00 

Jacob Horn Loss of teeth 40.00 

Marion Horn, Jr X-ray 10.00 

6.00 
6.00 
28.00 
45.00 
8.00 
50.00 
6.00 
7.00 
6.00 



Arthur Ballard X-ray 

Arthur Ballard X-ray 

._. James Brackett Fracturel ulna 

Abie Lewis Loss of teeth. X-ray- 

Glenn Sexton X-ray 

Paul Shearer Fractured tibia 

Paul Shearer X-ray 

James Stevens Chipped teeth. X-ray 

James Stevens X-ray 

Tyrone Witt Fractured fibula 60.00 

Tyrone Witt , Laceration - suture 6.00 

enkins Tommy Chaffins Loss of tooth 28.00 

Jenkins Ralph Clark Fractured metacarpal 26.00 

Jenkins Nickie Dann Elbow injury (special) 20.00 

Jenkins Nickie Dann Replaced fillings 8.00 

rTenkins Nickie Dann Dislocated finger, X-ray 13.50 



(Continued in September Issue of the ATHLETE) 



Page Twenty 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1959 



Attention Principals and Coaches! 

CHECK BEFORE BUYING ACCIDENT 
COVERAGE for FOOTBALL PLAYERS 



Insure through the Kentucky Central Life and 
Accident Insurance Company, Kentucky's 
oldest life insurance company. 

Available in conjunction with one of the best 
Student Accident Plans on the market. 



Local agents throughout the state (probably 
one in your community). 

Approved by the insurance committee of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association. 



K£;ep business 



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KENTUCKY 



Kentucky Central Life and Accident Insurance Company 

*7ne /^ut^aeH Qo4nfUift4^ general agent 



W. E. KINGSLEY 
603 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



LEXINGTON, KY. 



CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING— 

(Continued from Page Four) 
missioner said that he and Mr. Mansfield had studied 
the Alabama plan for determining championsihips, 
and he recommended that the point system of the 
Alabama plan be used in Kentucky to break a tie 
if one should occur in the Dickinson ratings. W. H. 
Crowdus moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, that the 
recommendation of the Commissioner concerning 
the adoption of the Alabama plan for the breaking 
of a Dickinson System tie be accepted. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that the Insurance 
Committee had presented three commercial insur- 
ance plans, which might be recommended to the 
K.H.S.A.A. member schools, at the April meeting 
of the Board. He stated that the Committee wished 
to present the plans of three additional commercial 
companies, which might be recommended to member 
schools of the Association. These plans were made 
available by the following: Kentucky Central Life 
and Accident Insurance Company, presented by the 
Kingden Company of Lexington; the John T. Muncey 
Company of Lexington; and Mutual of Omaha, 
Nebraska. K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Jack 
Dawson, that the three insurance plans presented 
by the Commissioner and the insurance committee 
be recommended to Association member schools by 
the Board of Control. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

W. H. Ci-owdus moved, seconded by Louis Litch- 
field, that the trophy committee be authorized to 
select new district and regional basketball trophies 
for 1960, and to advertise for and accept bids for 
these trophies. The motion was carried unanimously. 



The Commissioner presented a re-districting 
plan which he, upon authorization of President Wil- 
liamson, had presented to the principals of the 16th 
region. He stated that the majority of the school 
men polled favored the proposed plan, but that sev- 
ei'al thought that the changes suggested in the dis- 
trict lines would be unsatisfactory. W. B. Jones 
moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that the pro- 
posed re-districting plan for region 16 not be put 
into effect for 1959-60 but that the schools be noti- 
fied that, unless a plan is submitted to the Board of 
Control which appears to be better than the one 
presented, this plan will probably be adopted for 
the school year 1960-61. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Robert P. 
Forsythe, that the next meeting of the Board of 
Control be held in Lexington on October 17, 1959. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thorntan moved, seconded by W. B. 
Jones, that all bills of the Association for the period 
beginning April 17, 1959, and ending July 30, 1959, 
be allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its 
capacity as the Board of Directors of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Protection Fund. Secretary-Treasurer Sanford pre- 
sented the list of claims which had been paid by 
the Protection Fund since April 17, 1959, the total 
amount of these claims being $6,323.40. W. H. 
Crowdus moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that the 
claims presented by the Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Protection Fund be allowed. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



^^m^JoTi^ 




HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 
July 23, 1959 



Dear Friends: 

We want to take this opportunity to thank the many friends of the late 
William S. "Bill" Hunt for their messages and the expressions of sympathy 
on his death July 5, 1959. 

Be assured that his family and the staff of Hunt's Athletic Goods,, Inc., 
do appreciate these words more than you know. 

Bill was a friend to many but especially he counted among his friends the 
school officials and coaches of the State of Kentucky. To them he was 
always grateful and for them he was always working. 

It is our plan here at Hunt's to carry on in the very best possible way, 
and we think this very best possible way would be to offer the same type 
of service and i)ersonal attention which characterized our business from 
its beginning in 1919 to the present day. 

We want to assure you that we are always at your service and will be 
looking forward to an opportunity to serve you when your needs for 
athletic or sporting equipment shall arise. 

Again thank you for your many favors in the past, and let us hear from 
you in the future for that wonderful Hunt's service. 

Very truly yours, 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 



We ShiP'Thp DaV You BuV 





SuTcurn is keapy 

with complete football, basketball 
and athletic equipmet\t for the fall season 



^HME ORdERS HOW! 

Now we can give you immediate delivery. No Delays! No Waiting! 
Stock merchandise can be shipped on the very day your order is 
received. 

QUALITY BRANDS 

Our stocks this year are the same top 
quality for which Sutcliffe is now well 
known — nationally-distributed, nation- 
ally-advertised, preferred-quality brands. 

SUTCLIFFE SERVICE 

Write us about your needs — we'll give you one day service. For extra-quick 
vice or information — pick up your phone and ask for Al Seekamp 
W. Head in our Louisville Offic<^-JU 3-0251 For "on-the-groui 
vice, Sutcliffe's school representatives will contact you during the year 
usual— Harry Blackburn, 1540 Linwood Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, Vvill 
er the Big Sandy Valley ; Bill Shannon, 122 Yancey Drive, Ft. Mitchell, 

Ky., Dixie 1-6634, will cover Northern, Central and Eastern Kentucky. 

Charles (Chuck) Shuster, Horse Cave, Ky., State 6-6981, will travel Western 

and Southern Kentucky, and Al Le Comte, 924 Westview Drive, EM 6-3118, 

Louisville, Ky., will cover the Louisville area. 

\L BASKETBALLS 

No. RSS Rawlinors official 

College Ball $23.95 

No. RSS Rawlings official 

High School Ball $18.95 

No. 100 Spalding official 

College Ball $23.95 

No. XB 20 Voit Official 

Rubber Ball $16.75 




FOOTBALLS FOR NIGHT 


GAMES 


No. J5V-T 2 SPALDING— 




Tan with White Bands 


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No. R5-S RAWLINGS— 




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No. F1202 WILSON— 




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OJ'FKllAL TOO I BALLS — ^if you have not received your copy of 
our 1959 Fall Catalog by September 10, please drop us a card and we shall 
send you one promptly. You will be quick to appreciate the top-flight 
athletic items from which you may select your Fall equipment. 




^->^ 

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THE Sutcliffe CQ 

INCORPORATED 

225 so. FOURTH ST.. LOUISVILLE. KY. 




High School Af/iMe 



K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 




r 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Charlie Vettiner, School Director; Briscoe Inman, R. 12; James Jenkins, R. 5; Bennie 
Bridges, R. 10; Harry Stephenson. R. 11: Ernie Chattin, R. 16. Second Row: Bill Nau, R. 13; Joe Richardson, R. 4; 
Dave Longenecker, R. 7; Ralph Mussman. R. 9; Roy Settle, R. .). Third Row: Paul Wright, R. 14; Howard Gardner. 
R. 6; Kex Alexander, R. 1; Charlie Irwin, R. 2; Dick Looney, R. 15. 



Omcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
SEPTEMBER - 1353 



L 




Football Officials Meet at Lexington 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Fred Creasey, West Kentucky Athletic Conference, Sebree : Bill Gammon. Northeastern 
Kentucky Football Officials Association, Ashland; Dave Longenecker, Metropolitan Football Officials Association. Louis- 
ville: Tom Carroll. Falls Cities Football Officials Association, Louisville. Second row: Don Sullivan. Prestonsburg; 
Ralph Mussman, Northern Kentucky Conference Officials Association. Newport; Kean Jenkins, Mid-Kentucky Football 
Officials Association, Elizabethtown ; Clinic Director Edgar McNabb, Fort Mitchell. 



The Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation conducted a two-day meeting for 
football officials on August 14-15 in Lexing- 
ton. Officials from various sections of the 
state were in attendance. These men will be 
available for meetings and clinics through- 
out the forthcoming season, and will assist 
in the registration of new officials. 

Edgar McNabb, Assistant Principal and 
Athletic Director of the Beechwood High 
School, South Fort Mitchell, was director of 
the School. Mr. McNabb, currently Ken- 
tucky's voting delegate on the National 
Federation Football Committee, is also 
directing the 1959 football clinics for officials 
and coaches. 

The three sessions included the following: 
Selection of officials for the All Star game 

Report on the National Federation Rules 
Meetings 

Discussion of rules changes for 1959 



Roundtable discussion on uniform and con- 
sistent officiating 

Study and discussion of the use of signals 

Duties and positions of officials on various 
plays and situations 

Roundtable review, summarizing the prac- 
tical points as to game procedure and me- 
chanics that will aid in more consistent and 
uniform officiating in Kentucky 

The group made the following recommen- 
dations, which were approved by the Com- 
missioner, and asked that they be pub- 
licized : 

1. All schools should have a capable chain 
and box crew available before game 
time. The members of the crew should 
be present early enough for instructions 
from officials. 

2. Although the rules book does not men- 
tion that officials should warn teams at 
half-time, it is good procedure, and 
they are expected to do so. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XXII— No. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1959 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

Installment I 

1. Play: Rl returns K's punt to K's 15 yardline 
where he fumbles and K, in attempting- to recover: 

(a) inadvertently and unintentionally; or (b) inten- 
tionally kicks the fumble out-of-bounds on the 10 
yardline. 

Ruling-: In (a) it will be 1st and 10 for R at the 
inbounds spot on K's 10 yardline. In (b) it will be 
1st down for R on K's 7V2 yardline. 

2. Play: Team A furnishes a tan ball with white 
stripes. Team B desires to use a white ball with 
black stripes when it snaps or free kicks. 

Ruling: Unless both teams agree to B's use of 
the white ball the tan one must be used. 

3. Play: To what does "type" of ball in 1-3-1 refer? 
Does it imclude color? 

Ruling: No. "Type" in 1-3-1 refers principally 
to the kind of cover, i.e., composition, leather or 
rubber. "Type" may also refer to the texture of 
the cover — one "type" being considered more "tacky" 
than a second "type." An approved type is one which 
satisfies the rules specifications regarding con- 
struction, design, shape and weight when inflated 
as required. 1-3-1 makes no reference to color of 
the ball. 

4. Play: Substitute Al carries written instructions 
or a diagram out on the field to be used by his 
teammates. 

Ruling: Coachimig from the sidelines. 

5. Play: After a kick-off ready-for-play signal 
has been given, A4 steps off the field to get a 
new chin strap. Coach or other attendant hands it 
to him and then A4: (a) returns to the field 
within 25 seconds and before the kick is made; or 

(b) remains off the field for 25 seconds or more 
during which the kick is not made; or (c) remains 
off the field during the free-kick down. 

Ruling: In (a) there is no violation. In (b) A4 
has committed a foul by delaying the free-kick and 
in (c) there is no violation unless A4 enters the 
field of play during the live ball and he then touches 
the ball or touches or hinders an opponent (in 
which case he has participated illegally). 

6. Play: 3rd and 10 on: (a) B's 30; or (b) B's 10. 
Al throws legal forward pass. Bl interferes with 
end A2 on B's 1. The interference by Bl is also un- 
sportsmanlike. 

Ruling: Penalty is 15 yards for the interference 
and an additional 15 yards for the unsportsmanlike 
phase of the act. While both penalties are for one 
act, the two penalties are administered separately. 
In (a), first penalty takes ball to B's 15; the second 
penalty to B's IVz (half the remaining distance). 
In (b), the first penalty takes ball to B's 5; second 



penalty to B's 2%. 

Comment: Since the two penalties above are for 
a single act and since this is the only type of foul 
that permits an extension of the original penalty, it 
is not considered to be a multiple foul situation with 
the offended team being offered a choice. 

7. Play: While forward pass from Al is in flight, 
Bl intei-feres with end A2 by waving hands and 
arms in front of his eyes. Before pass ends, Bl 
or B2 also commits forward pass intereference 
which is unsportsmanlike. 

Ruling: Multiple foul. Team A will, of course, 
choose the penalty for the second foul since it in- 
cludes the additional 15-yard penalty. 

8. Play: The score is Team A-13 and Team B-12. 
Team B has scored both touchdowns by punt returns. 
As the 4th quarter is about to end. Team A is forced 
to punt. During the kick time expires. Team A com- 
mits fair catch interference by: (a) catching the 
kick in flight beyond the expanded neutral zone; 
or (b) preventing Bl from catching it by illegally 
interfering. 

Ruling: The game is over when the ball becomes 
dead. The fouls in both (a) and (b) have been by 
by the Offense, and therefore the 4th period cannot 
be extended by an untimed down. 

9. Play: Visiting team coach protests the intended 
use of a field clock. 

Ruling: A field clock may be used as the official 
time-piece without the agreement of coaches. 

10. Play: 8rd and 10 on A's 45. Al receives the 
snap on his 35 and throws a backward pass toward 
A2 who, while on his 30, bats it forward and out- 
of-bounds on: (a) A's 40; or (b) the 50 yardline. 

Ruling: Illegal batting in both (a) and (b). If 
the penalty is accepted in (a) or (b) it will be 3rd 
and 40 on A on his 15. 

11. Play: While clock is: (a) running; or (b) 
stopped, Al requests and receives from his bench, 
a chin strap. Without assistance from an attendant 
or without delay, Al with the help of a teammate 
or Official, quickly attaches it to his helmet. 

Ruling: There has been no infraction. If the clock 
has been stopped for the repair of equipment of Al 
and there has been no charged time-out during the 
dead ball period, it will be an Official's time-out 
in (b). 

12. Play: Substitute A12 brings a kicking tee 
into the game. Prior to the snap for the succeeding 
down, it is placed on the ground. During the down 
(a) it is, or (b) is not used for a place-kick. 

Ruling: There has been no foul in either (a) 
or (b). 

13. Play: While the clock is running, Al on the 
field: (a) requests; or (b) does not request from his 
bench that they toss him a kicking tee. The tee is 
given Al in both (a) and (b). 

(Continued on Page Six) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



SEPTEMBER, 1959 



VOL. XXII— NO. 2 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Le.\ing:ton, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-GO). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1967-61). Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdua 
(1958-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsvthe (1959-63), Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60). Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Commissioned s (Jffi 



ice 



Basketball Clinics 

The 1959-60 rules meetings for registered basket- 
ball officials and coaches will be conducted by 
Charlie Vettiner, veteran basketball clinic director 
who has served the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association for so many years. 

The dates and sites of the meetings are as follows: 

September 27, University High School, Lexington, 
1:30 P.M. (CDT) 

September 27, Newport High School, 8:00 P.M. 
(EST) 

September 28, Morehead State College, 1:30 P.M. 
(CST) 

September 28, Ashland Y.M.C.A., 8:00 P.M. (EST) 

September 29, Pikeville High School, 1:30 P.M. 
(EST) 

September 29, Hazard High School, 8:00 P.M. 
(CST) 

September 30, Bell High School, Pineville, 1:30 
P.M. (EST) 

30, Somerset High School, 7:00 P.M. 



Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 7:00 P.M. 
Daviess County High School, 1:30 
High School, 7:00 P.M. 



September 
(CST) 

October 4, 
(CST) 

October 5, 
P.M. (CST) 

October 5, Henderson 
(CST) 

October 6, Madisonville High School, 1:30 P.M. 
(CST) 

October 6, Mayfield High School, 7:00 P.M. (CST) 

October 7, Bowling Green High School, 1:30 P.M. 
(CST) 

October 7, Elizabethtown High School, 7:00 P.M. 
(CST) 

Use of Registered Officials 

Lists of registered football and basketball of- 
ficials appear in this issue of the ATHLETE. Prin- 
cipals and coaches should study the current lists to 
determine whether or not all officials with whom 
contracts have been signed have registered this fall. 
Supplementary lists of officials will appear in sub- 
sequent issues of the magazine. By-Law 22 provides 
that member schools shall use registered officials 
in all football and basketball games, and the failure 
to comply with this regulation makes the home 
school liable for suspension. If there is any question 
about registration, the official should be asked to 
present his card. 




Hayden C. Parker 
IN MEMORIAM 

Hayden C. Parker, principal of Olive Hill Schools 
since 1945, died in his sleep at his home near Olive 
Hill on August 13, 1959. Death was attributed to a 
heart attack. 

Mr. Parker was born on October 29, 1910. In 1929 
he married Miss Myrtle Jessee, and to this union 
two daughters were born. 

A graduate of Morehead State College, Mr. Park- 
er taught one year in Carter elementary schools 
and was principal of Carter Schools for three years 
prior to coming to Olive Hill. He had been active in 
the Carter County educational program for twenty- 
four years. 

Mr. Parker was intensely interested in athletics 
as an educational agency, and he attended state 
basketball tournaments for many years, being es- 
pecially gratified at the showing made by his teams 
during the years when they were regional winners. 
Following are excerpts taken from an article which 
appeared in the Carter County Herald: 

"He had through rigid discipline and attention 
to all details, made the local school one of the best 
in Eastern Kentucky. He was liked by school chil- 
dren of all ages, their parents, and the teaching 
staff under him. 

"No greater tribute could be paid any man than 
was paid Hayden Parker this morning by the tear- 
dimmed eyes and haltingly spoken words of regret 
as news of his passing flashed from person to per- 
son as they met on city streets or places of business. 

"Tihe entire community was shocked when word 
was flashed that Hayden Parker was dead. Only 
last evening he had visited and joked with his 
friends and had returned to his home in apparent 
good health." 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOiR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



Page Three 



School for Basketball Officials 

The eleventh annual School for Basketball Of- 
ficials was held on August 16-17 at the Phoenix 
Hotel, Lexington. The school was directed by State 
Clinic Director Charlie Vettiner. 

Pictured on the cover of the ATHLETE are the 
officials representing fifteen of the sixteen basket- 
ball regions. Elmo Head, who attended the School as 
a representative of Region 8, was not present when 
the picture was made. The services of these men 
will be available at K.H.S.A.A. member schools 
throughout the forthcoming season. They will con- 
duct additional clinics for officials, coaches, and 
players, and will assist beginning officials in regis- 
tration. It is urged that the services of the regional 
representatives be used by Association members. 

Attention, Sponsors and Cheerleaders! 

The Kentucky Association of Pep Organization 
Sponsors (KAPOS) and the Department of Extend- 
ed Programs at the University of Kentucky will 
sponsor a clinic on Saturday, September 19, for 
cheerleaders and their sponsors. Those interested 
should plan now to attend the clinic on the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky campus, and to take advantage of 
this opportunity to leann yells, skits, stunts, and 
other phases of cheerleading. Mr. Lawrence Herki- 
mer, Executive Secretary of the National Cheer- 
leaders Association, is returning by popular de- 
mand to lead the clinic. He is considered a national 
authority in this line of work. 

All spo«isors are invited to be the guest of the 
U. K. Athletic Association for lunch. The attend- 
ance at the luncheon meeting was disappointing 
last year. It is possible that it was not made clear 
that those attending were to be guests of the Uni- 
versity. Mr. Herkimer will be present at the lun^ 
cheon this year (12:00-1:30), and he will be avail- 
able to answer questions and help solve problems. 
Plans are being made to have a style show dis- 
playing the latest fashions in cheerleading supplies. 
It is necessary that advance reservations be made 
for the luncheon, and it is requested that a card 
be mailed to Cheerleader Clinic, Extended Programs, 
University of Kentucky, stating the number of 
cheerleaders being brought to the clinic and wheth- 
er or mot the sponsor will attend the luncheon. 
Each principal of a K.H.S.A.A. member school 
has received a letter, giving the details of the clinic. 

The Date September 19 

The Time 8:30-4:00 

Registration Fee $2.00 per person 

Alumni Gym Avenue of Champions 



Football Examination 

Part II of the National Federation Football Ex- 
aminatioin for Officials will be given in Kentucky 
on Monday, October 5. An official who has been 
registered for at least one year prior to the current 
season is eligible to take the examination and work 
for a higher rating. Officials who hold the "ap- 
proved" rating in football are required to make a 
minimum percentage grade of 80 in order to main- 
tain this rating from year to year. Officials who 
hold the "certified" rating keep this rating by 
attending one or more clinics each year. Eligible 
officials who wish to take the test should write the 
state office. 



National Federation Annual Meeting 

The 40th annual meeting of the National Fed- 
eration of State High School Athletic Associations 
was held at the Castle in the Clouds, Lookout 
Mountain, Tennessee, on June 28-July 2, 1959. Forty- 
two State Associations, Washing-ton, D. C, and 
Hawaii, in addition to affiliate Associations of 
Ontario and Saskatchewan, Canada were represent- 
ed. Fifty-inine State Executive Officers or Assist- 
ant Executive Officers, forty-nine State Association 
Board of Control Officers and seventy-one addi- 
tional Board Members attended. Several National 
Associations, including the National Association of 
Intercollegiate Athletics, the Natiomal Junior Col- 
lege Athletic Association, the American Junior 
Bowling Congress and the American Association 
for Health, Physical Education and Recreation were 
also represented. The total individual attendance 
was 530. 

The K.H.S.A.A. was represented by Vice-President 
Louis Litchfield; Directors Robert P. Forsythe, K. G. 
Gillaspie, and Cecil A. Thornton; and Commissioner 
Iheo. A. Sanford. 

Speakers and others who had an active part in 
the program, included many of the State Executive 
Officers and Board of Control Officers or mem- 
bers. Among the many excellent presentations were 
those made by Dr. LAWRENCE DERTHICK, Unit- 
ed States Commissioner of Education, Washington, 
D. C; DON FAUROT, Athletic Director of the 
University of Missouri; MILTON RAYMER, Ameri- 
can Junior Bowling Congress; DR. ELLSWORTH 
TOMPKINS, National Association of Secondary- 
School Principals, Washington, D. C; H. V. PORT- 
ER, National Federation Secretary Emei-itus; DR. 
SAM VENABLE, Dean of School of Physical Edu- 
cation, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; JOS- 
EPH COOKSON, Administrative Secretary, Babe 
Ruth League, Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; 
CHARLES A. SEMLER, Past-President, National 
Federation, Benton Harbor, Michigan; and EDGAR 
ALLEN, Sports Department, Nashville Banner, 
Nashville, Tennessee. Innumei'able excellent, brief 
reports were made by others. 

General sessions were held Sunday and Monday 
evenings. Combined sessions met on Monday and 
Wednesday mornimgs. On Monday afternoon the 
Board of Control Members and Executive Officers 
met in separate sessions. Tuesday morning the Non- 
Athletic Group met as did those interested particu- 
larly in Athletic Committee and rules reports. Wed- 
nesday afternooiffl five workshop sessions, grouped 
on the basis of interests met simultaneously. Tues- 
day evening was devoted to a banquet honoring 
the Secretary Emeritus and his wife, MR. AND 
MRS. H. V. PORTER, and Wednesday evening the 
40th Annual Session of the National Council was 
conducted. 

The Emeritus Secretary and his wife, MR. AND 
MRS. H. V. PORTER were guests of honor Tues- 
day evening at a fine banquet. The overflow crowd 
attending the event expressed their sincere appre- 
ciation to Mr. Porter for his many years of out- 
standing service as leader of the National Federa- 
tion. An outstanding address as a tribute to Mr. 
Porter by Past National Federation President 
CHARLES SEMLER summarized the great number 
of contributions Mr. Porter had made to the inter- 

(Continued on Page Seven) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



The Flying Dutchman 

As the Dutchman writes this first cokimn 
of the new athletic year he is high in the 
air riding an Ozarks Airliner to Paducah. 
Big things are scheduled recreationally in 
the "Land of Cobb." 

Joe Mitchell, Paducah Sun Democrat Pro- 
motion Director, Sherley Dunn, Ray Green- 
man, the Community Chest and the Chamber 
of Commerce are leading Paducah's citizens 
in a drive to organize the best recreation 
program in the Commonwealth in that 
Pennyrile paradise. They have called the 
Dutchman is as a recreation consultant. 

The eyes of Kentucky are focused on re- 
creation ventures. Bill Nau, popular man- 
about-town in Barbourville and sports of- 
ficial par-excellence, has been handed a re- 
creation budget by the City of Barbourville 
and told to put a "City Recreation Show on 
The Road." Bill has the drive and knowledge 
to produce. 

So it is that the first Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor for this season goes to debonair Bill 
Nau for unselfish service to kids. Everything 
Bill has planned calls for self-sacrifice for 
youngsters to keep them wholesomely oc- 
cupied in their leisure hours. The award 
could no go to a nicer "guy". 

Kentucky's school boy sports program is 
fine and serves a lofty purpose during the 
school year, but it only provides sports ac- 
tivity for three fourths of the year. Ken- 
tucky's youngsters, both boys and girls, need 
a continuing recreation program the year- 
round. Such a program must involve other 
recreation besides athletics. Study this fact, 
"If everybody in the United States wanting 
only athletics for recreation were taken 
care of we would provide for the needs of 
only 22 ^c of our population." 

This is the reason the Dutchman agreed to 
serve as Chairman of President Eisenhower's 
White House Study Committee on Recreation 
in Kentucky. All of Kentucky's coaches, who 
have not yet returned your questionnaires 
on your county's recreation, should do so 
now. 

All coaches have been asked by the White 
House Study Committee on Recreation to 
survey locally to determine (1) What Ken- 
tucky Has Recreationally, (2) What Ken- 
tucky Needs Recreationally, (3) How Ken- 
tucky Can Satisfy Its Needs. Johnny Crow- 
dus of the Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association is helping 
with this study. 




The Dutchman 

Russ Williamson has done it again. The 
personable gentleman is now president of 
the Deposit Bank of Inez which has recently 
opened. Already the Dutchman, whose head- 
quarters are away off in Louisville, has a 
savings account there. 

While Russ is going into banking, basket- 
ball officials Ralph Mussman and George 
Conley are going in for politics. Ralph is a 
"Shoo-in" as the next mayor of Newport, 
while George, who hails from Ashland, will 
be found in the State Senate the next time 
it convenes. 

This year's School for Basketball Officials 
paid high tribute to the Commissioner and 
Assistant Commissioner for their interest in 
the improvement of sports officiating in 
Kentucky. Both Ted and Joe Billy were 
awarded engraved statuettes of basketball 
officials. 

Centre College's Briscoe Inman and Haz- 
ard's Paul Wright added a lot to this year's 
School For Basketball Officials, held in Lex- 
ington in August. Briscoe is the "Life of the 
Party" and Paul is an "Anchor Man." Two 
swell fellows! They sold themselves to the 
fellows from the other fourteen regions. 
Briscoe looks like a quarter-back and Paul re- 
sembles Charles Atlas, but both are educa- 
tors and referees. 

Bowling Green's Jimmie Jenkins is about 
to enter the bonds of matrimony. This popu- 
lar official has given much to sports. He 
deserves the happiness coming his way. Roy 
Settle of Owensboro again established him- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



Page Five 



self as golfing champion of the Basketball 
School, with Elizabethtown's Kean Jenkins 
being the runner-up. Kean was also an of- 
ficial in the all-star football game. Ernie 
Chattin was back at the School after whip- 
ping a heart attack suffered last winter. 
Ernie has to go down in the book as one of 
"Kentucky's Noblemen." 

Here's a summary of the two high points 
of this year's School For Basketball Officials 
(1) If you are a dribbler, don't charge that 
defensive man facing you ; (2) If you are a 
Coach, stay on the bench. 

See you at the clinics ! 



Injury Prevention Conference 

The First Athletic Injury Prevention Conference 
on a state-wide basis was held on the University of 
Kentucky campus, Lexington, Kentucky, on August 
12, 1959. This was the first day of the 1959 U. K. 
CoachiiBg- School. The conference was sponsored by 
the Kentucky State Medical Association, in coopera- 
tion with the Kentucky High School Athletic Assoc- 
iation, the Kentucky Advisory School Health Coun- 
cil, and the University of Kentucky Athletic As- 
sociation. Dr. Carroll L. Witten, Chairman of the 
K.S.M.A. Committee oin School Health, presided at 
the meeting, which began at 1:45 P. M., when Dr. 
Witten called the group to order and g'ave the pur- 
pose of the meeting. Commissioner Ted Sanford 
g'ave the official welcome, and this was followed 
by a symposium moderated by Dr.. Witten. The fol- 
lowing talks were made: The Prevention and Recog- 
nition of Head and Brain Injuries — Paul J. Ross, 
M.D., Louisville; The Prevention and Recognition of 
Musculo-Skeletal Injuries — Charles F. Wood, M.D., 
Louisville; The Prevention and Recognition of In- 
ternal Injuries — John M. Moorhatch, M.D., Louis- 
ville. 

T'here was a discussion period with audience par- 
ticipation at 3:00 P. M., with a short recess. This 
was followed by a symposium which U. K. Athletic 
Director Bernie Shively moderated. The following 
talks were made: Responsibility of the Coach — Joe 
Ohr, Principal and Coach, Irvine High School; Re- 
sponsibility of the Trainer — John "Rusty" Payne, 
Trainer, University of Kentucky; Responsibility of 
the Physician — Owen B. Murphy, Jr., M.D., Lexing- 
ton; Responsibility of the Athlete — Frank Ramsey, 
Boston Celtics, Madisomville. An interesting dis- 
cussion period with audience participation followed 
the symposum. 

The program was well received by the school 
administrators and coaches who attended the meet- 
ing. Dr. Witten stated that his organization hoped 
to make the conference an annual affair. 



Delegate Assembly 

Article IV, Section 2-b, of the K.H.S.A.A. Con- 
stitution provides that members to the Delegate 
Assembly at the annual meeting- shall be elected by 
the principals of each basketball district an ballots 
distributed by the Commissioner before October 1 
and returned on or before November 15. Delegates 
serve for a period of one year, beginning January 1 
immediately following their election. 



Responsibility of the Coach 

By Joe Ohr 

Editor's Note: Prin. Joe Ohr of the Irvine High 
School, Secretary-Treasurer of the Kentucky 
Coaches Association, was one of the speakers at 
the recent Athletic Injury Prevention Conference. 
This article gives the high points of Mr. Ohr's talk. 

Contact sports in the schools of America 
are the result of public opinion and the com- 
plete fulfillment of the process of "educa- 
tion", that of teaching students to do better 
the things they are going to do anyway. As 
a teacher, coach or school administrator try- 
ing to justify a place for the athletic pro- 
gram, we can proudly point to the ''learn- 
ing situations" that the average program 
presents to each participant. 

Well organized high school athletic pro- 
grams help to teach young people moral and 
spiritual values, provide wholesome recrea- 
tion, build vigor, and improve skills, strength, 
agility and endurance. Athletics also pro- 
vide an excellent means of teaching the 
values of competition and cooperation. How- 
ever, in reaching these values a coach must 
never allow the fun to be taken out of ath- 
letics nor cause the neglect of the basic safe- 
guards of health. 

The coach of today has three direct re- 
sponsibilities: (1) to the participant, (2) to 
the parents, (3) to himself. 

As the direct responsibility of the coach 
to the player, the coach would be derelict in 
his duties if he did not demand that the in- 
dividual athlete have a complete physical 
examination before reporting for practice. 
This examxination can be made by the team 
physician or the family doctor. 

It is the resnonsibilitv of the coach to see 
that the player has a minimum of two weeks 
practice. Here in Kentucky, three weeks of 
practice must be conducted before a football 
game can be played and an individual player 
must have minimum of ten practice sessions 
before he can become a participant. 

The coach in his resoonsibility to the play- 
er should be prepared to recognize and prop- 
erly refer injuries to the appropriate medical 
or dental personnel. The coach should be well 
versed in first aid, so as to make the player 
comfortable until the proper medical person 
can take over the case. Actually, every play- 
er should be taught first aid. The plavei- 
should be informed that the games in whicH 
he is to participate will take place with teams 
of comparable abilities and that the practice 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



and playing seasons will be of reasonable 
duration. 

A coach has under his direction the most 
highly priced possession of a family, their 
child, and I'egardless of age or size, that is 
what he is, and the parents have every rea- 
son to expect the coach to look after their 
participating offspring. The coach in ful- 
filling these expectations should acquaint 
the parents with the fact that the boy should 
have a complete physical examination and 
urge the parents to disclose any health con- 
dition which may influence the safety of the 
participant. He should provide the parents 
with first hand information concerning the 
safety features of the equipment that is to 
be issued the boy. The parent should be in- 
formed that a physician will be present at 
all games and that an ambulance will be on 
the site of the contest. In the case of an in- 
jury which requires the treatment by a 
physician or in case of hospitalization, it is 
the responsibility of the coach to see that 
the parents are notified immediately as to 
the nature of the injury and the seriousness 
of that injury. Don't allow parents to hear 
of their son's injury by some TELEPHONE 
MINAH BIRD who may cause undue alarm 
and excitement. 

The responsibility of the coach to himself 
has several prime implications. First, the 
coach always wants his squad to be at its 
physical peak, and by TJracticing the ultimate 
in protection of his players this can be as- 
sured. Every coach should see that his school 
has a written policy concerning responsibil- 
ity for injury incurred in athletics. The 
policy should be made known to every par- 
ticipant, his parents, and other responsible 
adults. The coach should see that every boy 
has protection in the form of insurance, even 
if the coach has the assurance and permis- 
sion of parents for their boy to play. Assur- 
ance is usually lost with an injury, so in- 
surance is a must. With the courts of today 
making many decisions which reverse pre- 
vious decisions, the day may not be too far 
away when a coach could be held responsible 
for an injury incurred by a player under his 
supervision. 

In summary, the coach is confronted by 
two classes of injuries, the avoidable and the 
unavoidable. The first can be prevented and 
the latter, with a prayer to God, it is hoped 
will not be of serious or fatal nature. 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

Ruling: In (a) there has been no foul. In (b) 
it is illegal coaching. 

14. Play: Tackle Al charges across neutral zone 
into Bl before the snap. Official's whistle is too 
late to prevent the snap. Runner A2 advances, 
fumbles, and B2 recovers. 

Ruling: Penalty is loss of 5 from previous spot. 
Bl may decline this penalty. Hovi^ever, B may not 
keep the ball because the whistle prevented it from 
becoming- alive and therefore, the snap was made 
with a dead ball. After the measurement, it is 
A's ball. 

15. Play: What is the implication of the last sen- 
tence in the ruling for play situation 230? 

Ruling: The sentence is not intended to infer B 
can make a false start. It does mean, however, that 
B can commit encroachment by touching the ball 
or an opponent after the ball is ready-for-play and 
before the snap. 7-1-1 will apply for encroachment 
which is not unsportsmanlike. If it were an un- 
sportsmanlike act, 9-3 would apply. 

16. Play: Clock is stopped because ball is out-of- 
bounds or because of an incomplete forward pass. 
During the dead-ball interval and without delay or 
order from the Official Al, who is apparently in- 
jured, is replaced by A12. 

Ruling.: No time-out is charged. Clock will start 
with the snap. 

17. Play: Team A has used its permissible four 
charged time-outs and Official stops clock while ball 
is dead because of apparently injured Al. Before 
Al has been removed. Captain of B requests time- 
out. 

Ruling: Time-out is charged to B. Clock starts 
with snap or free-kick. 

18. Play: With ball dead and clock running, it is 
discovered both Al and Bl are injured or apparently 
injured. Team A has used its four permissible 
charged time-outs and B has used two. Neither 
Captain requests time-out. 

Ruling: Official stops clock. Both Al and Bl 
must be replaced for at least the succeeding dawn. 
The time-out is charged to Team B. Clock starts 
with the snap. 

19. Play: After approximately 20 or 30 seconds 
of a time-out charged to A, they are ready to play. 
Is it necessary for B to play when A is ready or is 
B entitled to the full two minutes ? 

Ruling: When A desires, Official should declare 
ball ready-for-play after there has been a reason- 
able time for both teams to take their positions. 
If, in this situation, B should have a player talking 
with his coach at the sidelines, reasonable time 
should be allowed for B to get back to position but 
it is not intended B be allowed to continue his con- 
ference through the remainder of the two minutes. 

20. Play: Team A uses the words "ready-set-go" 
in cadence sequence for more than three periods, 
always snapping the ball on go. During the 4th 
quarter, with 4th and 3 on B's 7 yardline, the ca- 
dence and the number of words used for the snap 
signal are changed. Linemen of Team B charge on 
the previously used signal and contact linemen of 
A prior to the snap. 

Ruling: Linemen of B encroached. Changing of 
snap signal by Team A is not an infraction. 

21. Play: After catching kick beyond expanded 
neutral zone and with ball in his possession, Rl gives 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



Page Seven 



fair catch signal presumably to deter K from 
tackling him, and thereby enhancing the possibility 
of a long runback. 

Ruling: This is not illegal. Players of K are ex- 
pected to know the status of the ball when the sig- 
nal is given. Rl can get no protection from a fair 
catch signal after catching the kick. Therefore, his 
act of signalling- in this situation is not considered 
unsportsmanlike. 

22. Play: Kick-off by K strikes ground on R's 
45. While Kl and Rl are actually attempting to re- 
cover the ball: (a) Kl pushes or blocks Rl and K2 
recovers, or (b) Kl clips or uses his hands on back 
of Rl (other than warding off a blocker) and K2 
then recovers. 

Ruling: Legal in (a). Foul during loose ball in 
(b). In (b) the penalty is measured from K's 40 
and K would kick off again. 

23. Play: A backward pass or fumble by Al on his 
4 strikes the ground. A2 illegally bats or kicks ball 
into the end zone where: (a); or (b) recovers 
and is downed. 

Ruling: Safety in (a) and touchdovi^n in (b) if 
penalty is declined. 



the Committee on Track and Field Rules and 
Records. A second meeting of the Track and Field 
Rules and Records Committee was held on Tues- 
day. 

(Continued in October issue of the ATHLETE) 



NATIONAL FEDERATION ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page Three) 
scholastic athletic program during his tenure as 
Federation Executive Secretary. 

Places of honor were also provided for several 
former Executive Officers or persons closely af- 
filiated with the Natiomal Federation program and 
who worked closely with Mr. Porter for many years. 
These included MR. AND MRS. HAROLD EM- 
SWILER (Ohio); MR. AND MRS. V. F. GODDARD 
(Tenn.); MR. AND MRS. GROVER C. KOFFMAN 
(Louisiana), MR. AND MRS. STACY NELSON 
(Tennessee); MR. T. A. PIGOTT (Oregon); MR. 
AND MRS. A. A. SCHABINGER (Official Sports 
Film); MR. AND MRS. KENNETH SMITH (New 
York); MR. AND MRS. H. A. SWAFFIELD (Con- 
necticut); MR. AND MRS HOWARD VANDER- 
HOEP (New York); and MR. AND MRS. O. L. 
WEBB (Nebraska). Mr. and Mrs. Porter were re- 
cipients of several gifts presented to them in token 
of the high esteem in which State Associations, 
manufacturers' groups and many individuals held 
them. 

The Tuesday night session included a preview 
showing of the new film "Baseball for Millions," 
produced by the Official Sports Film Service under 
the supervision of Director W. M. RUNYON. S. E. 
ALKIRE (Illinois) and J. C. HARPER (Alabama) 
assisted. 

THE TENNESSEE SECONDARY SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION, as host, provided a fine 
schedule of entertainment activities. The Tennessee 
Association also prepared and disti'ibuted a con- 
vention bulletin prior to each day's activity. The 
bulletin kept the need for announcements to a 
minimum, and enabled any registrant to learn what 
the scheduled activities were for any particular day. 

On Sunday, June 28, groups interested in Athletic 
Accident Insurance, the Basketball Official's Manual 
and the Track and Field Rules and Records Com- 
mittee met in separate sessions. CHARLES E. 
FORSYTHE (Mich.) presided at the Athletic Ac- 
cident Insurance group meeting, R. S. HINSHAW 
(Indiana) served as Chairman of the Basketball 
Officials' Manual Committee meeting and W. W. 
RUSSELL (California) presided at the meeting of 



Registered Football Officials 

of the K. H. S. A. A.— 1959 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, if is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abele. George F., 240 Taylor Dr.. Lexington, 2-8122, 2-9965 

Almon, James H.. 187 1st t.. Lynch, VI 8-5942 

Anderson. E. W., Jr., 504 Highland, Mayfield, CH 7-1794, 

CH 7-15;i7 
Atkinson. Charles T., 26 E. 19th Street, Paris, 172. 38 
Attick, William E., 8504 Shirley Lane, Pleasure Ridge Park, 

WA 1-3421, Ft. Knox 47059 
Autore. Daniel, Wheelwright, 2362 

Baker, Charles Joe, 2547 Harrison, Paducah, 3-3043, 56311, 

Ext. 222 
Ballard. Robert A.. Route 3. Shelbyville, ME 3-1238 
Barbour, Morris, 440 Wilberforce Ct.. Louisville 
Barlow. Billy, 3034 Lynnwood. Paris. 1095-W 
Barlow, Bob, Highland Ave., Georgetown, 894 
Baskin, Sylvester, 214 West, Lynch, VI 8-5637 
Bartels, John T., 432 Third, Davton, JU 1-4250, HI 1-9088 
Bauer, Richard E., 721 Kent, New Anbany, Ind., WH 4-1102, 

ME 4-1581, Ext. 475 
Beck, C. Norman. 2588 Filson Ave., Louisville 17, ME 4-1737, 

JU 2-3511, Ext, 381-382 
Bell, Clarence A.. 1228 So. 41st St., Louisville 11, SP 8-7792, 

JU 4-1361, Ext. 7124 
Bennett. Howard "Pete". Route 4. Mayfield, CH 7-3309, 

CH 7-3510 
Hlackburn, Adrian, 413 Scott Court. Prestonsburg, 2401 
Blanton, Homer, 711 Bellefonte-Princess Rd., Ashland. East 

4-1730. East 4-3730 
Blankenbeckkler. Ralph B., 2915 Carr St., Ashland, East 5-2710, 

East 4-1111, Ext. 270 
Boeh. Bill. 38(14 McNicholas, Deer Park, Ohio, Sy 1-8880, 

PO 1-1876 
Bonner, John C. 5335 Buckner Avenue, Louisville,, EM 8-2222, 

EM 3-9902 
Eostick, Lord M., Jr., 419 W. 12th Street. Bowling Green, 

VI 3-3319. VI 3-6573 
Poyles, Jerry, 3200 Park St., Ashland, EA 4-6995, EA 4-1111 
Brandenburg. Donald E.. 714 Exeter Ave.. Middlesboro, 1139 
Brian. Ted. 144 Farley, Paducah, 5-7605 
Brichler. Joe A.. 5737 Kiefer Court. Cincinnati. Ohio. 
Brizendine. Vic. 2711 Lakeside Dr.. Louisville, GL 4-6843, 

JU 7-9111 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, SP 6-2506, 

SP 6-2506 
Brown, Bill, (G. W.K 1725 Quarry Hill Rd.. Louisville. GL 8-4857 
Brown, John W., 975 Waverly Dr.. Lexington. 2-3506. 2-3212 
Burke. Daniel F., 115 Maureen Ln., Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 1-9631, 

MA 1-7411 
Byrd. Harry G., 7331 North Timberlane Dr.. Madeira, Cin- 
cinnati 43, Ohio, LO 1-8745, LO 1-8745 

Cain, Paul D.. 1215 Corbett, Cincinnati, Ohio, EA 1-7246, 

AV 1-9740 
Caldwell, Charles M., 2790 Latulle Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Caiman. E. C. Jr., Box 218, Sturgis, 2100. 3545 
Camobell. .lohn J., Route 5, Fulton, 1773, 130 
Campbell. William C, 7602 Rosemary Lane. Louisville 14, 

WA 1-9052. EM 7-9561. Ext. 427 
Canter. John, 2826 Esther Blvd.. Louisville. GL 1-8218, JU 7-8862 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington. Paducah, 5-7943 
Carroll, Thomas J., 1725 Devondale Dr., Louisville, TW 5-8478, 

EM 3-3582 
Caruso, J. T.. 123 Oak. Norton. Va.. 154. 410 
Cathey. Gene S., 1415 Vine, Murray, PL 3-3245, PL 3-5367 
Cawood, Hobart G,, 401';. S. 23rd. Middlesboro, 729, 537 
Cecil, A. Morris, 14 Shaw Lane. Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-8427. 

CH 1-2582 
Chambers, Dan, Jr., Matewan, W. Va. 
Cisco. Robert D.. 516 Oakhurst, Hazard 
Clinard. Fred L.. 1012 Snow Ave., Madison, Tenn., TW 5-2437, 

AL 6-7235 
Coleman. L. J. "Duke" Jr., 2554 Southview, Lexington, 7-3672, 

3-0885 
Combs, Travis, 510 North Main. Somerset. 1239. 143 
Corea, Frank, Box 452, Williamson. W, Va. 
Corrao, Philip J., 29 Coyle Dr., New Albany, Ind.. WH 4-9990, 

BU 3-7505 



Page Eig-ht 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



Coudret, Raymond J.. Jr., 2243 E. Iowa, Evansville, Ind., 

GR 7-4259, HA 5-3339 
Cowan, Robert L., 645 So. Western Parkway. P. O. Bo.x 15, 

Sta. Louisville 11. SP 8-3360. SP 6-1436 
Grace, James E., Route 2, Box 373, St. Albans, W. Va., PA 7-4779 
Craft. Bill, 638 Longview Dr., Lexington, 7-4843, 5-0160 
Creekmore, Lester. 313 Center. Bellevue, JU 1-2524, JU 1-9968 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., Box 236, Big Stone Gap, Va., 1294, 104 
Crouch. Jack 463 Villa Dr., Evansville, Ind.. GR 6-4892 
Crum, Edward E., 3242 Greendale Dr., Louisville 16, SP 8-6067, 

MI 7-7621, Ext. 226 
Current, Ellis Ray, 1933 Bellefonte, Lexingotn, 7-1049, 5-4660 

Daum, Charles A.. 216 Christ Rd., Evansville, Ind., HA 4-0217. 

HA 2-8805 
Davis, Clyde E., 2531 E. Euclid, Ashland. 4-7804, 4-7145, 
Deaton, Daniel E., Matewan, W. Va., HA 6-4115, HA 
Demyan, Edward, 1464 St. James Court, Louisville, ME 



JU 



5-1751 
6-2111 
7-3945, 

6-4354, 

6-4020, 

4-8465 



DeMuth, Paul E., 2242 Thistledawn Rd., Louisville 16, EM 

JU 7-9136 
Denton, Charles M., 1427 Clay St., Henderson, VA 

VA 6-3195 
Detenber, Gene, 229 Tyne Rd., Louisville, JU 5-7058, JU 
Dial, Jack W.. 1230 26th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dierolf, William H., Jr., Hqs. 501st Sig. Bn 101st Abn Div., 

Ft. Campbell, 3210, 2989 
DiMuzio, Robert M., 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati. Ohio, 

KI 1-2220. WA 1-1180 
Dizney, H. A.. 206 4th, Corbin, 154, 1796 

Richard S. "Dick", 5111 Emerald, Louisville, WO 9-7239, 
Jeff Bu 3-6611, Ext. 340 

S., 432 E. 5th, Lexington, 2-5131, 4-0350 
. B., 324 E. 9th St., Belle. W. Va. 
Richard "Dick", 61 Edwards Ct., Ft. Thomas, HI 1-4235 
Jack, 291 Burke Rd.. Lexington, 4-4396, 4-1717 
. W., 8422 Staghorn. Louisville. TW 5-7321, JU 3-3871 



Dola 

Dotson, 

Dougia 

Drake 

Durkin, 

Duke, 

Edele 



Ben R.. 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville, GL 4-3518, 

GL 2-2611 
Elkins. R. Percy, Box 288, Jenkins, 979, 58 
Ellis, Irvin, 1924 Bona Vista Dr., Charleston 29, W. Va. 
Ellspermann, George A., 3924 Joan Avenue, Evansville. Ind., 

GR 6-5693, HA 4-7741, Ext. 507 
Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Grove, Lexington 
Engle, Orville. 128 Oak St., Pineville, 7-2916 
Ensslin. Thomas F.. 260 Somerset, Stanford, Forest 5-2482 
Ernst, Edward R., Box 68, Hebron, Murray 9-7181, East 1-6758 

Falls. William M., 122 Liberty St., Hopkinsville. 6-2436, 5-8278 

Farlev, Kenneth, 115 Main t.. Irvine, 606-M, 506-J 

Farmer, Russell C, 509 Martin. Harlan, 2368, 760 

Faust, Jack, 2427 Concord Dr., Louisville, ME 7-2043 

Fitch, F. A., 156 Wilson Ct., Huntington, W. Va. 

Florence. Robert H., 2722 Trimble St., Paducab, 5-7389, 5-6311, 

Ext. 576 
Forbes, John W. "Jack", 208 Granvil Dr.. Louisville, GL 4-6025. 

SP 8-2731 
Fortney, Robert Lee, 2817 Breckenridge Lane, Louisville, GL 

8-1079. JU 2-3511. E.xt. 474 
Foster, Berryman E., 927 Waverly Dr., Lexington, 3-1827. 

2-0515 
Fraley, Bill, 407 Monterrey, Owensboro, MU 4-4663 
Freese. Oliver T.. 5518 Mapleridge Dr., Cincinnati 27, Ohio, 

LO 1-5398, ME 1-2295 
Fugate. E. Hugh, Price. McDowell, 2911. Prestonsburg 6261 
Funkhouser, Roy A., P. O. Box 2005, New Prov. Brn. Clarksville, 

Tennessee, Mi 7-2473, Ft. Campbell 2422 

Gammon, William H.. 908 Highland. Ashland, East 4-6519, 4-1111 
Gettler, John F.. 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 6-4801, 3-1646 
Gibbons, E. G.. 6928 Hurd Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio. BR 1-2580, 

MU 1-2200 
Giles, J. W.. 1043 So. 43rd. Louisville, SP 8-1976 
Gluzek, Henry J., P. O. Box 695. Lynch 

Golden. Billy Joe. 568 E. Main. Box 451, Lynch, VI 8-2512 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress St., Pineville, Edgewood 7-3331, 

Ed 7-2392 
Grady, Clarence O., 430 S. Main, Marion. YO 5-3533, YO 5-3131 
Graham, James E., 2601 Elm, Ashland. East 4-8169 
Greene. Omar Paul. 3903 Glenn Ave., Covington, JU 1-1700 
Greenslait, James W., 6O0 Brown St., Raceland 
Greenlee. O. C, "Doug". 105 Wilson Ct.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Gruneisen. Sam J.. 1101 Samuel St., Louisville, Me 4-9964, 

ME 5-6391 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 942 Wolf Run Ed., Lexington. 5-5332, 

2-7866 
Hagan, Joseph "Red", 3000 Sherbrooke Road, Louisville, 

GL 8-1325 
Hagerman. Bart, 115 Magnolia Ave., Bowling Green, VI 2-7865, 

VI 3-8313 
Hagy, Harold J.. 715 Grant St., Charleston. W. Va. 
Hale, Don C. Loraine Ct., Berea, Berea 1053 
Hall, Frank P., 2828 Clay, Paducab. 2-3073. 2-1627 
Hanes, Edward C, 1508 Ridgecrest. Bowling Green, 3-3432. 

Curry Elementary 
Harris. Gene. 201 Riverside Dr., Russell. 822 
Harrod. Robert. 129 Camden Ave., Versailles, TR 3-3797. 

TR 3-3691 



Hartig, Malcolm W., 2329 E. Illinois, Evansville, Ind., GR 

6-7242, HA 3-1051 

Hartley. William E., 5018 Winding Way, Evansville, Ind,, 

GR 7-0631. GR 7-0631 
Hatfield, Cecil E., Box 2676, Williamson, W. Va., BE 5-6448 
Hatfield, Gene E., Country Club Ct., Fulton, 1274, TU 6-5241, 

Union City, Tenn. 
Hawkins, Robert. Echo Lane, Madisonville. Taylor 1-6118, 

Tavlor 1-2990 
Heinold, F. Thomas, 6916 Terrylynn, Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

LI 2-1125, PA 1-6360 
Heinold, Jack, 6739 Wielert Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, LI 2-1431, 

MA 1-1901 
Heinze, Frank, 209 Maple Ave., Prestonsburg, 2436, McDowell 

2481 
Heinze, John G., 39 Highland Ave., Prestonsburg. 2195 
Hellard, George W., Jr., 572 Longview, Lexington, 7-2543, 3-0484 
Hertzberger, Robert H.. 2736 Marion, Evansville, Ind., HA 4-1681. 

HA 5-6211 
Hewling, Richard, 211 Linden Ave., Newport, AX 12299, 

ME 10010 
Hodge, Don Robert, 90 S. Marsham St., Romney, W. Va., 

71 M Romney 
Hoferer, Louis R., 420 McClelland, Cincinnati 17, Ohio, CA 

1-3022 WA 1-9841 
Holbrook, William, 2421 Forest Ave., Ashland, 4-5850, 4-2144 
Hofstetter, Carl, Williamson. W. Va. 
Hofstetter. Joe. Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
Holeman, D. Fletcher, 328 Poplar St.. Dawson Springs, SW 

7-2302, SWSW 7-4241 
Holeman, D. Fletcher, 329 Poplar St., Dawson Springs, SW 7-2302 
Howerton. Jack, Jr., 3620 Lexington Rd., Louisville, CH 5-8456. 

TW 5-0781 
Huber, Carl, 125 No. 37th St., Louisville, SP 4-3387 
Huiet, Fred. "Whitey." 7327 Osceloa, Madeira 43, Ohio, Locust 

1-9239, Cherry 1-4768 

Janning, Robert L., 151 Pleasant Ridge, Ft. Mitchell, ED 

1-3538, KI 1-2142 
Jenkins. Kean, 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, RO 5-4887, 

RO 5-4606 
Johnson, Bernard, 322 Blueberry, Lexington, 7-2883, 22200, 

Ext. 2324 
Jones. J. Carl, 1003 Ky. St., Corbin, 1820, 1506 
Judd, William T.. 103 E. Columbia St.. Evansville. Ind., HA 

4-9545. HA 4-6481. Ext. 214 

Kathman, Bernie. 3060 Elmwood Dr., S. Ft. Mitchell. DI 1-7369, 

MA 1-7541 
Kemper, Russ. 5732, Lauderdale, Cincinnati, Ohio, WE 1-6222, 

MA 1-4380 
Kerr, Kenneth. 10806 Grafton Hall Rd.. Valley Station, 

WE 7-3008. JU 6-4000 
Kimble. Frank. Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
King. Allen. 424 N. Brady. Morganfield. 632-W. 2 or 3 
Knight, James A., Third St.. Paintsville, 1298. 483-W 
Kraesig, Charles, 3851 C Fincastle, Louisville, GL 8-4969, 

EM 6-0326 
Kvle. Leslie G.. Jr.. 26 Chalfonte PL, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-8601. 
KI 1-2622 

Lamb, Billy, Box 232, Junction City 

Lancaster, Morris B., 106 Pemmoken Park, Lexington 

Lawson, Carl F... Ivy Hill, Harlan, 1327. 136 

Lawson, Leland, 949 Deporres, Lexington, 4-1009, 2-3044 

Lee, Charles J,, 315 Scott Ave., Lexington, 2-3003 

Lenahan, Thomas P., 3107 Doreen Way, Louisville, GL 8-4490, 

JU 4-9083 
Lewis, Jesse, O. D., 258 Kentucky St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Liber, James. 39 Glen Este, Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 1-3686, 

RE 6-450 
Lohr, Joel D., 3124 Redbud Lane, Louisville, GL 8-3386, TW 

,5-3401, Ext. 226 
Longenecker, David M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville, TW 6-9071, 

TW 5-3401, Ext. 301-2 
Lowe. Eugene. 107 Ford. London. VO 4-5724. VO 4-2207 
Lowe, Stanford. Box 337, Russellville, PA 6-6647, CY 7-6521, 

Nashville. Tenn. 
Lucas, Gene T.. 412 Clayton. Georgeotwn, 1371, 19 

McClaskev, Booker. Boston. TE 3-4725. 4-4916, Ft. Knox 
McConachie, Bvnn E., 5608 Halstead, Louisville 19, WO 9-9676, 

EM 8-6524 
McCowan, Connell. Route 1. Box 251. Corbin. 2361 
McCollum. Robert G., 406 Holliday Rd., exington, 6-3513, 2-2220, 

Ext. 2238 
McDade. C. F. "Mickey". 918 Sixth Ave.. St. Albans. W. Va. 
McGIasson, Eugene M.. Route 1. Box 736. Anchorage. CH 5-8554 
McHenrv. Louis P., 408V, Main, Hopkinsville, TU 6-2601, 

TU 6-2813 
McMullan, Cecil E,. Route 2, Golden Pond, WA 4-5504 
Makepeace, Wm. H., Jr.. 922 Edward Rd.. Cincinnati 8. Ohio, 

East 1-4042 
Marsili, Lee A. 1045 Gar Branch. P. O. Box 35. Lynch, 

VI 8-5673 
Martin, Bill. 153 Clav, Erlanger. DI 1-8472, MA 1-0130 
Matarazzo, Sal. 320 N. Mulberry St., Elizabethtown, RO 5-5689, 

Ft. Knox 4-7117 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



Page Nine 



Mathis. Curtis W., 109 Third St.. Harlan, 702, 1206, 2620 

May. E. B.. Jr., Box 185. Prestonsburg. 2314. 7661 

Mayhevv. William M.. 5755 B. Allison Ave.. Ft. Knox, 4-7866, 

4-6533 
Mayhugh, Robert L., Cherrywood Rd., Elizabethtown. RO 5-9298, 

RO 5-6187 
Mayo. Henry L.. Jr., 581 College, Paintsville, 856, 29 or 35 
Meeks, Jack, 407 5th. Corbin, 415, 561 
Melmige, Jim, Matewan, W. Va. 
Mercke, Frank, 417 Lotis Way, Louisville, TW 6-8460, 

ME 4-9491 
Meyer, Bud, 5319 Lilibet Ct., Cincinnati 38. Ohio, BI 1-3459, 

PA 1-4334 
^Miller, William A., 1601 Shelby Ave., Evansville 14. Ind., 

GR 6-9542, HA 5-7276 
Millerhaus, Bill, 923 Harris, Cincinnati 5, Ohio. GR 1-7904, 

WA 1-9922 
Mitchell. Emmett. 284 Taylor Dr.. Lexington. 5-2480. 4-4254 
Mitchell. Vyron W.. 901 Walnut. Fulton, 1648. 30 
Moellering. Louis H., 6287 Lilbur Lane. Cincinnati. Ohio 
Mordica. William A.. 800 Edgewood Ave.. Ashland, East 4-7741 
Morrissey, Rockne. 6306 Fairhurst, Cincinnati, Ohio, JE 1-1430, 

ME 1-2567 
Moss, Howard A., Route 4 or Box 1042, Paducah, 3-1072, 2-4474 
Moss, James W.. 609 Henry Clay Blvd.. Lexington, 5-0772, 

5-0772 
Mouser, H. D.. Princeton Rd.. Madisonville. TA 1-4864, TA 

1-6333 
Mullins, B. E.. Box 470. Paintsville. 432. 545 
Muntan, P. J.. 125 Woodmore Ave., Louisville 14, EM 8-8236, 

ME 7-7621 
Mussman. Ralph. Jr., 502 Monroe, Sewport, JU 1-4562, CO 

1-3120 

Nau, Bill, Clark St., Barbourville, LI 6-4112, 4-63057 
Neal. Gene. Route 1, Davis Pike. Batavia, Ohio, SK 3-5908 
Noland, Douglas, Herndon Ave., Stanford. FO 6-2609 
Nord, Ed. 1734 So. 23rd St., Louisville, SP 4-1958, TW 5-3401. 
Ext. 202 

Oakley. William D., 4 Senate Ave.. Morganfield, 295 
Omer. Billy Wynn. Reed Ave., Madisonville, TA 1-2833 
O'Nan, Norman, Elmwood Dr.. Henderson. 7-3968. 7-3455 
O'Neal, Bud. 1757 Harvard Dr., Louisville, GL 8-7940, TW 

5-6765 
Osborne, Ted. Box 806. Lexington, 6-8390, 6-8390 
Overby, H. E.. 1913 11th Ave.. N.. Nashville. Tenn.. AL 6-1310, 

CY 2-2473. AM 9-3516 

Pace. John D., Kentucky Mill. Inst.. Lyndon, TW 6-1701 
Parsley, Clyde E., Route 2, Providence, MO 7-2524 
Parker, Billy E., P. O. Box 731, Pineville. Edgewood 7-3293 
Pate, Lloyd W., 1011 Joyce Ln., Nashville 6, Tenn., CO 2-2916, 

TW 5-5472 
Peeno, Harry R., 422 Oak St., Ludlow, JU 1-7335 
Perkins, Billy, oute 1. Georgetown. 1849 
Perry, Alfred L., 321 Meadow Lane, Elizabethtown, RO 5-7735, 

Ft. Knox 4-2149, 4-2140 
Perry, L. J.. 438 South St., Lynch, VI 8-6841 
Poore, William E., P. O. Box 448. Hazard. 6-2484. 6-4523 
Preece. Boyce C, Box 544, Kermit, W. Va. 
Raiser. J. T., 990 Fredericksburg. Ed., Lexington, 7-1043, 

4-0304 
Ray, Shirley G., 3035 San Juan Dr., Owensboro, MU 3-7653, 

MU 4-4251 
Reddington. James T., 3824 Glenside Place. Louisville 13, GL 

2-9689, SP 8-4421 
Redmon, Herbert S., 316 Riggs Ave.. Evansville, Ind., HA 4-8361, 

HA 5-7152 
Reece. Fred. 149 Elm St.. Versailles. Triangle 3-3633, Paris 145 
Reed, Gordon "Moe", 22 Riverside Parkway, Ft. Thomas, 

HI 1-4946, Kirby 1-4507, Liberty 2-4607 
Reinhart, Eugene A., 4813 Sweetser, Evansville, Ind., GR 7-3919 
Renfro, John E., Box 298, Williamsburg, 6-488, 2721 
Rentz, Thomas W., 335 Transylvania Pk., Lexington, 4-1091, 

3-2880 
Rhatigan, Alfred J.. 10663 Chelmsford, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

PR 1-3326, EL 1-6400, Ext. 7 
Riddle. Maurice G., 177 Rucker Ave., Georgetown, 1884, 2-2220, 

Ext. 2238 
Riggins. Jason. Box 259. Williamson, W. Va. 
Riggs, William T., 28 Congress, Morganfield, 590 
Rocke, James M.. 10 Lewis Circle. Erlanger, Dixie 1-9082, 

Axtel 1-2523 
Rogers. J. B.. 832 12th Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Rolph. Harold J., 915 S. 7th. Ironton. Ohio. JE 2-4036. JE 2-3231 
Russell. Charles B., Lynch. VI 8-2301 

Russell. Joe. Box 213. Russellville. PA 6-6983, PA 6-6983 
Sabato, Al. 7621 View Place Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, VA 1-3646, 

MA 1-4262 
Sacra, Gresham. 920 Darley Dr., Lexington, 2-6036, 2-2220, 

Ext. 3217 
St. Charles. T. A.. 1409 Grandveiw Ave., Nashville, Tenn., 

CY 2-9958. AL 5-5497 
Sallee. Alan L.. 1737 Deer Park Ave.. Louisville 
Sanders. Mel. 3910 Sunset Ave.. Paducah, 2-3660. 2-2092 
Sauter. Harold S.. 1227 Crown Ave.. Louisville, Glendale 1-5463, 

Emerson 8-3381, Ext. 231-268 
Saylor. Emanuel, Green St., Loyall. 1140 



Saylor, Deward, Box 407, Wallins Creek, MG 4-3694. 2743, 2620 
Schad, James, 10717 Chelmsford, Cincinnati, Ohio, PR 1-5495, 

EL 1-3040 
Scharfenberger, Irvin T.. 7267 Jethve Lane, Cincinnati 43, 

Ohio, LO 1-6378, LO 1-6378 
Schlioh, Paul, 3150 Talisman Rd., Louisville, GL 8-6765, TW 

6-0211 
Scott, Luther, 211 Spruce St.. Murray, PL 3-4649 
Scott, W. L.. 1816 McDonald Rd., Lexington, 2-3316. 2-3595 
Selvy, Curt, Gordon Hill, Corbin 2422 
Shaw, John H., 219 E. Lee, Mayfield. CH 7-1907 
Shaw. Stanley E.. 4460 W. 8th St., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, GR 

1-1100. MU 1-3610 
Showalter. John. Georgetown. 662. 1240 
Sinclair. George H.. 5120 Lammers Lane, Louisville, WO 9-7926, 

ME 7-7621, Ext. 346 

Sizemore. Dewey. 157 Cedar. Hazard. GE 6-2672. GE 6-2141 

Skinner. Earnest. 206 Pine Street. Murray. PL 3-2993 

Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmview Ave., Louisville 18, GL 8-1286, 

EM 6-8746 
Smith. Walter K.. 1709 Harvard Dr., Louisville, GL 2-9478, 

JU 7-9201 
Smithson, Richard, 1546 State St.. Bowling Green, VI 3-9700 
Snider, Louis Gene. 3121 Debera Way, Louisville, GL 8-5248, 

GL 4-7511, Ext. 2953 
Steele, Charles S.. 644 Main St., P. O. Box 696, Lynch 
Stephens. Robert S., Box 529. Montgomery. W. Va. 
Stephenson, B. H., 331 Taylor Dr.. Lexington. 2-7970 
Stephenson. Harry. 2210 Circle Dr., Lexington, 4-9620, 4-2431 
Stevens, William D., 418 Culpepper, Lexington, 6-2578, 2-2220, 

Ext. 3223 
Stewart, Herbert T., 323 Deaton St.. Hazard, 6-2438, 6-2438 
Stone, Robert E.. 9 College Cts.. Barbourville 
Stopp, Lt. Col. Joseph E., Hq. 101st Abn Div., Ft. Campbell, 

3672, 4522 
Strimer, Albert C. 2610 Broad St.. Parkersbure, W. Va. 
Strong. Arnett, 425 Cedar. Hazard. GE 6-3938. GE 6-2141 
Stump. Bennett. 1401 18th St.. Parkersburg. W. Va. 
Sullivan. Don C., Mavo Addition. Prestonsburg. 2197. 2371 
Taylor, Dennis H.. 1406 Hughes, Murray. PL 3-4825, PL 3-1732, 

PL 3-5512 

Taylor. James R.. 506i/. E. 3rd Street. Le.xington 

Thompson. Jack. 1310 Rammei's St.. Louisville, ME 4-3517, 

.lU 4-5311 
Thompson. Jack. 2347 Saratoga Dr.. Louisville 5, Glendale 

2-9255 
Thompson, Ralnh, 649 Ivy Hill Dr.. Cincinnati. Ohio. BL 1-3344 
Thurman, J. W.. Manchester. LY 8-3462. LY 8-3737 
Timmering. George E.. 1741 Boiling, Louisville, SP 6-0309, 

ME 7-6171 
Treas, Joe W., 609 Green St.. Fulton. 1026, 41 
Troutman, Dovle. 211 S. Main St.. Harlan, 1937. 522 
Trunzo. Nicholas P.. 1015 Elaine Dr.. Louisville. WO 9-7735, 

GL 4-7511, Ext. 155 

Vance. Wendell R.. 1307 Whirlaway. Lyndon. TW 5-6618. 

CH 5-4121 
VanKirk. Alvia S.. 107 S. Poilar. Corbin. 1546. 146 
VanMeter. David G.. 3148 Talisman Rd.. Louisville 5. GL 

4-4030 
Vennari, Paul. Box 13. Becklev. W. Va. 
Verner. Ray, 2032 St. Teresa Drive. Lexington, 6-4837, 5-4224, 

Sta. 210 

Waide. Harry D., 212 So. Broadway, Providence, MO 7-5563, 

MO 7-2055 
Walker, Paul R., 625 Meadowlawn Dr., Bowling Green, 

3-8893, 3-8326 
Wanchie. Nicholas. USPHS Hospital. Lexin.gton. 6-1233. 2-8328 
Weber. David. 3707 St. Germaine. Louisville 7. TW 6-4298 
Weber. Edward H.. 3707 St. Germaine. Louisville 7. TW 6-4298 
Weber, Walter, 1882 Langdon Farm Rd., Apt. No. 6, Cincinnati 

37, Ohio, EL 1-1980. VA 1-4280. Ext. 316 
Weisbrodt. Paul E., 350 Stratford. Lexington, 7-3924. 7-3457 
Welch, Tom, 3932 Vine Vista, Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 1-8094, 

GA 1-5700. Ext. 371 
Werkowitz. Jack, 4614 Miller, Blue Ash, incinnati, Ohio, 

SY 1,5382, SY 1-5382 
White, Harlie, Jr., 501 4th Blvd.. Tompkinsville 
White. James E.. Main St., Lynch, VI 8-5608 
Wigginton. Allen M-. Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, SP 

6-7881, SP 6-7881 
Willev, Harold L., 852 West 4th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Williams, Bert O., 658 Ohio St., Lexington, 4-0057, 2-2626 
Williams, Reid C, Route 1, Mt. Hermon 
Williams Roy E.. 304 Deenwood Dr.. Route 3. Elizabethtown, 

RO 5-4831, RO 5-9159 
Wilson, C. P.. 449 13th Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Wilson. John P.. 812 E. Main St., Louisville, JU 5-4591, 

TU 6-0211 
Winfrey, Shelby, 108 Holly St., Berea, 805. 850 
Wise. Jack. 363 S. Broadway. Lexington. 2-0731. 2-0410 
Wurtz. Emil. IS E. 4th St.. Cincinnati. Ohio. GR 1-0526. 

DU 1-1232 

Tree Lane. Erlanger, 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



Registered Basketball Officials 

of the K. H. S. A. A.-1959-1960 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abernathv, George R., 324 No. Elm Street. Henderson. VA 7-1322 

Acra. Russell L.. 12 Church St., Walton. WAL 1302 

Adkins, Raymond C. 622 Amanda FCE Dr.. Ashland, EA 4-7229 

Akins, Charlie, Route 2, Cecilia. TO 2-1911. RO 5-9053 

Akridge. Dean. Fredonia, 4351. 4432 

Alexander, Rex, 1320 Well's Blvd., Murray, PL 3-3579, PL 3-2310 

Allen, Jack R.. Route 3. Green Lane. Bardstown. FI 8-8294 

Allen, James W., 3444 Monel Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 

Allen, Nelson R.. Box 438. Morehead State College, Morehead, 

ST 9-7106 
Almon, James H., 187 1st Street, Lynch, VI 8-6942 , 
Alstadt. Clarence J.. 721 Brvan Rd., Evansville, Ind. HA 2-2111. 

HA 5-9651 
Alwes, Donald R., Route 2, Henderson, Valley Station, WE 

7-6348, WE 7-2300 
Arnold, Kenneth Lee, Route 2, Box 658, Fern Creek CE 9-5445, 

CE 9-3267 
Ashby, Carl C, Guthrie, HU 3-2124 
Austin. Ray, 221 N. 3rd St., Williamsburg, 5906, 3271 
Baird, Bill, Box 978, Harlan, 678, 53 

Baker, James E., Box 488, Montieello, FI 8-5341, FI 8-2331 
Baker. Morris D.. 507 N. Third. Kentland. Ind. 
Barker. Walter D., Route 5, Box 218, Portsmouth, Ohio. UL 

8-2770. EL 3-4840 
Barron. Patrick. 836 First. Henderson, VA 6-4279 
Barton, Walter W., Route 2. Box 12. Corbin. 1432 M. 9144 
Boskin. Sylvester. 214 West St., Lynch, VI 8-5637 
Batten. Wade H., 3409 Sheridan Rd.. Evansville, Ind., HA 3-5117, 

HA 3-3282 
Bell, Clarence T.. 1228 So. 41st Street, Louisville 11, SP 8-7792, 

JU 4-1361, Ext. 7124 
Bennett. Gene. Rt. 2. Wheelersburg. Ohio, Scioto 970L, OR 6-4191 
Bentley, James, Shelby Gap 

Bigelow, Ralph, Route 1, Tollesboro, LO 4-6691 (Bus. No.) 
Billings, B. E.. Main St.. Stanton. NO 4-4437 
Black. Amos. 325 Moreland, Harrodsburg. 1490, 711-J 
Blackburn, Tennyson R., Box 2167. Williamson. W. Va. 
Blackburn. Viley O., 114 Richardson Dr.. Somerset. 1113, 993 

or 162 
Bowling, Roy. Route 1, Box 6, London, VO 4-4784 
Boyd, Tommy, 648 So. 44th, Louisville. SP 4-1018 
Bradshaw. Bill, Shakertown Rd.. Burgin. 5266 
Branaman. Bill. Jr.. 203 Goodwin Ave.. Corbin. 891-W. 604 
Braughler, David L., Box 162, Dry Ridge, Taylor 3-1761 

Jefferson 1-6214 (Cincinnati) 
Breeden, Charles. Mt. Washington. KE 8-4539. KE 8-4235 
Brewer. Randall. 117 E. 5th. London. VO 4-5608. VO 4-2107 
Brichler. Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, KI 1-6049, 

PA 1-1984 
Bridges, Bennie E., North Middletown. 4391, 2291 
Brizendine, Vic. 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville, GL 4-6843, 

JU 7-9111 
Brown. E. C, Whipp Ave.. Liberty, SU 7-4421. SU 7-4101 
Brown, James W., 102 Bristol Dr., Richmond, 1558, 1775 
Brown. J. Carlton, 411 O'Hara Dr.. Danville, 1569-J. 68 
Brown. John W.. 975 Waverly Dr., Lexington, 2-3506. 2-3212 
Brown. Thomas. 3598 Kenoak Ln., Cincinnati, EL 1-6532, 

RE 1-7360 
Browning, William H., Route 2, Lebanon, 790-W 
Brugh, Walter, So. Mayo Trail, Paintsville, 1114, 97 
Brummett, Joseph W.. 619 O'Hara, Danville, 2921, 1900, Ext. 26 
Buell. Elijah. 100 Steele Ave., Dayton, Ohio, CL 2-2777 
Buis. Nathaniel. Liberty, SU 7-3471, SU 7-2852 
Bunn. Harold. Route 1. Huntington. W. Va. 
Burdette, Wally. 1614 Oleana Ave.. Louisville. EM 6-5659 
Butcher. DeVoil. Chapmanville. W. Va. 
Butcher. Granville. Williamsport. 399 (Bus. No.) 
Byrd. Harry G.. 7331 North Timberlane Dr.. Madeira, Cinlinnati 

43, Ohio. LO 1-8746, LO 1-8745 
Cain, Paul D.. 1215 Corbett. Cincinnati. Ohio. EA 1-7246. 

AV 1-9740 
Campbell. French, Box 386, Allen 

Campbell. Harold L.. Walton, Walton 2064, AT 3-2161 
Canady, Ray B.. Court Square. Barbourville. 6-3501. 6-3110 
Canter, John. 2826 Esther Blvd.. Louisville, GL 1-8218, JU 

7-8862 
Cantrell, Orville, Jr., C.P.O. Box 243. Berea 

Carnes. Richard. 110 Plenty, New Richmond. Ohio RI 2-6642 
Carrithers. Calvin, 1813 Millgate, Box 358, Rt. 4, Anchorage, 

CH 5-0061, CH 5-4131 
Cartee, Ralph. Jr.. Olive Hill, FA 6-4252, FA 6-2061 
Caruso, Dick, 1964 Compton Rd.. Mt. Healthy. Ohio. JA 1-3349. 

GA 1-3300 
Cassady, Richard, 50S Nutwood. Bowling Green, 3-3506, 3-9078 
Gates. Thomas H.. Beniamin Terrace, Providence, MO 7-5625 
Cathey, Gene S., 1416 Vine. Murray, PL 3-3245, PL 3-5367 
Center. Marion S., Campton 

Chafin, David L., Box 458, Wheelwright, 2741, 3361 
Chandler. James F., 134 Main, Paintsville, 374, 69 



Chambers. Bill, 6329 Aracoma Bd.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Chandler. Jim T., Glenn Ave., Shelbyville, ME 3-3662 
Coakley, Robert D., 214 Taylor Ave., Campbellsville, 327-M 
Coffey, Kenneth B., Jackson St.. Berea, 154-J. 880 
Coleman, L. J. "Duke", 2554 Southview Dr., Lexington, 7-3672, 

Collins, Bob, Elkton, CO 5-2844 

Collins, Pvt. Hubert. US 62471704. Hq 2d Msl Bn, 67th Arty, 

Ellsworth A.F.B., South Dakota 
Collins, Larry, 29 Sterrett, Covington, AX 1-8616, ME 1-0010 
Combs, Keith A., 1301 McArthur Dr., Evansville, Ind., GR 

7-2869, HA 5-2214 
Combs. Travis. 610 North Main, Somerset, 1239, 143 
Combs, William E., 1300 McArthur Dr., Evansville, Ind.. GR 

7-4277. HA 3-4435 
Conley. George D., 2436 Roosevelt Ave., Ashland, EA 4-6042 
Connor, James R., 933 Saratoga St., Newport, JU 1-6121, 

HI 1-7102 
Cooke. George W., Box 722, Morehead, ST 4-4181, Ext. 36 
Cooper, John, Foster, PL 6-4608 

Cooper, John Wellington, Box 332, Danville. 2090-J, 9102 
Coppage. Donald L., Route 1, Walton, FL 7-5572, FL 7-3071 
Coryell, Francis W.. 162 Francis. Louisville 14. EM 3-6892 
Coudret( Raymond J., Jr., 2243 E. Iowa. Evansville. Ind., GR 

7259. HA ,5-3339 
Covington. Richard G.. Route 3. Lafayette Rd., Hopkinsville, 

TU 6-5171, BR 1-2020 
Creamer, Billy. LaFayette. BR 1-2168 
Creech, Robert C, Edmonton, GE 2-3121 
Creekmore. Ken, Somerset. 884 (Bus. No.) 

Crosthwaite. John S., Jr.. Box 236, Big Stone Gap, Va., 1294, 104 
Crutcher, James W.. 3210 Cawein Way, Louisville, GL 8-6830, 

EM 6-6688 
Cummings, Dale, 303 Forrestdale. Fulton. 908. Dukedom Exc. 
Cummins, Albert B., 3974 Mantell Ave., Cincinnati 36, Ohio. 

SY 1-1536. PO 1-4100, Ext. 2156 
Cunningham. Julian R.. Forest Ave.. Sharpsburg, CH 7-3111 
Dale. Pat. 581 5th St.. Paintsville. 1360. 866 
Dalton, Ray H.. 4707 Dohn Rd., Louisville 16. EM 6-8066 
Dame. L. J.. 604 Ridgewood. Owensboro. MU 4-6681 
Damico. Ernie. 1758 E. McMillan St.. Cincinnati. Ohio. WO 

1-8068. DU 1-2200. Ext. 370 
Danner, James, Felicity. Ohio, 6-3201 

Daugherty, Ehvood, P. O. Box 152. Beattyville. IN 4-9234 
Daum. Charles A.. 216 Christ Rd., Evansville. Ind.. HA 4-0217. 

HA 2-8805 
Davis, Harold T., Route 3. Beaver Dam 
Davis. Ralph E.. 1007 Front St.. Vanceburg, SW 6-4501, SW 

6-2521 
DeMoisey. Truett R., Main St.. Walton. HU .5-4203, HU 5-7200 
Dennedv. T. Robert, 352 Van Voast Ave., Bellevue, CO 1-9777, 

PL 1-4343 
Denton, Charles M., 1427 Clav St.. Henderson. VA 6-4020, 

VA 6-3195 
DeVarv. William B.. Box 4'>4. Middlesboro 
Dial. Charles R.. 3300 Monel Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Dial. Jack W., 1230 26th St.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Dierolf, Capt. William H.. Jr., Hos. 501st Sig. Bn. 101st Abn. 

Div. Ft. Campbell. 3210: 2989 
DiMuzio. Robert N.. 6422 Golfway Dr.. Cincinnati. Ohio, 

KI 1-2220. WA 1-1180 
Dixon, Konneth, 268 Turner Ave.. Irvine, 471-J 
Dorsey, James, 110 Gilsey Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio. GR 1-8050, 

GA 1-6700, Ext. 367 
Dotson. W. S.. 432 E. 6th. Lexington. 2-5131. 4-0350 
Dovle. Donald. 229 Risen. Campbellsville. 211-M. 231 
Drake. Richard R.. 61 Edwards Ct.. Ft. Thomas. HI 1-4235 
Duerson, Guy K.. Jr.. Short St.. Berea. 285. 184 
Duncan. James H.. Route 2. Rnssellville. 6-6767. 3-9245 (School) 
Durkin. Jack. 291 Burke Rd.. Lexinerton. 4-4396. 4-1717 
Dver. Joe P.. Route 2. Kirksey. HU 9-2187 

Edwards. Hubert. 600 Tutt St.. Columbia. FU 4-6332. FU 4-4531 
Edelen, Bon R.. 330 Wellingmoor, Louisville, GL 4-3518, 

GL 2-2611 
Elder. Robert J., Box 466 College Post Office. Morehead 
Eldridge. James R.. P. O. Box 337, Morehead State College 

Morehead 
Flkins. R. Percy. Box 288. Jenkins. 979. 58 
Flovitz. Cnrl. 1920 Spring Grove. Lexington 

F'rod. William T.. 322 Sumpter. Bowling Green. 2-5110. 3-4334 
Fnele. Orville. 128 Oak St . Plneville. 7-2916 
Ensslin. Charles W.. 716 N. Street. Barbourville 
Ernst, Edward R.. Box fiS. Hebron. Murray 9-7181. East 1-6758 
Evans Thomas P.. 607 Wichita. Lexington. 7-6505 
Fairchild. Gene P.. 3517 Clinton Rd.. Paducah. 3-4386. 2-4001 
Farley. Jimmy. Trailor 7-B. Vets Village P^ch-^ond 
Farmer, Russell C 609 Martin. Harlan. 2368. 760 
Feher. 4. J.. Fields St . 214. Cumberland. 66-J, Lvncii 5431 
Feix, Jimmie. 2110 Gabell Dr.. Bowling Green, VI 3-9635, 

VI 3-4334 
Fields, .Toe D.. Route 1. Gllbertsville. FO 2-4362 
Flagg. Robert A.. 32''' Ainslie Way. Louisville 5 
T^lvnn, Bobbv. 110 Halls Lane. Lexinfgton. 4-7924. 2-9474 
Flynn. Reynolds. 1440 Cypress St.. Paris. 277 
Fort. John W.. Pleasant View. Tennessee, SH 6-3465 
Foster, Berrvman E.. 927 Waverly Dr., Lexington, 3-1827, 

2-0515 
Fraley, Bill, 407 Monterrey, Owensboro. MU 4-4663 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



Page Eleven 



Francis, Wendell Y., 809 N. Race St., Glasgow, OL 1-5687, 

OL 1-2136 
Freese, Oliver T., 5618 Mapleridge Dr., Cincinnati 27, Ohio, 

LO 1-5398, ME 1-2295 
Fritz, Sherman, 122 Meadowlark Dr., Richmond, 2-9192, 1595 
Fuelling, Walter F., 3429 Parkrow Dr., Shivley, EM 6-4319, 

JU 2-8432 
Fugate, E. Hugh, Price, McDowell 2911, Prestonsburg 6261 
Fuller, John R., Jr., Route 4, Paducah, 3-3773, 3-5626 
Gardner, Howard E., McCuUum Ave., Route 3, Elizabethtown, 

RO 5-6273. Ft. Kno.x 4-7129 
Gary, Robert O.. Barlow 
Cast, Joseph H., 3812 Chatam Rd., Louisville, GL 8-7330, 

ME 7-9300 
Gentry, Charles Calvin, Route 1, Oak Grove, ID 9-3405, 

ID 9-3440, ID 9-3602 
Gerding, Jim, 1007 Patterson. Newport, AX 1-5152, HI 1-0159 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 6-4801, 3-1646 
Gibson, Fred W., 738 First, Henderson, Valley 6-9416 
Gilbert, Lawrence "Butch", 208 Southern Dr., Campbellsville, 

737-R, 386 
Giles, J. W., 1043 So. 43rd, Louisville, SP 8-1976 
Gill, Joe, 455 Marimon Ave., Harrodsburg, 861-R. 711-J 
Giordano. Al, 201 Highland. Princeton, 5680, 2635 
Glaysbrook, James Edward, 553 Adams Ave., Madisonville 
Goff, Richard, Steff 

Coins. Herman, Box 40, Gatliff Rt., Williamsburg 
Golden, Billy Joe, 568 E. Main, Box 451. Lynch. VI 8-2512 
Goley, Jim, 31 Wallace, Florence. AT 3-2802, CO 1-0520 
Gour, Sgt/lst Class Robert A., 139 Media Drive, Bowling 

Green, VI 3-9582. VI 3-4334, Ext. 27 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress St., Pineville, Edgewood 7-3331, 

Greene, Omar Paul. 3903 Glenn Ave., Covington, JU 1-1706 

Greenslait, James W.. 600 Brown St., Raceland 

Greer. Thomas, College Heights, Bowling Green 

Griffith, Daryel, Mouth Card 

Grigsby. Pete, Jr.. Box 692. Hazard, GE 6-4385 

Grimes, James W., Lewisburg. Skyline 5-8061, Skyline 5-6191 

Gustafson, Al "Gus", Jr.. 248 Francis Bldg., Louisville, GL 

4-6151. JU 4-2058, JU 4-7655 
Gutzwiller, Robert W., 1504 Norway Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 942 Wolf Run Rd., Lexington, 5-5332, 

2-7866 
Hagan, Joseph "Red", 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, GL 8-1325 
Hale, Don C, Loraine Ct., Berea, 1053 
Hall. Monroe. Jr., Belfry, EL 3-4485, BE 5-2323 
Hardin, Jack H.. 1106 "B" Street, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Harmon, Hayes R.. Box 174. Inez, 2771, 4671 
Harper, Jimmy, Beechmont, GR 6-2264. Drakesboro 
Harper, Robie. Jr., Beechmont, GR 6-2264, Drakesboro 
Harrell, Bill D.. Versailles, TR 3-4481 
Harris, Jerry Lee, Route 1, Rockhold, Corbin 1064-J-l 
Hartig, Malcolm W., 2329 Illinois, Evansville, Ind.. GR 6-7242, 

HA 3-1051 
Hatfield, Cecil E., Box 2676. Williamson, W. Va.. BE 5-5448 
Hatter. Jack, 1654 Amsterdam Rd.. Covington, ED 1-2444 
Hayden, Samuel J., Fancy Farm, MA 3-3641 
Henry, Tom, Lambda Chi Alpha House, Georgetown, 261, 261 
Hewling, Richard, 211 Linden Ave., Newport, AX 1-2299, ME 

1-0010 ; 

Hicks, Floyd E., 3308 Grace. Covington, HE 1-8380, RE 1-2121, 

Line 250 
Hightower. Kenneth, Box 88. Western Ky. State College, 

Bowling Green. VI 2-2523, VI 2-2523 
Hitt. Billy D.. Route 2. Mayslick. So 3-2661 
Hodge, Don Robert. 90 So. Marsham St., Romney, W. Va.. 

71 M Romney 
Hodge, Fred, 2011 Joyce Ave.. Evansville, Ind., GR 7-2993, 

HA 4-6411 
Hodges, Holbert, 616 N. Hill St., London. VO 4-5673, VI 3-2265 
Hoferer, Louis R.. 420 McClelland. Cincinnati 17, Ohio, 

CA 1-3022. WA 1-9841 
Holbrook, Arthur, Leatherwood 

Holeman, Bill R., Box 422, Manchester, LY 8-2289 
Hofstetter, Joe, Box 2173. Williamson, W. Va. 
Hook, Burnley B., Route 5, Paducah, 34610 
Hooks, Robert H., Wheelwright, 3361. 2122 

Howard, Oscar Douglas, 635 Mt. View Ave., Pineville, Edge- 
wood 7-2263 
Hubbs, Cletus L., Jr.. P. O. Box 64, Sedalia, FA 8-3453, 

FA 8-3241 
Hudson, Oscar. 708 Highland. Hazard, GE 6-3858 
Huiet, Fred, "Whitey" 7327 Osceola, Madeira 43, Ohio, Locust 

1-9239. Cherry 1-4768 
Hunley, Neil P.. West Liberty. SH 3-3131, SH 3-3705 
Hurley, Robert. Box 244. Williamson, W. Va. 

Hurst, Donald, 421 South 6th, Bardstown, FI 8-3218, FI 8-3345 
Hutchinson, Jack. Martin, 3427 
Hyland, Frank Dixon, P. O. Box 465. South Webster, Ohio, 

PR 8-2401, Waverly 5-10, Ext. 2165 
Idol. Billy Joe. 115 Oakwood Rd.. Middlesboro, 397 
- Inman, Briscoe. Centre College. Danville, 3075, 1900. Ext. 26 
Irwin, Charles R.. Route 4. Hopkinsville, TU 6-6820, TU 6-4820 
James, William V.. 911 N. Main. Beaver Dam, BR 4-4928, 

Owensboro, MU 3-3676 
Jenkins, Kean, 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, RO 6-4887, 

RO 5-4606 



Belle 



HI 1-1532, 



Jennings, Joe, 347 Bonnie Lesli< 

VA 1-1985 

Johnson. Joe E.. 106 So. 3rd, Central City. 947-R, 947-J 
Johnson, Walter, Box 397, Grayson, GR 4-4689, GR 4-5581 
Johnson, William Bernard, Route 7, Hopkinsville, AM 9-2208, 

TU 5-5366 
Jones, Carson G., 713 N. Main. Evansville. Ind., HA 2-3069, 

HA 4-7741, Ext. 360 
Jones, Charles Junior, 2834 Yorkshire, Louisville, GL 8-1293, 

Athei-ton H. S. 
Jones. Joseph. 2710 Shuck Lane. Louisville. WO 9-5898 
Jordan, Arthur C. Jr., 526 Dalton, Owensboro, MU 3-1024 
Jordan, Ken. 104 W. Orchard Rd., Ft. Mitchell, ED 1-2747, 

GA 1-3100 
Judd, William T.. 103 E. Columbia St.. Evansville, Ind., 

HA 4-9546, HA 4-6481, Ext. 214 
Junker, Edwin G.. 1045 W. Seymour, Cincinnati, Ohio, VA 

1-4117, VA 1-2322 
Kasperski, Harrv W.. 200 Plantation Dr.. Louisville. SP 5-6658, 

JU 4-1361, Ext. 404 
Kays, Herbie, Route 6, Shelbyville, ME 3-1801 
Keene, Marcum, Biggs 
King, James A.. 720 So. 43rd St.. Louisville 11, SP 8-3690, 

SP 6-2466 
Kinman, Joe T.. Roselawn Dr.. Williamstown. 4-6541. 4-6541 
Kremer. Joseph A.. 3727 Glenmeade Dr., Louisville. GL 4-3991, 

JU 7-0026, JU 7-7747 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Box 447, Fleming, 7726, 1218 Georgetown 

Lamb, Billy, Box 232, Junction City 

Lance, Walter, 2319 Maple St.. Owensboro, MU 3-3974, 

MU 3-1591 
Lankert, Norman B., 307 N. Sherwood, Clarksville, Ind., 

Butler 2-3368 
Lashbrook, Gene, 607 Warwick Dr., Owensboro, MU 3-0831, 

MU 3-2431 
Laubheimer, Donald T.. 5127 Johnsontown Rd.. Valley Station, 

WE 7-6840, JU 2-2541 
Lawrence, Alvin Lee. 211', Alta Vista. Walton, 1643 
Lawson, Leland, 949 D'eporres, Lexington, 4-1009. 2-3044 
Lay, William B.. 2903 Liberty Rd., Lexington. 6-1442, 2-2250 
Lazarus, Rhea Price, 1609 Nutwood, Bowling Green, VI 3-8398, 

VI 3-6191 
Leadingham, Jesse F., East Main, Greenup, GR 3-6641. Armco 

Ext. 321 
Lee, Robert L.. 217 Ridgeway Ave., Louisville 7, TW 5-6497, 

TW 5-2431 
LeVan, T. F.. P. O. Box 31. Benton, LA 7-3221, LA 7-4521 
Little, Ronn''e, Pomeroyton. SO 8-3345. SO 8-3345 
Long, Bill, 209 Idlewylde, Louisville 6, TW 5-8731, ME 5-5211 
Longenecker. David M.. 3910 Olympic. Louisville, TW 6-9071, 

TW 6-3401, Ext. 301-2 
Longo, Richard, Box 136, Transylvania College, Lexington 
Looney. Dick. Riverview Dr.. Pikeville. GE 7-6410 
Loudy, Kenneth. Slemp 

Lowe, Eugene, 107 Ford, London, VO 4-5724, VO 4-2207 
Lucas, Gene T.. 412 Clayton. Georgetown. 1371, 19 
Lyons, Charles S.. Sharpsburg. CH 7-2469 
Lytle, William Price, Box 1297, Columbus, Ga.. EA 3-3774, 

MU 9-5180 
McAnelly, David F.. 375 Sheridan Dr.. Lexington. 7-6610 
McCowan. Connell. Route 1. Box 261, Corbin, 2361 
McCoy, Hayse. P. O. Box 413. Inez 
McCov. Larry. 311 E. Main. Frankfort. CA 3-3819 
McFail. Gene G., Nancy, 8112-Y, 1000 

McGehee, Gordon K.. 117 E. 30th St.. Covington, CO 1-6880 
McGhee, Jack, Hyden, 15F21. Maple 31 
McGlone. Maurice Baxton. Bo 

Morehead „„„, 

McGuffey. Harold B.. Smiths Grove, LO 3-2022, LO 3-3031 
McHenry. Louis P., 4081'. Main. Hopkinsville. TU 6-2801, 

TU 6-2813 
McLeod, Robert N., Bourne Ave.. Somerset. 571. 545 
McMillin, Larry L., Route 6. Cynthiana. 852-M4 
McMulIan, Cecil E.. Route 2, Golden Pond. WA 4-5504 
McPeek, Stewart. Dorton 
McPike. Ray S.. 309 Theatre Bldg., 629 So. 4th St., Louisville 2, 

GL 1-3832. JU 6-2832 
Mack. Joel C. 112 Ft. Thomas St.. Lexington, 4-9377. 2-0640 
Macon, Alan L.. 1759 Wilart Dr.. Louisville 10, SP 6-7906, 

JU 4-1361, Line 473 
Mahan, Carle "Buddy", Manor Dr., Winchester, PI 4-4550, 

PI 4-3464 
Martin, Charlie. P. O. Box 53, Sharpsburg, 2611 
Mason, Gene A.. Route 5. Mayfield. FI 5-2430 
Massey, Douglas L., Box 1232. College Station. Berea, 301 

(Bus. No.) 
Matarazzo, Sal, 320 N. Mulberry St., Elizabethtown, RO 6-5689, 

Ft. Knox 4-7117 
Matthews, Lyle, 105 Albany Rd.. Monticello, FI 8-3066, FI 8-3286 
Mattingly, Bernard Charles. Box 183. Cloverport, SU 8-3308, 

SU 8-3741 
May, E. B., Jr.. Box 185. Prestonsburg. 2314, 7661 
Mayo, Henry L.. Jr.. 581 College St.. Paintsville. 856. 29 or 35 
Mazza. Al "Babe", Glenrov Dr., North Kenova, Ohio, Burlington, 

Ohio, 44625. DX 7-4343 
Meade, Foster "Sid", Box 63, South Portsmouth, FL 2-1391, 

FL 2-1311 
Melmige, Jim, Matewan, W. Va. 



Morehead State College, 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



Melton. Curtis Ray, Route 2. Madisonville. TA 1-6815. TA 1-3870 
Metcalfe. Earl L.. 3441 Lovelaceville Rd.. Paducah 2-1359 
Meyer, Bud. 5319 Lilibet Ct.. Cincinnati 38, Ohiol 'bL 1-3459 

PA 1-4334 
Miles. Joseph D., 124 Harrison, Jetfersonville, Ind.. BU 2-4794 
Miller, Bob. 197 Holiday Lane, Ft. Thomas, Hiland 1-5885. 

Avon 1-7722 
Miller. Claude O.. 704U Tenth Ave., Huntington, W Va 
Miller. Ferrel. Cadiz 
Miller, Rex J.. 2711 Greenway Rd., Ashland. EA 4-5023. EA 

4-6641 
Miller. Roy J., 544 Whitcomb. Clarksville, Ind.. BU 3-6335. 

EM 6-6286 
Miller, William A., 1601 Shelby Ave., Evansville 14 Ind 

GR 6-9542, HA 5-7276 
Millerhaus, Bill, 923 Harris, Cincinnati 5, Ohio, GR 1-7904, 

WA 1-9722 
Mitchell, Emmett, 284 Taylor Dr.. Lexington. 5-2480, 4-4254 
Mobley, Tony. YMCA. 239 E. High St., Lexington, 735 George- 
town. 2-2166 Lexington 
Moll, Francis B.. 820 Mulberry. Mt. Vernon. Ind., PO 3-2870, 

PO 3-4489 
Moore, Robert W.. Jr., 163 Forest Ave.. Erlanger. DI 1-6837 

HE 1-4040 
Moore. Roy. 101 Balsinger St., London, VO 4-5023, VO 4-5023 
Monahan, Ed.. 6821 Tarawa Dr.. Cincinnati 24, Ohio. JA 1-6582, 

MU 1-8300 
Morrissey. Rockne, 6306 Fairhurst, Cincinnati. Ohio. JE 1-1430, 

ME 1-2567 
Moser, Rudy Clay. Route 2. Sebree, ME 9-5317 
Mouser, H. D., Princeton Rd.. Madisonville TA 1-4864 TA 

1-6333 
Muncy, Charles P., 413 Daniels Addition, Ravenna, 493-W 
Mullins, B. E.. Box 470, Paintsville, 432. 545 
Murphy. Donald J.. 8875 Long Lane. Cincinnati 31. Ohio, 

WE 1-3189, WE 1-3189 
Murrell, Allen L., 1602 Glendale, Bowling Green, VI 2-1286, 

VI 3-4334 
Mussman, Ralph, Jr.. 502 Monroe, Newport, JU 1-4562 CO 

1-3120 
Myers, Charles N., 3654 Elderwood Way. Apt. 3. Louisville, 

EM 8-3771, JU 2-1361 
Nantz. Wilburn. Wooton 

Nau, Bill, Clark St.. Barbourville. LI 6-4112, LI 6-3057 
Neal, Gene, Route 1, Davis Pike. Batavia. Ohio. SK 3-5908 
Neal, Marion. 2215 8th Street. Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-3948, 

EL 3-4401 
Newman. Earl B.. 602 5th St.. Paintsville. 1287 
Newsome. Forest. Box 185. Wheelwright. 2784. 2142 
Newton. C. M.. 2041 Dellwood Dr.. Lexington. 7-2865, 4-2431 
Nie, Allen. 1031 Isabella. Newport, AX 1-6847, CO 1-1725 
Nixon, James W., 2713 Canton St.. Hopkinsville. TU 6-2641 
Noel. Robert A., 9 Euclid, Winchester, PI 4-1265 
Nord, Ed. 1734 So. 23rd. Louisville, SP 4-1958, TW 5-3401, 

Ext. 202 
Odle, Thurman, Canevville, 12 
Oldham, Charles M.. Thomas St.. Hartford 
Oldham. John H.. Route 1, Box 79A, Prospect, CA 8-1698, 

EM 8-2501 
Omer, Billy Wynn, Reed Ave., Madisonville, TA 1-2833 
Overly, William H.. P. O. Box 579. Somerset. 1294. 1294 
Owen. Arthur. 2627 Meadowlark Lane. Evansville, Ind., HA 

3-7833 
Park. J. M.. 924 Yarbro Lane. Paducah. 5-6567. 5-5292 
Parker. Billy E., P. O. Box 731. Pineville. Edgewood 7-2393 
Parker. Walker. 735 W. Main St.. Lexington. 3-2069. 3-3436 
Pate. Freddy. Route 1. Hickman. 2070 Riverview H. S. 
Pate. Roy E.. Campbellsville 
Patrick. Ralph. 1700 Edwards, Ashland. East 4-7537. Ashland 

Oil. Ext. 521 
Paulin, Al, 538 Franklin St.. Tell City. Ind.. KI 7-3323, KI 

7-3323 
Payne, Gayle H., Route 2, Pleasureville. UP 8-5980 
Peden. Harlan C. 206 Garmon Ave.. Glasgow 
Peeno. Harry R.. 422 Oak St., Ludlow. JU 1-7335 
Penner. Merritt Donald. Jr.. Route 2, Box 528, Manchester, 

Lyric 8-4098 
Pergrem, Nard. 2616 Country Club Courts, Ashland, EA 4-7664, 

EA 4-1155, Ext. 390 
Perry. Fred. P. O. Box 93. Grayson, GR 4-5891, FA 6-4701 
Perry, James E.. Route 6, Paducah, 3-6740, 5-6886 
Petty, John F., Route 1, Gracey, AD 5-5063. AD 5-5063 
Phelps, Ralph "Rudy", Box 533, Russell, RU-G172, 253 
Pickens, Jim, 942 Nutwood, Bowling Green. VI 3-9749 
Pittard. Fred W.. 129 Mimosa Lane. Paducah. 3-6680. EX 

5-4121. Ext. 64 
Poe. Thomas E.. Route 6. Benton. LA 7-7663. LA 7-7663 
Polston. Billy D.. Burkesvlile. 53 
Preece, Boyce C. Box 644. Kermit. W. Va. 
Preston. Woodrow, Route 2. Box 37, Pikeville. GE 7-4644 
Price. James E.. Star Route. Liberty. JU 7-2581 
Racel. Arthur David. Watterson Trail, Jeffersontown AN 7-6791 
Rainey, Jimmy. 16 Phillips Ct., Winchester. PI 4-2948. PI 4-2818 
Randall, H. C. Box 277. Columbia, FU 4-4661. FU 4-4711 
Randolph, Don M.. 6310 Sheila Rd.. Louisville 19. WO 9-6359 
WO 9-5145 



Reagan. Johnny L., College Station, Murray, PL 3-1345 PL 

3-2310, Ext. 233 
Redman, Malvern G., P. O. Box 55, Mt. Vernon, Ind., SU 3-2561 

PO 3- 2637 
Reece, Larry H.. Canmer. La 8-2552 

Reed. Charles R.. 147 Walnut, Versailles, TR 3-3394 CA 7-2231 
Ext. 436. Frankfort 
Reed. Gordon, "Moe", 22 Riverside Parkway, Ft. Thomas, 

HI 1-4946, Kirby 1-4507, Liberty 2-4507 
Reed, Grant, Jr., Lily, VO 4-4403 
Reinhardt. Myron R.. 1443 N. Ft. Thomas Ave.. Ft. Thomas, 

HI 1-3730, MY 7-9731 
Renfro, John E., Box 298. Williamsburg, 6-488, 2-721 
Reschar, John V., 5518 Pico Lane, Louisville 19, WE 7-2300 

(Bus. No.) 
Rexroat. Jerry Lawrence. 224 W. Main, Lebanon Junction, 

TE 3-4851, TE 3-4683 
Reynolds, Howard M., 407 Holt Ave., Mt. Sterling, 1058, 9S6-J 
Rhatigan, Alfred J.. 10663 Chelmsford Rd.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

PR 1-3326, EL 1-6400, Ext. 7 
Richards. Jim S.. 334 E. 15th, Bowling Green, VI 2-1133 
Richardson, Charles E., Waco, 2401, 4021 
Richardson, Joe M.. Star Route. Clifty. 48 (Bus. No.) 
Rickman, Murrel, Box 365 College Station, Murray 
Riggins. Jason, Box 259, Williamson. W. Va. 
Roberts. Donald G.. 119 Mac Court. Harrodsburg, 1060. 229 
Robinson, Pearl. Manchester. LY 8-4311 (Bus. No.) 
Roeckers. Bernard. 804 Loda Dr., Batavia, Ohio, PL 2-1140 
Rogers, Howard, 8 Walker Ave.. Winchester, PI 4-1785, 2-2220, 

Ext. 3228 
Roller, Otis, 3712 Nanz Ave., Louisville 7, TW 5-6356, JU 

7-1221, Ext. 302 
Rolph, Harold J., 915 S. 7th, Ironton, Ohio. JE 2-4035, JE 

2-3231 
Rouse, Clyde L., 630 Erlanger Rd., Erlanger, DI 1-6943, DI 

1-7737 
Rubarts, Leiand G.. Dunnville. SU 7-2784 (Bus. No.) 
Russell. Eugene "Eudy". 1106 Gallia St.. Portsmouth. Ohio. 

EL 3-7653. EL-3-4370 
Russell, Joe, Box 213, Russellville, PA 6-6983, PA 6-6983 
Rust, Lowell T.. Pearl St.. Auburn 

Russell, Allen W., 1503 Sycamore, Murray. PL 3-2832 
Rutledge. Marvin. 846 Ivy. Frankfort. CA 7-4347. 22250, Ext. 

3146 
Sabato. Al. 7621 View Place Dr.. Cincinnati. Ohio. VA 1-3646, 

MA 1-4262 
St. Clair. Robert ., Jr., 435 No. 29th St.. Louisville, SP 4-2911, 

EM 6-0326, Ext. 12 
Sanders. Mel. 3910 Sunset Ave.. Paducah 2-3605. 2-2092 
Savior. Deward. Box 407 Wallins Creek. MA 4-3594, 2793, 2620 
Schad, James, 10717 Chelmsford, Cincinnati, Ohio, PR 1-5495, 

EL 1-3040 
Scheben, W. J., 824 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, DI 1-6054, DI 

1-6832 
Schlich, Paul, 3160 Talisman Rd.. Louisville, GL 8-6765, 

TW 6-0211 
Schnebelt, Carl R.. Hanover. Indiana. UN 6-3843, UN 6-4561 
Schultz, Paul F., 2202 Mabert Rd., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 4-2082, 

MA 1-0126, Cincinnati 
Scott, W. L.. 1816 McDonald Rd.. Lexington, 2-3316, 2-3595 
Selvy, Curt. Gordon Hill. Corbin. 2-422 
Settle, Rov G.. 1413 St. Mary's Ave.. Owensboro, MU 3-3136, 

MU 3-3574 
Sexton, W. L.. 324 4th Ave., Dayton, HE 1-5941, MA 1-4321, 

Line 40 
Shaw. Donald Lee. 315 College St.. Barbourville, LI 6-3375, 

Union College 
Shaw, Earl, 109 Hill Court. Lancaster. 534. Bryantsville 2208 
Shirley, Henry, Route 2. Box 485. Fairdale. EM 8-3250. SP 

8-2731. ME 6-1821 
Shope. Lowell Marling. 30 Webb St., South Webster, Ohio, 

PR S-2425, Waverly 5100, Ext. 2665 
Showalter. John. Georgetown 662. 1240 
Simons. Joe A., Route 2, Flemingsburg, VI 5-4681 
Simpson, Fred C. 719" i 13th St.. Ashland. East 4-0655 
Singleton. Vesper, Brodhead, 11 
Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmview Ave., Louisville 18, GL 8-1286, 

EM 6-8745 
Smithson, Richard A.. 1546 State St., Bowling Green, VI 3-9700 
Sosh, LaRue, Uniontown, 4, 1 
Sosh, Nelson, Uniontown, 123, 1 
Spiceland, S. E.. 305 So. 13th. Murray. PL 3-2811 
Stamper. Paul. Grassy Creek. SH 3-3617. SH 3-4575 
Stamper. Robert L.. Morehead. ST 4-4227. ST 4-4127 
Steeken. William R.. 1636 Highland, Covington, ED 1-3789, 

HE 1-3108 
Stephens, Robert S., Box 529, Montgomery, W. Va. 
Stewart. Herbert T.. 323 Deaton Street. Hazard, 6-2438, 6-2438 
Stikeleather, Clyde L.. 201 Goff Ave.. Leitchfield. 892-R. 104 
Stone. Robert E., 9 College Cts.. Barbourville 
Stopp, Lt. Col. .loseph E.. Hq 101 St Abn Div.. Ft. Campbell, 

3672, 4622 
Story, Ray, Route 3, Waynesburg 
Strange, William L.. McCullum Ave., Elizabethtown, RO 5-4003, 

RO 5-5286 
Strong. Arnett. 425 Cedar. Hazard, GE 6-3938, GE 6-2141 
Sturgill, Barkley J.. Prestonsburg. 6781, 2391 
Sullivan, Don C. Ma.vo Addition. Prestonsburg, 2197, 2371 
Tarlton, Thomas O., 200 Southland Blvd,, Louisville, EM 6-3233 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 



Page Thirteen! 



St., Ft. Knox, 4-6860, 



Taylor, Bob, 4209 Hewitt, Louisville 18, GL 8-4293, ME 4-1681 

Taylor, Carl Ray, P. O. Box 542, Corbin, 158, 1.358 

Taylor, Dennis H., 1406 Hughes, Murray, PL 3-4826, PL 3-1732, 

PL 3-5512 
Taylor, Hal, 9802 Orlandi Ct., Jeffersontown, AN 7-6764, GL 

8-5142 
Thomas, Harold E., 7481-B 10th Tk ] 

4-1255 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga Di-, 

2-9265 
Thompson, Jimmie, 1030 Dogwood Rd 
Thompson, Ralph, 649 Ivy Hill Dr., Ci 
Thompson, Tommy, 2304 Kentucky 

(Bus. No. J 

Asa I., 828 Hillwood, Frankfort, 3-8714, 



Louisville 



Glendale 



Tipto 
Todd, Lonn 



West Palm Beach, Fla. 
innati, Ohio, PL 1-3344 
Ave., Paducah, 3-7338 

-1641 
H., Route 2, Madisonville, TA 1-5028 
Troutman, Doyle, 211 S. Main St.. Harlan, 1937, 622 
Tuck, Ochell, 124 Lexington Rd., Glasgow, 3331, 3811 
Tucker, Neal R., Dunmor, SK 5-8656, BR 1-2020, Hopkinsville 
Turner, Thomas, 9836 Douglas Walk, Cincinnati 15, Ohio, 

PR 1-5065, PO 1-4100, Ext. 1574 
Twyman, Louis J., Route 1, Stamping Ground, Frankfort, 
CA 7-4895 

Van Meter, Kaye Don, Bee Spring, LY 7-3676, LY 7-3605 
VanSant, William E., 101 Holaday Lane, Lakeside Park, DI 

1-6087 
VanZant, Jim E., 2nd Street, Williamson, W. Va. 
Varner, Ray, 2032 St. Teresa Dr.. Lexington, 6-4837, 5-4224, 

Sta. 210 
Vaughn, Melvin, 1302 S. Main, Corbin, 862-J, 1600 
Vescovi, Raymond B., 3626 Laurel Ave., Evansville, Ind., 

HA 3-8144, WO 3-3124 
Vettiner, Charles J., Armory Bldg., Louisville 
Vinson, Ray T., McRoberts 
Waide, Harry D., 212 So. Braodway, Providence, MO 7-5663, 

MO 7-2056 
Walke, Glenn R., 902 1st, Paintsville, 91, 221 
Walker, Paul R., 626 Meadowlawn Dr., Bowling Green 3-8893, 

3-8326 
Wallen, Don, P. O. Box 184, Wheelwright, 2775 
Ward, Jackie D., 1909 Circle Ave., Owensboro, MU 3-4147, 

MU 3-8676 
Watkins, Paul D., 121 W. 23rd St., 

MU 3-3575 
Weaver, B. H., Robin Rd., Horse Ca 
Weaver, Ray, 1419 Sleepy Hollow Re 
Weber, John, 3204 Watson, Covingto 



)wensboro, MU 4-2862, 

, ST 6-6781, ST 6-6181 
Covington, AX 1-4888 
AX 1-8662 



1-3884, 



Weber, Walter 1882 Langdon Farm Rd., Apt. 6, Cincinnati 37, 

Ohio, EL 1-1980, VA 1-4280, Ext. 316 
Welsbrodt Paul E., 360 Stratford, Lexington. 7-3924, 7-3467 
Welch, John H., Box 275, Neon, 7746 

Welch, Ralph W., 3011 Wedgewood Way, Louisville 5, GL 8-1746 
Welch, Tom, 3932 Vine Vista, Cincinnati, Ohio AV 1-8094 

GA 1-6700, Ext. 371 , . i x ouaa. 

Wells, Milford, 344 Bays Ave.. Morehead, ST 4-5781 
Wesche James A., 427 Queensway, Lexington, 6-7263, 6-2780 
Westerfield, Glenn, 536 Stanley, Evansville, Ind., HA 3-9670 

HA 4-3331 
Westhoff, Robert A., 26 St. Jude's Circle, Florence, AT 3-2971, 

DI 1-5056 
Whalen, William Clinton, Route 1, Maysville 
White, David B., 209 Sharon Dr., Bowline Gr 

VI 3-4331 

White, James E., Main St., Lynch, VI 8-5608 
Wigginton, Allen M., Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville SP 

6-7881, SP 6-7881 ' 

Wilcox, Edgel M., 206 Jarboe St.. Campbellsville, 77W 
Willett, Arthur "Bud", 3808 Nantz. Louisville. TW 5-0715 

JU 4-9011 
Willey. Harold L.. 852 West 4th St., Huntington W Va 
Williams, Bobby, 144 Aspen Ave., Richmond, 2671, 683 
Williams, Benny, Route 3, Philpot, PA 9-4566 
Williams, Reid V., Route 1. Mt. Hermon 
Willis, Donald A., Prestonsburg, 3407 Martin (Bus 
Winchester, Roy L., Vaughn Mill Rd., Louisville 18 

CE 9-3267 

Winfrey, Shelby, 108 Holly St.. Berea, 805, 850 
Wirtz, Howard A., 6510 Hamilton Ave., Cincinnati 24 Ohio 

JA 2-1818, PL 1-1323 ' 

Wise, Jack, 363 N. Broadway, Lexington, 2-0731, 2-0410 
Wood, Harry Phillip, Route 6, Bowling Green, VI 2-0168 

VI 2-5624 ' * 

Wood, Kenneth C, 547 Robin Ave., Frankfort CA 3-0244 

CA 3-0244 
Woods, Fairce O., Box 247, Jackson, NO 6-6384 NO 6-2804 
Wright, Billy Joe, Salt Lick, OR 4-3927 
Wright, H. W., Jr., 714 Cedar Grove Court, Louisville SP 

4-6173, JU 7-1161 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 E. 4th St.. Cincinnati. Ohio, GR 1-0526 DU 

1-1232 
Yancey, William T., 3618 Waggoner Ave., Evansville Ind 

GR 7-4336, HA 4-6576 
Yeary, William H., 156 Lowry Lane, Lexinton, 7-1578, 6-4041 
Yelton, Gene B., Brooksville. RE 5-3691 
Youtsey, Norman, DKE House, Centre College, Danville, 9162 



. No.) 
CE 9-5202, 



Report of Insurance Claims 

(Continued From August Issue of Tlie Kentucliy High School Athlete) 

Jenkins Danny Franklin Fractured tibia 50.00 

Jenkins Robert Home Elbow injury (special) 37.50 

Jenkins James Mahan X-ray 750 

Jenkins Terry Potter X-ray 20.00 

Jenkins Johnny Shook Fractured metatarsal 11.00 

Jenkins Fred Wolf Fractured ulna 38.00 

Jessamine County Richard Blackford X-ray 6.00 

County Bobby Hammonds X-ray 10.00 

County Lennie House X-ray 10.00 

Jessamine County Carl McGee Fractured fibula 20.00 

Jessamine County Ronald Reid Fractured vertebra. X-ray 20.00 

Junction City Noble Young X-ray 6.00 

Kingdom Come Morris Lewis X-ray 6 00 

Kingdom Come Wilkie Mitchell X-ray I 8.00 

Kingdom Come Allan Thompson X-ray 6.00 

Kno.x Central Rex Allen Laceration - suture 6.00 

Knox Central Rex Allen X-ray 10.00 

Knox Central Bill Burch Broken teeth 60.00 

Knox Central Billy Fultz Knee injury (special) 16.26 

Knox Central Harold Gregory Leg injury (special) 131.00 

Knox Central Terry Hammons X-ray 5.00 

Knox Central John Johnson Leg injury (special) 232.60 

Knox Central Delphus Lay Laceration - suture 6.00 

Lafayette William Anderson X-ray 6.00 

Lafayette Glenn Bell Broken ribs. X-ray 40.00 

Lafayette Charles Cash X-ray 10.00 

Lafayette Don Dunn X-ray 6.00 

Lafayette David Hammonds X-ray 18.00 

Lafayette Frank Hisle Dental injury (special) 32.50 

Lafayette Howard Hoover X-ray 10.00 

Lafayette Gary Howe X-ray 6.00 

Lafayette Tommy Huddleston Dental injury (special) 81.60 

Lafayette Earl Hundley Back injury (special) 38.25 

Lafayette Kenny Jayne Finger injury (special) 26.25 

Lafayette John Jenkins Dental injury (special) 62.60 

Lafayette John Jenkins X-ray 12.00 

Lafayette Bob Karsner X-ray 5.00 

Lafayette Bill McManigal X-ray 12.00 

Lafayette Winston Moore X-ray 6.00 

Lafayette John Poppas X-ray 10.00 

Lafayette Danny L. Redmon X-ray 12.60 

Lafayette Gerald Richardson Knee injury (special) ]4.S.2fl 



Page Fourteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 

Lafayette Charles Stanley X-ray 7.60 

Lafayette Charles Stanley Broken teeth 40.00 

Lafayette Douglas Walton Broken femur 100.00 

Lafayette Charles Webb Nose injury (special) 31.78 

Lafayette Dave Whorton X-ray 6.00 

Lafayette Les Woods Knee injury (special) 17.50 

Lafayette Les Woods Head injury (special) 30.50 

Lancaster Bradley Cox X-ray 7.00 

Lancaster Charles Ellis Laceration - suture 5.00 

Lancaster Marshall Johnson Loss of tooth. X-ray 29.00 

Lancaster Marshall Johnson X-ray 10.00 

Lancaster David Murphy X-ray 6.00 

Lebanon Randal Co-\ Laceration - suture 5.00 

Lebanon Charles Leffew X-ray 6.00 

Lebanon Billy Moore Laceration - suture 5.00 

Lebanon Jackie Owen Loss of teeth 61.50 

Lebanon Jackie Owen Loss of teeth 60.00 

Lee County Jack Little X-ray 6.00 

Leitchfield Tommy Harrod Laceration - suture 5.00 

Leslie County BUly Ray Morgan X-ray 12.00 

Leslie County Ji.nimy Roberts X-ray 8.00 

Letcher Larry Back Loss of tooth. X-ray 45.00 

Letcher Coleman Blair Laceration - suture 5.00 

Lewisport Billy Bryant Head injury (special) 22.25 

Lewisport James Stinnett fractured fibula 42.60 

Liberty David Morgan Broken nose 17.00 

Liberty Jesse Powers X-ray 8.00 

Liberty Ray W. Price Ankle injury (special) 168.50 

Lily Roy Wagers Laceration - suture 5.00 

(Franklin) John A. Bell X-ray 12.00 

(Franklin) Walter Doss Broken maxilla 40.00 

(Middlesboro) George R. Glass, Jr Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Lincoln (Middlesboro) Leatron Smith X-ray 6.00 

(Middlesboro) Amos Thompson Broken nose, X-ray 30.00 

(Middlesboro) Richard Williams X-ray 6.00 

(Paducah) Jimmy Terry Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Lincoln (Stanford) Charles W. Givens Back injury (special) 75.00 

(Stanford) Charles W. Givens Back injurv (special) 116.90 

Lincoln Institute John Lee X-ray 12.00 

Lincoln Institute Oscar Patterson Dislocated wrist 20.00 

Lincoln Institute Henry Travis X-ray 10.00 

Lincoln Institute Laphonso Williams— i X-ray 16.00 

Livermore Harold Humphrey Fractured radius 40.00 

Livingston Central Dickie Berry Broken nose 20.00 

Livingston William Smith Dislocated finger, X-ray, suture 16.00 

Lloyd Dennis Ashcraft X-ray 5.00 

Lloyd Jim Roberts Dental injuiT (special) 62.50 

Lloyd Jim Roberts Leg injury (special) 200.88 

Lloyd Arnold Robinson X-ray 6.00 

Lloyd Gerald W. Rust X-ray 10.00 

Lloyd Douglas Runion X-ray 6.00 

Lloyd James Simpson Knee injury (special) 217.78 

London John Floyd Fractured patella 22.50 

London Tommy Gandolfo X-ray 20.00 

London Jim Handy Broken maxilla 40.00 

London Bob Hendrix Broken nose 16.00 

London Bob Hendrix Dislocated shoulder 24.00 

London Tanny Phelps Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

London Ervan White Shoulder injury (special) 129.15 

LK)ne Jack Carl Woods Loss of tooth 4.00 

Louisa John Chaff in Broken finger. X-ray 16.00 

Louisa Randall P. Cook Broken nose 20.00 

Louisa James Cyrus Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Louisa Paul Fannin X-ray 16.00 

Louisa Bill Hardin Fractured clavicle 36.00 

Louisa Allen Holbrook Broken nose 20.00 

Louisa- Bill Lemaster Loss of tooth 25.00 

Louisa Bill Lemaster Broken nose 20.00 

Louisa Joe Maynard Knee injury (special) 213.00 

Louisa Joe Maynard X-ray 10.00 

Louisa Mike Meade X-ray 10.00 

Louisa Larry Osborne Back injury (special) 33.00 

Louisa Larry Osborne Back injury (special) 73.88 

Louisa Butch Wellman Fractured fibula 60.00 

Louisa Mont Wheeler Knee injury (special) 211.75 

Loyall Bradley Asher X-ray 20.00 

Loyall Clark Bui-khart Dislocated thumb. X-ray 20.00 

Loyall Harold Howard Loss of tooth, X-ray 27.00 

Loyall Snowden Lewis X-ray 10.00 

Loyall Pat Mincey Dislocated knee 35.00 

Loyall Pat Mincey X-ray 10.00 

Loyall Kenneth Parsons X-ray 10.00 

Loyall Jack Price X-ray 20.00 

Loyall Curtis Roper Loss of teeth 50.00 

Loyall Walter Simpson -Laceration - suture 5.00 

Loyal) Danny Threadgill Dislocated finger. X-ray 20.00 

Loyall T. Doug Wilder Leg injury (special) 120.00 

Ludlow Steve Baker Knee injury (special) 216.00 

X-ray 10.00 

X-ray 10.00 

X-ray IB.OO 

Fractured tarsal 10.00 

Broken nose 12.00 



Ludlow Stev 

Ludlow John Baugh 

Ludlow Robert Betz 

Ludlow Pete Carpenter- 

Ludlow Stan Clasgens — 

Ludlow Tom Creamer X-ray 10.00 

Ludlow Tom Holloway X-ray 10.00 

Ludlow Dan Johnson X-ray 10.00 

Ludlow Dale Lindle X-ray , 12.00 

liudlow— Dale Lindle Broken thumb. X-ray 30.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETlE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 Page Fifteen 

x-ray lO.Ofl 

X-ray g.OO 

Ludlow Howard Shadoan X-ray 10.00 

Ludlow Howard Shadoan Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Ludlow Philip Watkins X-ray g_00 

Ludlow James Young Laceration - suture 5,Co 

Ludlow William Young Laceration - suture 5.00 

Lynn Camp Jerry Chadweli Knee injury (special) 19.50 

Lynn Camp R. B. Engle X-ray 13.00 

Lynn Camp Arliss Fuson Knee injury (special) 15.00 

Lynn Camp Frankie Greer Broken nose 20.00 

Lynn Camp Frankie Greer X-ray 10. 00 

Lynn Camp Paul Johnson Groin injury (special) 78.00 

Lynn Camp Johnny Rowlett Ankle injury (special) 75.00 

Lynnvale Ronnie Calvert X-ray 10.03 

Lynnvale Johnny Drake Laceration - suture 5.00 

McCreary County Raymond Frazier Back injury (special) 87.98 

McDowell Donald R. Tuttle Loss fo tooth 25.00 

McKell Louie Bentley Fractured wrist. X-ray 32.00 

McKell Austin Royster Dental injury (special) 57.00 

McKell Darrell Sammons X-ray 10.00 

Mackville Jackie Key X-ray 10.00 

Madison Central Herman Campbell X-ray 20.00 

Madison Central Franklin Curry Laceration - suture 5.C0 

Madison Central Raymond Ross Fractured tibia 50.00 

Madison-Model Johnny Bottoms X-ray 6.00 

Madison-Model Dick Denny Hip injury (special) 48.25 

Madison-Model Billy Humble Dislocated thumb 10.00 

Madison-Model Billy Lee Hand injury (special) 76.25 

Madison-Model Talbott Todd X-ray 6.00 

Madison-Model Jerry Woolum Laceration - suture 5.00 

Madisonville Ronnie Butler X-ray 17.50 

Madisonville Ronnie Butler Leg injury (special) 150.00 

Madisonville Mike Crowley Dental injury (specail) 30.00 

Madisonville Roy Day Shoulder injury (special) 51.25 

Madisonville Robert Dutton X-ray 15.00 

Madisonville Robert Dutton X-ray 6.00 

Madisonville Gene Howard. Jr X-ray S.OO 

Madisonville Bobby Kincheloe Knee injury (special) 18.25 

Madisonville Tommy Mayes Laceration - suture 5. CO 

Madisonville David Playl X-ray 6.00 

Madisonville Barry Poole X-ray 6.00 

Madisonville Dennis Poole Laceration - suture, X-ray 15.00 

Madisonville Ronnie Rauh Laceration - suture. X-ray 15.00 

Madisonville- Ronnie Rauh Laceration - suture 5.00 

Madisonville Ruby Rodgers X-ray 10.00 

Madisonville Buddy Rogers Broken inger, X-ray 20.00 

Madisonville Buddy Rucker X-ray 6.00 

Madisonville Jim Spence Ankle injury (special) 18.50 

Madisonville Jim Spence X-ray 10.00 

Male Jerry Shepherd Loss of tooth 20.00 

Male George Norwood Fractured fibula 50.00 

Maysville Robert Alexander Dental injury 7.50 

Maytown Bucky Ellis X-ray 4.00 

Middlesboro Jimmy Barnes Broken tooth 8.00 

Middlesboro Conley Bingham Dislocated finger 5.00 

Middlesboro Karl Brittian X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro John Conner Chipped teeth 6.00 

Middlesboro Bill Dean Dislocated finger, X-ray 16.50 

Middlesboro Pat Greer Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Middlesboro Jim Hurst Laceration - suture 5.00 

Middlesboro Jim Hurst Laceration - suture 5.00 

Middlesboro Jack Jones Broken finger, X-ray 16.00 

Middlesboro Jack Lewis X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro John Loy X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro Larry Lyons Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Middlesboro Colley Mayes Leg injury (special) 93.00 

Middlesboro Roy Robertson X-ray 7.50 

Middlesboro Roy Robertson X-ray 5.00 

Middlesboro Don Yoakum X-ray 12.00 

Midway Alex Hall III Loss of tooth. X-ray 29.00 

Midway Don Hall Wrist injury (special) 48.00 

Midway Don Hall Fractured radius 40.00 

Minerva Philip Davis Dental injury (special) 15.00 

Monticello Tommy Jones X-ray 10.00 

Monticello Gene Pendleton Dental injury (special) 45.00 

Morgan County Larry Elliott X-ray 12.00 

Morgan County Jimmie Stamper Loss of teeth 50.00 

Mt. Sterling John Bailey Nose injury (special) 186.05 

Mt. Sterling Hugh Black Nose injury (special) 39.75 

Mt. Sterling Hugh Black Dental injury (special) 39.00 

Mt. Sterling Larry Broton X-ray 6.00 

Mt. Sterling Oliver Calvert Laceration - suture 5.00 

Mt. Sterling Dickie Fuller X-ray 7.50 

Mt. Sterling Cliff HoUiday X-ray 6.00 

Mt. Sterling Cliff Holliday Laceration - suture 6.00 

Mt. Sterling Alvin Manuel X-ray 6.00 

Mt. Sterling Johnny Morrison X-ray 6.00 

Mt. Sterling Kenneth West Laceration - suture 6.00 

Mt. Sterling Billy Wilcox Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Mt. Vernon Buddy Cox Laceration-suture 5.00 

Mt. Vernon Preston Nunnelley X-ray 6.00 

Mt. Washington Barry Armstrong Dislocated shoulder 25.00 

Mt. Washington Charles Caddie Fractured radius 40.00 

Muhlenberg Central Larry Gary Head injury (special) 76.78 

Muhlenberg Central Ira Hearld X-ray B.OO 

Muhlenberg Central Richard Thompson X-ray 10.00 

Murray Harry Allison Dental injury (special) 46.00 

Murray Joe Bob Brewer X-ray 10.00 



Page Sixteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1959 

Murray Joe Bob Brewer X-ray 6.00 

Murray Joe Bob Brewer X-ray 7.60 

Murray Leslie Caroway X-ray 10.00 

Murray Kenny Farrell X-ray 5.00 

Murray Dick George Laceration-suture 5.00 

Murray Jerry Henry Dental injury (special) 66.50 

Murray Jerry Henry Dislocated elbow, X-ray 31.00 

Murray Robert Lee X-ray 5.00 

Murray Frank Rickman Dental injury (specialj 55.00 

Murray Jimmie Rose X-ray 20.00 

Murray Jimmie Rose X-ray 6.00 

Murray Steve Sanders Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Murray David Sykes Dental injury (special) 39.50 

Murray Robert Vaughn Broken metacarpal. X-ray 26.(30 

Napier Everett Campbell Loss of tooth 25.00 

Napier Harold Eversole Back injury (special) 50.50 

Napier Harry Francis Broken teeth 50.00 

Napier Kid Fugate X-ray 20.00 

Napier Sterling Howard Fractured tibia 50.00 

Napier John Layne Back injury (special) 17.80 

New Concord John D. Finney Laceration - suture 5.00 

New Concord Joseph Green Dental injury 5.00 

New Concord Dorsey Hendon X-ray 5.00 

New Concord Edison Rowland X-ray 6.00 

New Concord Eugene Rowland X-ray 6.00 

New Concord Charles Stubble£ield X-ray 10.00 

Newport Jim Bird Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Newport Dennis Brown X-ray 10.00 

Newport Dan Carmichael X-ray 10.00 

Newport Jim Franzen X-ray 10.00 

Newport Ray Gauldin Kidney injury (special) 276.53 

Newport Rodney Gross Laceration - suture. X-ray 25.00 

Newport Wayne Hetteberg Fractured fibula 50.00 

Newport Richey Huck X-ray 10.00 

Newport Bill Knapp Fractured tarsal (special) 36.00 

Newport William Knapp Broken nose 20.00 

Newport Bob Lee X-ray 7.00 

Newport Dick Lienhardt Dislocate'' finger 10.00 

Newport Jeff Miller Laceration-suture 5.00 

Newport Robert Morris X-ray 5.00 

Newport Cecil Neal Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Newport Ken Pigg Fractured fibula 60.00 

Newport Dan Points Broken tooth 20.00 

Newport Tom Ratliff Wrist injury (special) 25.00 

Newport Roy Riley Loss of teeth 36.00 

Newport Roy Riley Laceration - suture. X-ray 16.00 

Newport Leroy Schoo X-ray 6.00 

Newport John Schultz Loss of tooth 3.0D 

Newport Hal Smith X-ray 6.00 

Newport James Stautberg Loss of teeth 50.00 

Newport Leroy Turner X-ray 12.50 

Newport Leroy Turner X-ray 10.00 

Newport Richard Vories Shoulder injury (special) 77.50 

Newport John Williams X-ray 20.00 

Newport Catholic Daniel Andrews Knee injury, (special) 15.38 

Newport Catholic Dennis Bricking X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic Nick Dahinden X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic James Donelan Dislocated finger. X-ray 22.00 

Newport Catholic Ronald Fay X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic William Frey Laceration - suture 5.00 

Newport Catholic James Gastauer X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic Gerald Glaser X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic Martin Gutfreund X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic Richard Harvey Loss of tooth 25.00 

Newport Catholic Ronald Hunter X-ray 12.00 

Newport Catholic Gerald Lape X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic Gerald Lape X-ray 15.00 

Newport Catholic Dennis Rosenhagen X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic Randal Schomaker X-ray 6.00 

Newport Catholic Pat Schroder X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic Steve Smith X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic James Stautberg X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic James Vonderhaar Nose injury (special) 93.00 

Newport Catholic Carl Wiedemann X-ray 6.00 

Newport Catholic Carl Wiedemann X-ray 10.00 

Newport Catholic Carl Wiedemann Laceration - suture 5.00 

Nicholas County .Tack Guy Knee injury (special) 168.23 

Nicholas County Leo Lynam Ankle injury (special) 15.00 

North Marshall Leroy Mayers X-ray 6.00 

Oldham County Rowan Adams Jaw injury (special) 184.90 

Oldham County Ray Blankenship Dislocated shoulder 36.00 

Oldham County Garry Felton X-ray 5.00 

Oldham County Dan Hardesty Fractured tibia 50.00 

Oldham County John Hudson Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 37.00 

Oldham County Larry Stanley X-ray 10.00 

Old Kentucky Home Tommy Brewer Fractured radius 40.00 

Old Kentucky Home Joe Carter Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Oneida Dudley Hillard Laceration - suture 5.00 

Owen County Larry Duvall Laceration - suture 5.00 

Owen County Jim Bob Prather Knee injury (special) 16.00 

Owen County Stanley Wiggs X-ray 15.00 

Paducah Tilghman Jerry Austin Dental injury (special) 31.00 

Paducah Tilghman E. M. Bailey, Jr X-ray 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Charles Blohm X-ray 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bill Bowland X-ray 10.00 

Paducah Tilghman Bill Bruce X-ray 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Myron Collier X-ray 6.00 

Paducah Tilghman Jerry Deese Laceration - suture S.Ofl 



(Continued in the October issue of the ATHLETE) 



-yT gySTQj I^ 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO, Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



SERVICE 

IS OUR MIDDLE IVAME 

Whether your order is for a few special items or for outfitting a complete 
team, we give undivided and personal attention to every order that comes 
to our store. 

As distributors for the VERY BEST MANUFACTURERS of athletic goods, 
namely : 



MACGREGOR 

SPALDING 

KING-0'SHEA 

RIDDELL 

VOIT 

FAIR PLAY 

WILTON 

E. R. MOORE CO 

NISSEN TRAMPOLINE 

SEAMLESS 

BIKE 

CRAMER 



HILLERICH & BRADSBY 

WIGWAM 

NELSON 

POWERS 

GENERAL 

WILSON 

DODGE 

AMERICAN PLAYGROUND 

J&J 

SOUTHERN 

SPANJIAN 

LYON METAL 



We try to make our SERVICE match the quality of the items we sell. 
Each and every item we sell is fully guaranteed. 

If you would like to see our salesman for either football or basketball 
supplies, call us at CH 7-1941 or CH 7-1942. 

ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, C. A. BYRN, JR., or ED HENDLEY are 

always in our store ready to assist you in every way possible. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

INCORPORATED 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

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UTCLIFFE 



COMPANY, INC. 
UISVILLE a, KENTUCKY 





High khoo/ AfhMe 



1 



Jihe i^po'itsman s C^eed 



The Player . . 




1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting-, he loses without excuses, and he never quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 

The Coach ... 

1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type of man he wants his boys to be. 

The Official ... 

1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 

The Spectator. . . 

1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 



Omcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
DCTDBER - 1359 



iiiv ^ 



r 




The Second Guess 

NOTE: The following article appeared in the 
Denver Post Monday, February 16, 1959 as a 
"Second Guess" column by Jack Carberry. Mr. 
Carberry's excellent presentation merits your at- 
tention to a matter of importance to all admin- 
istrators, coaches, parents and players interested 
in educational athletics. 

As this congregation knows I have been 
around the sports beat for a long, long time. 
And for as long as I can remember, I have lis- 
tened to the cry of the loser, "We was 
robbed," to alibi his own or his team's short- 
comings. But in all the years I have never 
witnessed, nor have I heard, anything ap- 
proaching the complaining voiced nowadays 
not only by the spectators, but by players, 
and more especially, the "teachers" of our 
athletics. 

Maybe it is the time in which we live. 
Maybe it is traceable to a world in which 
there is a general distrust of leadership, in 
governments, and in business, and even in 
our social life. Whatever the cause, there is 
in the world of sports a growing disrespect 
for authority — the referees, the umpires, 
the linesmen and the judges. 

Now I am not attempting to put the "blast" 
on any individual or on any particular snort. 
But I want to tell you the story the father 
of a 10-year-old lad told me — a story which 
I think should make every "teacher" of 
American games, coaches and players alike, 
reach a better understanding of their respon- 
sibilities. 

The boy is a member of a South Denver 
Sunday School league. The team, as are the 
other clubs, is sponsored by the dads of the 
various congregations who nrovide the uni- 
forms, pay the cost of hall rent, and other 
expenses. Coaching is provided by various 
church members who give considerable of 
their time. Officiating is on the same volun- 
teer basis. Evei'y effort is made to have the 
families of the players attend the games, the 
thought being that this will aid in producing 
"family togetherness" — a word we hear used, 
and overused, quite frequently. 

This particular father, and his wife, at- 
tended one game last Wednesday night. Both 
came away shocked — and frightened. 

During the course of the game their boy, 
along with his teammates, kept up a con- 
stant screaming, directing their remarks at 
the officials — berating them for their calls, 
and jumping ud from the players' bench to 
emnhasize their disagi'eement by gestures 
which have become all too familiar to basket- 
ball audiences everywhere — the hold of the 
head in both hands, as though in agony, the 



holding of the nose and such cries as "you 
stink," and "you robber, you." 

"I was tempted," said the father, "to go 
down and take my boy off the bench. But I 
feared that might break up the game. But 
when I got him home I sat down with him 
and asked him what he meant by such con- 
duct. 

"Why did you act as you did — surely you 
know the referee, a good friend of ours, would 
not cheat your team, or any team? Did you 
really believe you were being cheated? 

"I was not," the father said, "prepared 
for the answer I got. 

"My boy said : 'No, I did not think we were 
being cheated — I like Mr, (he named the ref- 
eree) very much, and he is a swell guy. But 
he was an official, and all the coaches on the 
big teams, and all the players on the Truck- 
ers and the college teams you take me to see, 
yell at the officials and make signs, and they 
are all good coaches and good players'." 

The boy named one coach in particular — 
truly a capable teacher of the game, but one 
given to histrionics, under the delusion I am 
sure, that he is adding "color" to the game. 

"He (naming the coach) is the best coach 
in the world, and his players are the best 
players and they yell at the officials all the 
time." 

One cannot help but wonder if coaches and 
players on "the big teams," ever give thought 
to what their actions — not alone upon the 
playing field but upon the bench — have upon 
those who view them as their heroes. 

It is serious business. This particular fa- 
ther was undecided as to what he should do. 
His first thought was to take his boy out of 
sports. If sports taught little more than dis- 
respect for authority — and that is exactly 
what such antics as one witnesses in sports 
mean — then sports surely have lost all their 
value. 

If an official is incompetent, be he volun- 
teer in the little Sunday School league, or 
the well-paid referee on the field for the 
"big games," his future services should be 
dispensed with. 

But the growing disrespect for authority 
being exhibited in American sports today 
cries out for corrective action also. 

Monday there were 642 inmates in Den- 
ver's county jail; there were 73 boys and 
girls in Juvenile Hall ; several additonal hun- 
dred were in the state home at Golden. Why ? 
Because 99 ""^ of them lacked all respect for 
authority — of teacher, of minister, of priest, 
of policeman, and of the laws under which we 
live. 

Let us cut out the "play-acting" and play 
ball. — National Federation Press. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXII— NO. 3 



OCTOBER, 1959 



1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside 
or modify any rule. They are interpretations on 
some of the early season situations which have been 
presented. 

Installment II 

24. Play: After expiration of time-out charged 
to Team A but before the ball becomes alive: (a) 
Team A; or (b) Team B requests another charged 
time-out. 

Ruling: Request in both (a) and (b) will be 
denied. No charged time-out may immediately fol- 
low another charged time-out. 

25. Play During the last timed down of the 2nd 
quarter and while a scrimmage or free-kick by Kl 
is rolling beyond the neutral zone: (a) Rl holds 
and kick rolls out-of-bounds; or (b) substitute 
R12 enters field; or (c) there is an unsportsman- 
like conduct foul by Rl; or (d) an unsportsman- 
like conduct foul by K2. 

Ruling: In (a), (b) and (c), if the penalty is not 
declined, the quarter is extended by an untimed 
down. In (d), the penalty is enforced at 2nd half 
kick-off. 

26. Play: Is K considered the Offense during 
a scrimmage or free-kick ? 

Ruling: Yes. K is Offense during the scrimmage 
or free-kick. However, if R gains possession, the 
kick ends and R becomes the Offense. 

27. Play: End A7 charges into the neutral zone 
too soon but returns behind his line without con- 
tact. In response to the movement of AT, defensive 
tackle B6 charges and contacts A7. 

Ruling: False start by A7. 

28. Play: During a successful try, A3 holds B4 
on B's 7. 

Ruling: Penalty is automatically accepted. After 
enforcement, A will put the ball in play on the 
proper yardline anywhere between the inbounds 
lines. 

29. Play: 4th and 10 on R's 40. K2 first touches 
kick on R's 20. R2 then muffs and K3 recovers on 
R's 10. After ball is dead, R3 clips K4 on R's 15. 

Ruling: R may take ball at spot of first touch- 
ing (R's 20) after which the penalty for the foul 
by R3 is enforced. It will be R's ball on their 10; 
1st and 20. 

30. Play: 4th and 10 on B's 15. Al throws a back- 
ward pass toward A2 who bats it forward so that: 
(a) it is caught by tackle A3 on B's 3 yardline and 
carried into the end zone; or (b) it strikes the 
ground and rolls into the end zone where A4 re- 
covers; or (c) it strikes the ground and comes to 
rest on B's 3 where all players refuse to touch it; 
or (d) it goes into the end zone where B bats 
it out-of-bounds behind the goal line. 

Ruling: It is a touchdown in (a) and (b). In 



(c) it is A's ball — 1st and goal line. In (d), if 
A accepts the penalty, it will be 4th and 2 1/2 on 
B's 7 1/2. If the penalty is declined, it is a touch- 
back. 

31. Play: 3rd and 8 on B's 13. Bl holds during 
run which ends on line of scrimmage. Will it be 
first down for A after enforcement? 

Ruling: No. It will be 3rd down, 1 1/2 yards to 
go. 

32. Play. Kl receives snap while standing with 
his left foot on the end line. He kicks and R2 is 
offside. 

Ruling: Ball dead when touched by Kl. If K 
accepts penalty for offside, they put ball in play 
without loss of down. If penalty is declined it is a 
safety. 

33. Play: Team K punter is beyond the end line 
at the snap. He quickly moves into the end zone 
to catch ball. 

Ruling Illegal participation. 

34. Play: Fumble by Al is in flight when Bl 
jumps and gets it in his hands. He conies to the 
ground with a foot on or outside a sideline. 

Ruling: Official must decide when Bl secured 
possession. The second sentence of 7-5-4 specifically 
covers a forward pass in a similar situation but 
there is no specific coverage for a backward pass 
or a fumble. Since nearly all such cases involve 
doubt, it is best to apply the foi-ward pass prin- 
ciple and rule that ball is not in B's possession in 
the case as outlined. 

35. Play: Team B has only 10 players on the 
field at snap. Long forward pass by Al crosses 
line of scrimmage and is then batted dovim by Bll, 
who has run onto the field. 

Ruling: Illegal substitution. If A accepts penalty 
B is penalized 5 yards from previous spot. (In ob- 
vious situations it can be unfair act (9-7-1).) 

36 Play: Ineligible Al is legally several yards 
beyond the neutral zone because of having driven 
Bl back from the line with a block. Forward pass 
by A2 accidently touches ineligible Al. Pass is de- 
flected and: (a) eligible A3 catches it; or (b) it 
is intercepted by B3. 

Ruling: Pass is completed in both (a) and (b) 
and ball may be advanced. Accidental touching by 
Al is ignored. 

37. Play: After eligible Al catches a forward 
pass while he is in the air in B's end zone, he is 
carried by an opponent so that he alights out-of- 
bounds or in the field of play. 

Ruling: Touchdown. 

38. Play: 1st and 10 on A's 3. Runner Al fumbles 
on his 2 yardline. Bl intentionally kicks loose ball 
which is (a) on A's 2; or (b) in the end zone. Ball 
then goes out-of-bounds behind the goal line. 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



Pajje Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 



OCTOBER, 1959 



VOL. XXII— NO. 3 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1056-601. Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones. (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(195S-62) Franklin: Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsythe (1959-63). Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63). 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

Jrom the Commissioned s Qjfjice 

The Cross Country Run 

The K.H.S.A.A. will attempt to set up seven reg- 
ional cross country meets, scheduled to be held on 
Saturday, October .31, 1959. The sites are Paducah, 
Bowling- Green, Clarkson, Louisville, Bellevue, Berea, 
and Morehead. Entry blanks will be sent to the 
principals of all member schools who have indicated 
that they plan to sponsor cross country teams this 
year. The state cross country run is scheduled to 
be held in Lexington on November 14. 
Employment Bureaus 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials have 
been established. Each reg-istered official should 
file at once with his bureau head and/or the near- 
est bureau head his schedule of fi'ames and a list 
of dates on which the official will be available to 
call games. Although the bureaus have been set up 
primarily for basketball, the men in charge will be 
glad to assist officials and schools in filling open 
football dates. The names of the bureau heads, with 
their residence and business phone numbers are as 
follows: 

Region 1. Rex Alexander, Murray State College, 
Murray; Res. No., PL 3-3579; Bus. No., PL 3-2310. 

Region 2. Charles Irwin, Route 4, Hopkinsville; 
Res. No., TU 6-4820; Bus. No., TU 6-4820. 

Region 3. Roy G. Settle, 1413 St. Mary's Ave., 
Owensboro; Res. No., MU 3-2136; Bus. No., MU 
3-3574. 

Region 4. Joe Richardson, Greenville; Res. No. 
1077W; Bus. No., 48. 

Region 5. James Jenkins, 1538 State, Bowling 
Green; Res. No., VI 2-0097; Bus. No., VI 2-.5954. 

Region 6. Howard Gardner, Route 3, Elizabeth- 
town; Res. No., .5-6273; Bus. No., Fort Knox 4-7129. 

Region 7. Dave Longenecker, 3910 Olympic Ave., 
Louis'ville; Res. No., TW 6-9071; Bus. No., TW 
5-3401. 

Claude 0. Ricketts, 10217 Starlight Way, Valley 
Station; Res. No., WA 1-9583; Bus. No., ME 4-1551. 

Region 8. Elmo Head, 113 Alton Road, Shelbyville; 
Res. No., ME 3-4220. 

Region 9. John Schaar, Bellevue High School, 
Bellevue; Res. No., CO 1-5069; Bus. No., CO 1-2980. 

Region 10. Bennie Bridges, North Middletown; 
Res. No., 4392; Bus. No., 2291. 

Region 11. Harry Stephenson, Transylvania Col- 
lege, Lexington; Res. No., 4-9620; Bus. No. 4-2431. 

Region 12. Briscoe Inman, Centre College, Dan- 
ville; Res. No., 3075; Bus. No., 1900. 



Region 13. W. E. Nau, Box 10, Barboui-ville; Res. 
No., 203; Bus. No., 317. 

Region 14. Paul Wright, 349 Broadway, Hazard; 
Res. No., GE 6-4277. 

Region 15. Dick Looney, Riverview Dr., Pikeville; 
Res. No., GE 7-6410; Bus. No., GE 7-6410. 

Region 16. Ernie Chattin, Y.M.C.A., Ashland; 
Res. No., 1088; Bus. No., EA 4-6191. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

lL-:st Compiled October ll 
If one telephone number is given for an official Isited. it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Alston. E. Deedom, 1016 S. 43rd. Louisville. SP 2-1092. JU 7-6129 
Bell. Thomas P., 1843 Glennhill Dr.. Lexington. 6-2964. 2-8596 
Black. Charles D., 138 Pine St.. Barbourville. 6-4148. 6-4167 
Bond. Jack C. 2057 Clays Mill Rd.. Lexington. 7-2351. 2-2250. 

Ext. 2677 
Bowman. Earl G. "Dick". 689 Mt. Vernon Dr., Lexington, 

fi-SlU, 2-3343 
Briscoe. Edward D., Jr.. 2181 Tvler Lane. Louisville. GL 8-1438 
Broderick. Carroll A.. Helm Hotel. Bowling Green, 2-5636, 

3-9107 
Bryant, Thomas H., 4316 Dover Rd., Louisville. EM 8-7976, 

JU 4-5435 
Buckson, Rodnev L.. USAMRL, Ft. Knox. 4-6135. 4-6636 
Chattin. Ernie. 2147 Central. Ashland. 1088. East 4-6191 
Clark, B. W.. 1346 Friedman Lane. Route 7, Paducah 2-2205, 

5-6311. Ext. 681 
Clark. Owen B.. Route 1. Georetown 
Cole. Harold. Heidrick, LI fi-3394. LI 6-4167 
Coulter, William, 807 Taylor Avenue, Evansville. Ind., HA 

3-7610, HA 4-8268 
Cox, William J., 528 Tennessee Ave., Pineville. Ed 7-3209, 

Harlan 721 
Craig. Randy. 4676 Delhi Road, Cincinnati 38. Ohio, BL 1-1650, 

GR 1-5545 
Grain, Donald J., 245 Flemingsburg Rd., Morehead, State 4-5294 
Creasey. Fred. Sebree 
Gulp. Cant. Willard E.. Co B. 326th Eng. Bn., Ft. Campbell, 

4048. 3500 
Dahlander. Ward M., 507 Indian Ridge Rd.. Louisville, TW 

5-6273, JU 5-2356 
Dallmann, James E.. 12 Center St.. Jeffersonville. Ind., BU 

3-7255 
Daniel. Ernest H.. 810 23rd St., Ashland. EA 4-2780. EA 4-7910 
Daniels. Robert M.. 112 MilitaiT. Georgetown, 7-6036. Frankfort 

(Bus. No.) 
Davis. Charles A.. Benham. VI 8-2093. VI 8-5406 
Davis, Webster Curtis, 1119 E. Burnett, Louisville, ME 4-4959, 

JU 2-3511 
Dickerson, T. L.. Jr., 647 So. 19th. Louisville, SP 8-0605, 

JU 3-1724 
Dixie, C. P.. 608 So. Clay. Louisville. JU 7-7680. EM 6-9561 
Dixon. Sam. Appalachia High School. Apoalachia. Va. 
Fandrick. William W.. Route 4. Murray. PL .3-3193. PL 3-3193 
Figg. Charles Raymond. 1008 Navaho Trail. Frankfort, CA 

7-2146. CA 3-0565 
Fishback. Olen W.. 9720 Galene. Jeffersontown. AN 7-1700 
Gillespie. Robert C. Box 982, Pikeville. G 7-7943. G 7-7190 
Gour, Robert A., 139 Media Dr.. Bowling Green, 3-9582. 3-4334, 

Ext. 27 
Griffin. Wilbert. 52d Ord. Co.. Ft. Campbell. GE 9-3914, B012 
Grooms, Randall D.. A. H. Dept. Univ. of Ky., Lexington, 

2-2712. 2-2200, Ext. 2372 
Hale. H. Ed. 421 Locust. Lexington 
Harris, James B., Co. B Spec. Tng. Regt., Ft. Knox, 4-5518 

4-8228 
Harris, Russell. 368 Boiling Springs Dr., Lexington. 4-6525 
Harvey, Ralph B.. 1513 Slate Run Rd., New Albany. Ind., 

WH 4-4071, JU 7-3187 
Holstein, Herbert B.. Guyan Valley H. S., Branchland, W. Va. 
Johnson. Frank. Box 122, College Heights, Bowling Green, 

3-8192 .3-8326 
Kauffman. Victor C.. 3635 W. 8th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

WA 1-9230, PO 1-4100, Ext. 1803 
Lambert. Irvin G., 303 Maruader, Louisville, GL 8-6671, GL 

8-1948 
Lewis, Richard Q.. Jr.. 409 W. 1st St.. Hopkinsville. TU 6-4032 
Lucas. William Smith. Jr., c/o College of the Bible, Lexington 
McManus, Luther M., Jr.. 5628-B. Conroy Ave.. Ft. Knox. 4-6960 
McNabb. Edgar, 137 Pleasant Ridge. So. Ft. Mitchell. ED 1-3113, 

ED 1-1220 
McQuilling. Gerald. 2011 S. Lombard, Evansville, Ind., 

GR 6-6941. HA 5-3311 
Miller, Sgt. Kenneth H., 4165 B-Gaffey Hts., Ft. Knox, 4-1854 

(Bus. No.) 
Moran. Warren Carl. 3104 Horton Ave.. Louisville 5, GL 

R-6178. SP 2-3661 
Mudd. Ed. 3512 Mildred Dr., Louisville 16, SP 6-6SS8 
Myers, Lee E.. P. O. Box 46. Big Stone Gap. Va. 
Nord, Bertrand J., 1523 Hoertz, Louisville, ME 4-9065, ME 

4-0561 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 



Page Three 



Palmer, Carl A., 2506 So. 7th, Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6244 

Peden. Harlan, 206 Garmon Ave., Glasgow 

Pence, William M., 4810 C Rose Terrace, Ft. Knox, WI 2-2615, 

4-7740 Ft. Knox 
Pettis, Carl, Jr., B Co 326th Engr Bn., Ft. Campbell, MI 

7-4374, 3500 
Pinson, Eugene, 3208 Hackworth, Ashland, EA 4-6548, EA 

4-3101 
Powell, Logan, 817 Delia Dr., Lexington, 5-1653. 2-3255 
Richards, James S., 334 E. 15th Street, Bowling Green, 2-1133 
Rivlin, Jule, Marshall College, Huntington 1, W. Va. 
Rogers, Harry K., Jr. 76 Blade Ave., Frankfort, CA 3-8236, 

CA 7-4511 
Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 1020 Parkway Dr., Louisville, ME 4-0737, 

ME 5-7441 
Saylor, Ben H., 312 Van Dorn, Corbin, 2187, 2187 
Schmitt, Karl F., 710 E. Walnut, Louisville 2 
Schutz, John J., Jr., Hickory Grove, New Albany, Ind,, WH 

4-6984 
Shumate, Roy V., Benham, VI 8-2539, VI 8-5406 
Sloan, Wally, 419 Oread Rd., Louisville, TW 5-1126; TW 7-2564 

6-6316 
Sloan, Wally, 419 Dread Rd., Louisville, TW 5-1126, TW 7-2554 
Smith, J. E., 4306 W. Broadway, Louisville, SP 4-2718. ME 

7-4008 
Snook, Patrick, 3606 St. Germaine, Louisville TU 3-3703 
Stone, Clifton, 2930 Oak Hill Rd., Evansville, Ind., GR 6-2918, 

HA 3-7252 
Swope, William, 438 Price Rd., Lexington, 5-2458 
Trautwein, James R., 3516 Brockton, Louisville, GL 8-7438, 

GL 4-3449 
VanMeter, John Wm., Jr., 1933 Oliv 

JU 7-6656 
Vinciguerra, Philip, Matewan, W. Va. 

Watts, Shirley R., 802 Carneal, Lexington, 5-2743, 2-5494 
Whipple, Lloyd G., 216 Frederick, Evansville, Ind., GR 6-5809, 

HA 3-7262 
ns, James H., 2428 Adams, Ashland, E 5-2733, E 4-8282 
ns, Smythe Jack, 315 Murrell, Frankfort, CA 7-7016 

Donald A., P. O. Box 163, Prestonsburg 
1, Jack R., 617 W. Main, Morehead, ST 4-6524, ST 4-4186 
Wise, Billy, 2112 St. Teresa, Lexington, 6-7449, 2-5494, 2-0410 
Womack, William H., 1204 Loeb, Henderson, VA 6-4626, VA 



Louis 



1-6032, 



Willi: 
Willi: 
Willii 
Wilso 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Allen, Lowry R., Route 1. Bowling Green, 3-9346, 3-8658 
Amburgey, Jesse, May's Lick, SO 3-2860, SO 3-2846 
Ashley, Kenneth, Science Hill, 19 
Baker, Fred, Route 6, London, VO 4-5027 
Bartley. Robert E., Hellier, SK 4-8376 
Bailey, Arville, Flat Gap, AM 5-2862, AM 5-2945 
Bankemper. Thomas F., 317 E. 7th Street, Newport, JU 1-5047 
Barry, Harold L., 1618 Cumberland Ave., Middlesboro, 2731 
Beard, Monie, 617 Hampton Rd., Bowling Green, Victor 3-8848, 

Victor 3-6036 
Benedict, Johnny, Virgie, 19, 12 

Bennett, Bert A., 14 Doris Dr., Covinyton, JU 1-2121, HE 1-6157 
Beringer, William F., 907 Maple Ave., Dayton, CO 1-7152, 



CO 1-7152 
Black, Charles D., 
Beringer, William 

CO 1-7152 
Black, Charles D., 1 



138 Pine St., Barbourville, 6-4148. 6-4167 
F., 907 Maple Ave., Dayton, CO 1-7162, 



; St., Barbourville, 6-4148, 6-4167 
Blankenship, Zeb, Route 6, Richmond, 2229-M. 583 
Blanton, Leonard, 2117 Washington St, Flatwoods, Grand 1352, 

638 
Blevins, Boone, Jr., Staffordsville, 1181 J 3 (Bus. No.) 
Boehm, Robert R., 2333 Bath Ave., Ashland 
Boggs, Janis. Webbville 

Borden, W. B. "Jack", Cave City, PY 3-3364, PY 3-3671 
Bowman, Earl G. "Dick", 689 Mt. Vernon Dr., Lexington, 

Briscoe, Hubert, Route 3, Shelbyville, ME 3-4669, ME 3-2643 
Broderick, Carroll, Helm Hotel, Bowling Green, 2-5636, 3-9107 
Brooks, James A., Box 120, Betsy Layne, GR 8-2366 
Brown, Bryant, Box 201, Owensboro, MU 4-5438, MU 3-2401, 

Ext. 298 
Brown, Eddie, 16 Bustetter Dr., Florence, AT 3-6114 (Bus. No.) 
Brown, James A., 421 Wayne Dr.. Hopkinsville, TU 6-6308 
Bruner, Jack C, 133 Mahan Ave., London, VO 4-4322, VO 4-6189 
Bryan, William B., Route 4, Paris, 4228 

Bunnell, Kenneth L., Munfordville, JA 4-3361, JA 4-3341 
Burchett, Lanier S., 1007 Appen Ave., Columbia, Fulton 4-2654, 

Fulton 4-4111 
Burkley, Bud, 8123 Patton Dr., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Burton, Charlie, West Office, Harrodsburg 262-J 
Butts, Delbert, 212 Mulberry, Carlisle, 144 J, 144 R 
Carr, Gene P., 816 17th, Ashland, East 4-8566 
Carroll, Joe E., Falcon 
Chattin, Charles, 2325 Harrod St., Ashland, EA 4-5385, EA 

4-6464 



Louisville 11, 



Chambers, William Virgil, 261 North Third St., Danville, 2543 

Chattin, Ernie, 2147 Central, Ashland, 1088. East 4-6191 

Chumbler, W. W., 1307 S. 9th, Mayfield. CH 7-3658, CH 7-2656 

Clark, Harold B., Livingston 

Clarkston, Glenn, 226 May Street. Harlan. 1564-W 

Clary. Kenneth. 626 Powell St.. Henderson. VA 7-3320 

Cohen. Robert S., 248 Larch Lane, Lexington, 2-8956, 5-3880 

Cole, Harold, Headrick, LI 6-3394, LI 6-4167 

Colgan, Donald L., Flemingsburg. VI 5-6511. VI 5-3671 

Conley, Ted L.. 3227 Walters Hill Dr., Ashland. EA 4-2912 

Conn. Hershel, Betsy Layne, GR 8-4366. GR 8-2265 

Cooper. Warren. Barbour. Morehead, St. 4-5615. St. 4-4390 

Correll, Bernard Lee. 606 Military St.. Georgetown. 761-W 

Cox. William J.. 628 Tennessee Ave., Pineville, ED 7-3209, 

Harlan 721 
Craig, John G., Rochester, 83 
Crank, Buck, 26th Street, Box 12, Ashland, 64 
Cropper, William C, Route 2, May's Lick, SO 3-2602 
Gulp, Willard E.. Co. B. 326th Eng. Bn., Ft. Campbell, 4048, 

3500 
Davis, Dwight R., Jr., 3616 Hycliff Ave., Louisville 7, TW 6-7302 

JU 4-1361, E.xt. 7179 
Davis. Webster Curtis, 1119 E. Burnett. Louisville, ME 4-4959, 

JU 2-3611 
Demunbrun, Murphy M., 227 So. Green, Glasgow. 2-630, 5-165 
Denney. Billy L., 1420 Packard, Ashland, EA 4-8464 
Dodson, Kenneth. 416 South 10th. Mayfield. CH 7-3884, 3-4534 

Paducah 
Dotson, John B., Route 1, Box 291 A., Harrisburg, Illinois, 

CL 3-6973 
Driskell, Earl. Jr., 650 So. 44th St., Apt. 

SP 8-5943 
Edmiston, Raymond Lee, 442 Weldon, 
Edwards, Donald A., 119 E. Main St., 
Edwards, Hugh Richard. Route 2. Hardyville, LA 8-2187 
Edwards, Lloyd. Prestonsburg, 2908 
Ellington, James E., Box 841, Hazard, GE 6-3648 
Elliott, Carroll L., 214 Sunset Rd., Elizabethtown, RO 5-9707, 

RO 6-6118 
Ellis, Walter H., Route 1. Box 188, West Paducah 
Farmer. Ralph, Ruth Rd., Somerset 

Feix, Albert J., 2110 Cabell Dr., Bowling Green, VI 2-9636 
Figg, Charles Raymond, 1008 Navaho Trail, Frankfort, CA 

7-2146, CA 3-0565 
Fitzwater, Charles C, 112 Market, Cynthiana. 242-R. 1450 
Foster, William R. "Bob," Science Hill, 234 Science Hill, 593 

or 694 Somerset 
Fleenor, Francis J., 223 Sharon Dr., Bowling Green, VI 2-2185, 

VI 2-0308 
Fuson, Shelvie, 312 Englewood Rd., Middlesboro, 1541, 263 
Gabbard, John B., 320 N. Hill, London, VO 4-6915. VO 4-2862 
Gambill. Roger. P. O. Box 6. Blaine. OL 2-3164 
Gilbert. Gerald L., Tunnel Hill Rd., Elizabethtown, Ft. Knox 

4-6914 (Bus. No.) 
Gillespie, Robert C, Box 982, Pikeville. G 7-7934. G 7-7190 
Goodin. Shirley G.. Four Mile, Edgewood 7-2031 
Goff, Reathel, 402 Vet Village, College Heights, Bowling Green 
Gourley, Harold E.. 1700 N. Alvord Blvd., Evansville, Ind., 

GR 6-6191, HA 3-4016 
Greathouse, Bobby, Old Scottsville Rd., Bowling Green, VI 2-2568 
Griese, Warren J., Route 1, Box 226-5, Evansville, Ind., 'YU 

6-2880, HA 3-4012 
Grisham, Jesse R., 1627 Roosevelt, Henderson, VA 7-1035 
Grooms, Randall D., A. H. Dept., Univ. of Ky., Lexington, 

2-2712, 2-2200. Ext. 2372 
Groves, Glendal R., Route 2, Hopkinsville, TU 6-3567 
Hackel, John C, Jr., 3400 Burrell Dr.. Louisville 16, EM 8-8207, 

EM 3-3511, Ext. 2248 
Haines, William E., P. O. Box 673, Russell, Oak 861 
Hagedorn, Thomas. 1907 Howell, Covington, AX 1-5793 
Hardin, Ben W.. Marrowbone, GE 3-2120, 2276 
Hargis, Bobby S.. Box 3, Calvert City, EX 5-4849, EX 6-4181 
Harris. Charles A.. Box 749. Harlan. 2676. 87-J 
Harris. Joe, Nebo, CL 9-3561 

Hendrickson, Clarence M., P. O. Box 106, Loyall, 1292. 57 
Hewling. Franklin C, 1125 Orchard St., Newport, CO 1-7380, 

GA 1-3700 
Hill, Earl F., London, VO 4-2521 
Hobby, Bill, 127 Highland. Princeton. 5195, 6780 
Hoggard. Robert L.. 1409>.'. Center St.. Bowling Green 
Holmes. Mike. Mannington. OR 6-3313. OR 6-3461 
Holt. Robert E.. 600 Sanderson Dr.. Hopkinsville. TU 6-1738, 

TU 6-1207 
Hopper. Edv/in. Box 183. Russell Springs. UN 6-7393 
Hoskins. Charles. 1228 West Woodlawn. Louisville 
Huter. James J., 3643 Vermont Ave., Louisville, SP 6-0707, 

Henryville, Ind., 3931 
James, Gene, 315 Park Ave., Ironton, Ohio. JE 2-6976, JE 

2-7724 
Jenkins, James D., 1538 State, Bowling Green, 2-0097, 2-5954 
Johnson, Charles W., Virgie, Virgie 28 

Johnson, Frank, Box 122 College Heights, Bowling Green 
Johnson, John Luther, Shelby Gap 

Jones. Boyer, 437 Jackson, Campbellsville, 607-M, 184 
Justice, Morris W., Scott Ave., Pikeville 
Key. Calvin. Hazel. HY 2-3431. HY 2-2341 
Kidd. Roy. 116 Longview Dr.. Richmond. 1703. 583 
King. Russell. 943 Whitney. Lexington. 4-3049 
Knight, Bill, 725 N. 36th Street, Paducah. 3-2776. 3-2775 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 



Kok, George W., 8509 Summer Haven Ct., Pleasure Ridge 

Park, WE 7-5436, WA 1-9230 
Lambert, Kenneth L., 221 Bayard Pike Dd., Evansville, Ind., 

GE 6-6146, HA 6-5252 
Lamphere, Richard "Dick", 2568 Clay, Paducah, 5-7442, 2-2726 
Lewis, Howard, 939 Florence, Louisville, EM 6-6911, CH 5-4161 
LeGrand, Leaston, Box 132, Hanson, DA 2-3431, TA 1-6333 
Little, James Glenn, Hellier, SK 4-8377 
Littral, James W., 460 Locust Ave., Lexington, 3-0354, 3-3335 

Station 1 
Logsdon, David, 1160 Lincoln, Louisville, ME 7-3192, SP 6-3921 
Logue, Ronald Gene, 223 S. Fourth, Danville, 337-276 (Bus. No.J 
Lucas, William Smith, Jr., 204 Catalpa, Lexington 
Lykins, Joe D., Malone 

McBrayer Donald E., 705 Williams St., Raceland, Park 1061 
McCargo, Frank, Route 2, Hopkinsville TU 6-4532, TU 5-9400 
McClelland, Amos E., 3739 Penway Ave., Louisville 10, SP 

4-1071, JU 7-1292 
McClellan, Leonard B., Jr., 2512 Goldsmith Lane, Louisville 5, 

GL 8-2598, JU 7-9111, Ext. 3B 
McGlasson, Galen, 212 Sorth Bend Rd., Hebron, MU 9-7330, 

MU 9-7330 
McQuilling, Gerald, 2011 S. Lombard, Evansville, Ilnd., OR 

6-6941, HA 5-3311 
Maines, George, 3418 Terrace Dr., Erlanger, DI 1-7460, DI 1-7460 
Maner. Charles, Box 14, Longacre, W. Va. 
Marble, Luke, Greensburg, Web 2-5610, WEB 2-5371 
Mayes, Edward, 838 Crossbill Rd., Danville, 986-R, 1008 
Mays, Ralph J., Heidrick, LI 6-3956 
Meier, Dwight L., 208 Walnut, Wilmore, UL 8-3572 
Meredith, Denny E„ Jr. 637 E. Walnut, Louisville, JU 3-0566 
Miller, Koy L., Belton, GR 6-2666 
Moore, James E., Route 5, Box 91A, London, VO 4-2054, 1915, 

Corbin 
Miley, Robert L., 625 California Ct., Paducah, 3-6232, 2-1641 
Moser, Emerson, General Delivery, Sebree 
Mudd. Ed., 3512 Mildred Dr., Louisville 16, 6-6888 
Mulligan, J. T., 427 Center, Erlanger, DI 1-5628, DI 1-6628 
Myers, Edward B., 312 Seay St., Glasgow, OL 1294 
Nail, Samuel R., College Station, Murray 
Nelson. William O., Route 1, Greenville 520J 
Noble, Charles, 1164 Main, Jackson. NO 6-2728, NO 6-9224 
O'Daniel, Jeff, Route 1, Lebanon 723 L 
Palmer. Carl A., 2506 So. 7th, Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6244 
Patterson, Clem, Box 303, Morehead State College, Morehead 
Pearson, Bobby Neal, Beechmont 
Peay, Curtis E., 118 N. Sunrise Dr., Bowling Green, VI 3-8171, 

VI 3-8171 
Penrod, Joe B., 1203 Locust, Owensboro, MU 3-8773, MU 4-1175 
Perkins. William E., 108 E. Thomas, Lexington 
Pierce, John W., Route 2, Corydon, VA 6-9816 
Pike, Robert F., 3F Robinson Terrace, Richmond 
Prichard. Glenn W., Crum, W. Va., Kermit 2125, Greenleaf 

5-2411 
Prior, Lowell F., 1722 Highland, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-0700, 

EL 3-6129 
Purdy, George D., Bradfordsville, 9004 
Quigg, Ben F., IV, Third St., Livermore, BR 8-2520 
Reding, Richard Keith, Box 1237 College Station, Murry 
Rickard, Bob, Bremen 

Ring, William H., 107 Watson Ct., Frankfort, CA 7-4096, 
VA 7-2281, Ext. 495 

Risen, John B. 197 3rd Street, Ravenna, 276-R, 106 
Roach, Earl Wilton, Route 1, Mayfield, FA 8-3642, Fulton, Ky., 

2060 
Robinson, Don, 116 Butler St., Frankfort, CA 3-3801, CA 3-3424 
Roby, Joseph L., 2325 Hardinsburg Rd., Owensboro, MU 3-6838, 

MU 3-2703 
Rose, Lee H., Route 3, Paris Pk., Lexington, 4-0087, 4-2431 
Rosenbaum, Robert L., 117 Fairlawn Rd., Louisville, TW 7-2833, 

JU 4-8191 
Rush, Ralph R., Box 68, London. VO 4-6057 
Sallee, Charles M., P. O. Box 57, Evansville, Ind., HA 2-8626, 

HA 3-1179 
Samples, Gilbert, 602 Johnson, London. VO 4-6825, VO 4-2181 
Scott, Emmanuel H., 1614 Potter Place, Cincinnati 7, Ohio, 

AU 1-6928. MU 1-6150 
Scott, Luther, 211 Spruce St., Murray, PL 3-4649 
Sheffer, Darrell L., 317 E. Maxwell St., Lexington, 3-0582 
Seale, John D., Box 34, Booneville, Ly 3-2561. Ly 3-2545 
Seelye. Arthur L., 2309 Jones, Paducah, 5-7776 
Shivley, Howard, Jr., Radcliff, EL 7-3226, EL 1-3732 
Shuck. Thomas G.. 960 Stonewall, Lexington, 7-1432, 2-2818 
Small, Rex, 300 E. 27th, Owensboro. MU 4-2845. MU 3-2431 
Smith, Donald J., Gray Hawk, AT 7-2150 
Snowden, Ken, 833 Hilltop, Danville, 2387, 708 
Spencer. Irvin, 10414 Sunlight Dr., Valley Station, WA 1-0418, 

WE 7-2300 
Stanfill, Robert S., Louisa, ME 8-4014, EA 4-111, Ext. B57 

Ashland 
Stephens, Kenneth H.. P. O. Box 102, Stearns, 191 R3, 103 
Stinson, Charles L., Maple St., Horse Cave, ST 6-7071, ST 

6-7131 
Strohowski. Michael J., 6597 Larry Lane, Louisville 19, WO 

9-7747, JU 3-1366 
Stull. Woodson. Frenchburg 
Stutler. John P., 2715 Queen City, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, HU 

1-9961, PA 1-2551 



Sumner, Harold Carl, 1855, Heaton Ed., LK>uisvilIe, EM 8-3647, 

WH 4-8585 
Swope. William, 438 Price Rd., Lexington, 5-2468 
Thoma, M. L., 116 Holly, Berea, 520 
Trivette. John Bill, Pikeville 

Tolle, Lewis D., 225 N. Church, Cynthiana, 1436, 235 
Toy, Eddie N., 436 Vista Ck. Mt. Sterling, 186, 7 
Varble, William E., 1706 Cypress, Louisville, SP 5-6712, SP 

2-3621 
Vinciguerra, Philip, Matewan, W. Va. 
Wallace, James H., 1232 Corregidor, Evansville, Ilnd., GE 

6-2622, HA 4-6481, Ext. 219 
Wallen, Edgar, 29011/. Central Ave., Ashland, EA 4-8638, 

EA 4-3177 
Wallen, Howard W., Williamsport 
Walls, Harry B., 1310 Walter, Louisville, EM 6-3454 
Ward, Eddie D., 602 So. Lime, Frankfort, CA 3-1604, Peaks 

Mill School 
Warner, Marvin, Nancy 
Watson. Clifford L., 332 McCullum Rd., Route 1, Independence, 

FI 7-3331 
Wheeler, Jimmie, Route 3, P. O. Box 187, Somerset 
Whipple, Lloyd G., 216 Frederick, Evansville, GR 6-5809, HA 

3-7262 
Whitehouse. Donald, 1202 Fontaine Ed., Lexington 
Whitfield. Eobert B., Jr., 2902 Frederica St., Owensboro, MU 

3-5036 
Williams, James H., 2428 Adams St., Ashland, E 5-2733, 

E 4-8282 
Williams, Eoger, Box 166, Eichmond, 2407 
Williams. Smythe Jack, 315 Murrell, Frankfort, CA 7-7016 
Williams, Tom M., Jr., 116 E. Broadway, Bardstown. FI 8-3079 
Willis, Robert A., 2916 W. Walnut St., Louisville, SP 8-1391, 

JU 5-2261, Ext. 282 
Wilson, H. G., 205 N. Maple St., Somerset, 1542W, 1035E 
Wilson, Ray, 21 Burnham, Green Hills, Ohio, JA 1-4277, JA 

1-3286 
Wingfield, 1134 Eastern Parkway, Louisville 
Wise, Billy, 2112 St. Teresa, Lexington, 6-7449, 2-5494, 2-0410 
Womack, William H., 1204 Loeb, Henderson, VA 6-4526, VA 

6-9568 
Woodward, Dui-wood, Box 253, Nortonville, OR 6-3109, TA 

1-6463 
Yates, William D., Route 2, Fulton, 1680-R, 9176 
Zody, William T., 340 Bacon St., Harrodsburg, 1093-J 

Corrections 
Goley, Jim, 31 Wallace Ave.. Florence. AT 3-2812, CO 1-0520 
Irwin, Charles R., Route 4, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4820, TU 6-4820 
Settle, Roy G.. 1413 St. Mary's Ave., Owensboro, MU 3-2136, 

MU 3-3674 



Weight Training 

Vern Wolfe, North Phoenix, Arizona high 
School's outstanding Track Coach, recently 
lectured at a track clinic in Chicago in con- 
nection with the Pan-American Games. The 
clinic was .sponsored by the Olympic Games 
Committee and the National Track Coaches' 
Association. Coach Wolfe's topic was "De- 
veloping National High School Champions." 
It will be recalled that within the past decade, 
Coach Wolfe has tutored three national 
champions: James Brewer in the pole vault 
(15 feet) ; Dallas Long in the 12-lb. shot 
(69 feet 3 inches) ; and Karl Stanly John- 
stone in the discus (3 lbs. 9 ounces). In his 
lecture at the track clinic Coach Wolfe 
strongly advocated a program of weight 
training in preparing athletes for inter- 
scholastic competition. He predicted weight 
training programs would be used widely 
throughout the country in basketball, base- 
ball, football and track, as well as for wrestl- 
ing, within the next five years. He also 
recommended the hop, step and jump as well 
as the steeple-chase be included in inter- 
scholastic track programs. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 



Page Five 



Member Schools of the K. H. S. A. A. 



The following schools are members of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association for the year ending" June 30, 1960. 
Principals of member schools should check this list carefully to 



see if the names of schools 


with which they have scheduled 


games are included. This lisl 


t was compiled and sent to the 


printer on October 1. A supplementary list ef member schools 


joining in October will appear in the November issue of the 


magazine. 




Adair County 


Buckeye 


(Columbia) 


(Lancaster) 


Adairville 


Buckhorn 


Allen County 


Bunche 


(Scottsville) 


(Glasgow) 


Almo 


Burgin 


Alvaton 


Burnside 


Anderson 


Bush 


(Lawrenceburg) 


(Lida) 


Annville Institute 


Butler 


Ashland 


(Louisville) 


Attucks 


Butler County 


(Hopkinsville) 


(Morgantown) 


Auburn 


Caldwell County 


Augusta 


(Princeton) 


Austin Tracy 


Calhoun 


(Austin) 


Camargo 


Bagdad 


(Mt. Sterling) 


Ballard Memorial 


Campbell County 


(Barlow) 


(Alexandria) 


Barbourville 


Campbellsburg 


Bardstown 


Canvpbellsville 


Bate 


Camp Dick Robinson 


(Danville) 


(Lancaster) 


BeecWood 


Caneyville 


(S. Ft. Mitchell) 


Carlisle County 


Belfry 


(Bardwell) 


Bell County 


Carlisle 


(Pineville) 


Carrollton 


Bellevue 


Carter 


Benham 


Catlettsburg 


Benton 


Cavema 


Berea 


(Horse Cave) 


Black Star 


Centertown 


(Alva) 


Central 


Blaine 


(Louisville) 


Bloomfield 


Central City 


Boone County 


Chandler's Chapel 


(Florence) 


(Auburn) 


Booker T. Washington 


Charleston 


(Ashland) 


(Dawson Springs) 


Bourbon County 


Clark County 


(Paris) 


(Winchester) 


Bowling Green 


Clarkson 


Boyd County 


Clay County 


(Ashland) 


(Manchester) 


Bracken County 


Clay 


(Brooksville) 


Clifty 


Breathitt County 


Clinton County 


(Jackson) 


(Albany) 


Breckinridge County 


Community 


(Hardinsburg) 


(Drakesboro) 


Breckinridge Training 


Corbin 


(Morehead) 


Cordia 


Bremen 


(Hazard) 


Bristow 


Crittenden County 


(Bowling Green) 


(Marion) 


Brodhead 


Cuba 


Bryan Station 


(Mayfield) 


(Lexington) 


Cub Run 



Cumberland 
Cynthiana 
Dalton 
Danville 
Daviess County 

(Owensboro) 
Dawson Springs 
Dayton 
Deming 

(Mt. Olivet) 
Dike Combs Memorial 

(Jeff) 
Dixie Heights 

(S. Ft. Mitchell) 
Dixon 
Dorton 
Dotson 

(Princeton) 
Douglass 

(Henderson) 
Douglass 

(Lexington) 
Douglass 

(Murray) 
Drakesboro 
DuBois 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Dunbar 

(Mayfield) 
Dunbar 

(Morganfield) 
Dunham 

(Jenkins) 
Durham 

(Campbellsville) 
Durrett 

(Louisville) 
Earlington 
East Benham 

(Benham) 
Eastern 

(Middletown) 
East Main Street 

(Lynch) 
Edmonson County 

(Brownsville) 
Elizabethtown 
Elizabethtown Catholic 
Elkhorn City 
Eminence 
Estill County 

(Irvine) 
Eubank 
Evarts 
Ezel 
Fairdale 
Falmouth 
Fancy Farm 
Farmington 
Feds Creek 
Fern Creek 
Flaget 

(Louisville) 
Flaherty 

(Vine Grove) 
Flat Gap 



Fleming County 

(Flemingsburg) 
Fleming-Neon 

(Fleming) 
Fordsville 
Forkland 

(Gravel Switch) 
Fort Knox 
Frankfort 
Franklin County 

(Frankfort) 
Franklin-Simpson 

(Franklin) 
Frederick Fraize 

(Cloverport) 
Fredericktown 

(Springfield) 
Fredonia 
Fulton 
Fulton County 

(Hickman) 
Gallatin County 

(Warsaw) 
Gamaliel 
Georgetowm 
Glasgow 
Glendale 
Graham 
Grant County 

(Dry Ridge) 
Greensburg 
Greenup 
Greenville 
Guthrie 
Haldeman 
Hall 

(Grays Knob) 
Harrison County 

(Cynthiana) 
Hanson 
Harlan 
Harrodsburg 
Hartford 
Hawesville 
Hazard 
Hazel 
Hazel Green 

(East Bemstadt) 
Hazel Green Academy 
Heath 

(Paducah) 
Hellier 
Henderson 
Henderson County 

(Henderson) 
Henry Central 

(New Castle) 
Henry Clay 

(Lexington) 
Hickman County 

(Clinton) 
Highlands 

(Ft. Thomas) 
High Street 

(Bowling Green) 
Hindman 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 



Hiseville 
Hitchins 
Holmes 

(Covington) 
Holy Cross 

(Covington) 
Holy Family 

(Ashland) 
Holy Name 

(Henderson) 
Hopkinsville 
Horse Branch 
rtowevalley 

(Cecilia) 
Hughes-Kirk 

(Beechmont) 
Hustonville 
Inez 
Irvine 
Irvington 
Jackson 
J. M. Atherton 
(Louisville) 
Jenkins 

Jessamine County 
(Nicholasville) 
Johns Creek 

(Pikeville) 
Junction City 
J. W. Million 

(Earlington) 
Kentucky Mill. Inst. 

(Lyndon) 
Ky. School for Blind 

(Louisville) 
Kingdom Come 

(Linefork) 
Kirksey 
Knott County 

(Pippa Passes) 
Knox Central 

(Barbourville) 
Lafayette 

(Lexington) 
Lancaster 
LaRue County 

(Hodgenville) 
Leatherwood 
(Slemp) 
Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 
Lee County 

(Beattyville) 
Leitchfield 
Leslie County 

(Hyden) 
Letcher 
Lewisburg 
Lewisport 
Lexington Catholic 
Liberty 
Lily 
Lincoln Grant 

(Covington) 
Lincoln 

(Franklin) 
Lincoln 

(Middlesoro) 
Lincoln Institute 
(Lincoln Ridge) 



Livermore 
Livingston 
Livingston Central 

(Bui-na) 
Lloyd Memorial 

(Erlanger) 
London 
Lone Jack 

(Four Mile) 
Louisa 

Louisville Country Day 
Lowes 
Loyall 
Ludlow 
Lvnn Camp 

(Corbin) 
Lynn Grove 
Lynnvale 

(White Mills) 
Lyon County 

(Kuttawa) 
McDowell 
McKell 

(South Shore) 
McKinney 
Madison Central 
(Richmond) 
Madison-Model 

(Richmond) 
Madisonville 
Magoffin Bapt. Inst. 

(Mountain Valley) 
Male 

(Louisville) 
Marrowbone 
Martin 
Mason 

(Lancaster) 
Mayfield 
May's Lick 
Maysville 
Maytown 

(Langley) 

M. C. Napier 

(Hazard) 

Meade County 

(Brandenburg) 
Meade Memorial 

(Williamsport) 
Memorial 

(Hardyville) 
Memorial 

(Waynesburg) 
Mercer County 

( Harrodsburg) 
Metcalfe County 
(Edmonton) 
Middleburg 
Middlesboro 
Midway 

Millersburg Mill. Inst. 
Minerva 
Montgomery County 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Monticello 
Morgan County 

(West Liberty) 
Morganfield 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vernon 



Mt. Washington 
Muhlenberg Central 

(Powderly) 
Mullins 

(Pikeville) 
Munfordville 
Murray 
Nancy 
Nebo 

New Concord 
Newport 

Newport Catholic 
Nortn Marshall 

(Calvert City) 
North Middletown 
North Warren 

(Smiths Grove) 
Oldham County 
(LaGrange) 
Old Ky. Home 

(Bardstown) 
Olive Hill 
Olmstead 
Oneida Institute 
Orangeburg 

(Maysville) 
Owen County 

(Owenton) 
Owensboro 
Owensboro Catholic 
Owingsville 
Owsley County 

(Booneville) 
Paducah Tilghman 
Paint Lick 
Paintsville 
Paris 
Paris Western 

(Paris) 
Park City 
Parksville 
Pendleton 

(Falmouth) 
P. L. Dunbar 

(Lexington) 
Perryville 
Phelps 
Pikeville 
Pine Knot 
Pineville 
Pleasant View 
Plsasure Ridge Park 
Powell County 
(Stanton) 
Prestonsburg 
Prichard 

(Grayson) 
Providene 
Pulaski County 
( Somerset) 
Race! and 
Red Bird 

( Beverly) 
Reidland 

(Paducah) 
Richardsville 
Rineyville 
Riverview 

(Hickman) 
Rockhold 



Rosenwald 

(Barbourville) 
Rosenwald 

(Harlan) 
Rosenwald 

(Lebanon) 
Rosenwald 

(Madisonville) 
Rosen wald-Dunbar 
(Nicholasville) 
Rowan County 

(Morehead) 
Russell 
Russell County 

(Russell Springs) 
Russellville 
Sacramento 
St. Agatha Acad. 
(Winchester) 
St. Agnes 

(Uniontown) 
St. Aloysius 

(Shepherdsville) 
St. Augustine 

(Lebanon) 
St. Camillus Academy 

(Corbin) 
St. Charles 

(Lebanon) 
St. Francis 

(Loretto) 
St. Henry 

(Erlanger) 
St. John 

(Paducah) 
St. Joseph Prep. 
(Bardstown) 
St. Thomas 

(Ft. Thomas) 
St. Xavier 

(Louisville) 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 
Scott County 

(Georgetown) 
Scobtsville 
Seneca 

(Louisville) 
Sharpsburg 
Shawnee 

(Louisville) 
Shelbyville 
Shepherdsville 
Shopville 
Silver Grove 
Simmons 

(Versailles) 
Simon Kenton 

(Independence) 
Simpsonville 
Somerset 
Sonora 
Southern 

(Louisville) 
South Marshall 

(Benton) 
South Portsmouth 
Springfield 
Stanford 
Sturgis 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 



Page Seven 



Symsonia 
Taylor County 

(Campbellsville) 
Taylorsville 
Temple Hill 

(Glasgow) 
Todd County 

(Elkton) 
Tollesboro 
Trigg- County 

(Cadiz) 
Tyner 
University 

(Lexington) 
Valley 

(Valley Station) 
Vanceburg-Lewis County 

(Vanceburg) 
Van Lear 
Versailles 
Vine Grove 
Virgie 
Waddy 
Waggener 

(Louisville) 



Walton-Verona 

(Walton) 
Wallins 

(Wallins Creek) 
Warren County 

(Bovifling Green) 

Wayland 
Wayne County 

(Monticello) 
Western 

(Owensboro) 
Western 

(Sinai) 
West Main Street 

(Lynch) 
Wheelwright 
Whitesburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamstown 
Willisburg 
Winchester 
Wingo 
Wurtland 



National Federation Annual 
Meeting 

(Continued from September Issue of the ATHLETE) 
The Joint Baseball Committee participated in a 
breakfast meeting- on Tuesday, June 30. Those pres- 
ent were T. A. SANFORD (Kentucky), Chairman; 
H. M.. EMSWILER (Ohio); W. R. PUGITT (West 
Virginia); L. V. PHILLIPS (Indiana); ALBERT 
WILLIS (Illinois); and CLIFFORD B. FAGAN, 
National Federation Executive Secretary. Topics 
of mutual interest were discussed and there was 
agreement that the current program as sponsored 
by the Joint Committee is working satisfactorily. 
A report and accompanying- communication from 
the President of the National Association of Pro- 
fessional Baseball Leagues announcing disciplinary 
action taken agaiast a professional club which had 
violated the agreement were reviewed. The penalty 
for the violation of the agreement was assessed as 
provided by the agreement and the Committee com- 
mended the President of the Association for his 
action. The Committee also received a commvmica- 
tioin from the Commissioner's office, asking for its 
interpretation of the application of the agreement 
to a boy who had rendered himself ineligible in a 
state due to his becoming married. The Committee 
concurred with the Comissioner's intei-pretation 
that such boy was not eligible to sign a professional 
league contract until he had become too old for 
interscholastic athletics or he had completed the 
number of semesters at the schools in which he 
could be eligible for interscholastic athletics or his 
class had graduated. The Baseball Summary, pre- 
pared for distribution when the Committee made its 
report at the General Athletic meetings, was re- 
viewed. Chairman T. A. SANFORD (Kentucky) and 
Committee Member L. V. PHILLIPS (Indiana) were 
authorized to make the report on the Committee's 
behalf. 

An election for Executive Committee Members 
for Sections 1, 5 and 6 resulted in the re-election of 
W. R. FUGITT (West Virginia) for Section 1; the 
election of GROVER C. KOFFMAN (Louisiana) for 



Section 5; and of HINEY P. LUND (Montana) for 
Section 6. At the Thursday meeting of the Execu- 
tive Committee, HERMAN F. KELLER (Indiana) 
was elected President of the National Federation 
and C. E. WETMORE (Wisconsin) was elected Vice- 
President. 

At the business session of the National Council a 
Committee, representing several State Associations, 
introduced the following proposal to be recom- 
mended to the Collegiate Associations as an 
AMENDMENT to the present Collegiate All-Star 
regulation. 

"Be it hereby resolved that any interscholastic 
player, who during the previous school year was a 
member of a high school team, shall be ineligible 
for intercollegiate competition in athletics if he has 
participated in an All-Star game not sanctioned 
by his State High School Athletic Association. 

"Be it further resolved that the National Fed- 
eration's Executive Committee request each State 
High School Association Executive Officei- to urge 
colleges in his state to support the amendment. 

"Be it further resolved that the amendment not 
apply to amy player for participation in an All-Star 
contest prior to September 1, 1959. 

"Be it further resolved that the National Federa- 
tion Executive Committee or its Executive Repre- 
sentative request the National Association of Inter- 
collegiate Athletics and the National Junior College 
Athletic Association to adopt the present college 
All-Star regulation and the amendment. 

"And be it further resolved that a copy of the 
regulation and the amendment be sent to all mem- 
bers of the Executive Committees of the National 
Collegiate Athletic Associatioin, the National As- 
sociation for Intercollegiate Athletics and the Na- 
tional Junior College Athletic Association." 

After a study of the resolution and a thorough 
consideration of all the problems involved, it was 
adopted by a vote of 25 to 9. 

The National Council adopted, by a 25 to 1 ma- 
jority, a RESOLUTION expressing its disapproval 
of the All-Star features of the Babe Ruth League 
tournament play and further resolved that the 
Boards of Control of each State Association amd 
the administrative Secretary of the Babe Ruth 
League, Inc. be notified of this action. 

RESOLUTIONS expressing appreciation to the 
Tennessee Board of Control, the Tennessee Legis- 
lative Council, the Tennessee Executive Officers, and 
Messrs. Bridges and Porter were unanimously 
adopted. Mrs. Grider, Mrs. Jennings, and Mrs. 
Traube were voted the great appreciation of the 
Federation Council members for their services as 
registrants and for the many courtesies they ex- 
tended to people enrolling at the convention. 



LIST OF CORRECTIONS 
1959 FOOTBALL RULES PUBLICATIONS 

Case Book 

1. P.S. 21: Last sentence might not be correct 
if ball had been snapped between B's 25 and their 
goal line. 

2. P.S. 124D: In 5th line after comma, insert "or 
Captain of Team A requests time-out for a desig- 
nated injured player. 

3. P.S. 267: Ruling in (a) should be 1st for A on 
B's 12-1/2. (Half the distance from B's 25). 

4. Question 4, p. 57: Only 4 is correct statement. 
5. P.S. 304B: Penalty in (a) is automatically 

accepted. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 



6. P.S. 307: The new try is from B's 2 yardline. 

7. P.S. 445: In (a) penalty is automatically de- 
clined, but if Captain should insist on enforcement, 
it would still be a touchdown as explained. 

Player Handbook 

1. Page 3, Fundamental No. 11: The period must 
be extended. 

2. Page 10, 3-5-1 and 3-7-1: "Referee's time-out" 
is now "Official's time-out." "Excess time-out" is 
no longer possible. 

3. Page 21, last play on page: Flying tackle is 
no longer illegal. 

4. Page 32: Third and second sentence from last 
sentence of the first paragraph of the "Comment" 
are not in line with current rule regarding interior 
linemen. 

5. Page 32, last two plays on page: Ruling would 
depend on meaning of "position." If tackle Al has 
one or both hands on or near the ground, it is a 
false start. 

6. Page 34, second play from bottom: Penalty for 
defensive holding is 15 yards. 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

Ruling: A will doubtlessly decline the penalty in 
either (a) or (b) and take the touchback. If the 
penalty is accepted it will be 1st and 10 for A on 
its 18. 

39. Play: 1st and 10 on A's 12. Fumble by Al 
is almost at rest on his 4 yardline. During an at- 
tempt to recover the ball, A2 pushes Bl into the 
ball which forces it across the goal line where it 
is recovered by: (a) A3 who is downed there; or 
(b) A4 who advances to A's 15; or (c) B2. 

Ruling: A2 forced the ball across his his goal 
line when he pushed Bl into it. Safety in (a) and 
touchdown in (c). In (b), it is A's ball on the 15 
and the next down is 2nd and 7. 

40. Play: The score is A 14 - B 6 with one minute 
left to play. Team A has the ball on their own 2 
yardline. Al, who intends to kick, muffs the snap 
in the end zone and then throws a forward pass 
which is muffed by ineligible A2 on the line of 
scrimmage. The muff is intercepted by Bl, who 
carries it into the end zone. After Bl is in the end 
zone B2 clips. Captain of Team B desires to accept 
the penalty for the illegal forward pass. 

Ruling: Under ordinary circumstances, the pen- 
alty for the illegal foi-ward pass will be automatic- 
ally declined, the touchdown will count and the pen- 
alty for B's clip (a dead ball foul after the touch- 
down) will be enforced at the succeeding kick-off. 
However, as is aways their prerogative, B may ac- 
cept the penaty. If Team B accepts the penaty, 
there is a double foul because the foul by B (clip- 
ping) will have occurred before B has accepted the 
penalty for A's illegal pass. A double foul will re- 
quire replaying the down. 

41. Play: The score is A 13 - B 12. Both Team B 
touchdowns have been scored by punt returns. A 
punt by Team A is in the air as time for the fourth 
quarter expires. Team A commits fair catch inter- 
ference by: (a) catching the kick in flight beyond 
the expanded neutral zone; or (b) preventing Bl 
from catching it. 



Ruling: The game is over when the ball becomes 
dead. The fouls in both (a) and (b) have been by 
the Offense and, therefore, the fourth period can- 
not be extended by an untimed down. 

42. Play: Al, running near and parallel to the 
sideline, inadvertently steps on it after which he 
returns inbounds and catches a forward pass. 

Ruling: Al has been out-of-bounds voluntarily. 
Comment: It is the responsibility of the players 
to know the location of the boundary lines. 

43. Play: A team charged with four time-outs in 
a half requests a time-out for injured Al. May A2 
or Bl confer with his coach at the sideline? 

Ruling: This will be an Official's time-out. Since 
the time-out is going to be charged to the Official, 
it is not legal for either team to confer with his 
coach. 

44. Play: Kick by Kl is first touched by K2 
after which it is muffed by Rl and rebounds behind 
the line where Kl recovers and advances for a 
touchdown. K3 was offside. After the touchdown: 

(a) K; or (b) R commits a personal foul. 
Ruling: Penalty for the offside by K3 is con- 
sidered automatically declined to permit A to take 
the ball at spot of first touching. In both (a) and 

(b) the penalty for the personal foul is enfoi'ced 
after awarding the ball to R. After measurement 
for the personal foul it will be R's ball and in (a), 
1st and 10 and in (b) 1st and 25. 

45. Play: After ball is ready-for-play, offensive 
tackle takes 3-point stance inadvertently in neutral 
zone. He moves slowly back to be legally on the line. 
Is this a false start if B: (a) is; or (b) is not drawn 
into the neutral zone? 

Ruling: Not an infraction of the rule concerning 
interior linemen. It might be a false start for other 
reasons but if the tackle's obvious purpose is merely 
to move to a correct position, it will be considered 
legal action. 

46. Play: 3rd and 7 on B's 15. A2 is offside dur- 
ing the down in which Al advances for a touchdown. 
After Al is across the goal line, B2 plies on. 

Ruling: Penalty for offside by A2 is automatic- 
ally accepted and the distance is measured, placing 
the ball on A's 20 yardline. Then the penalty for 
the foul by B2 (one-half the distance to the goal) 
is enforced. It is 3rd and 2 for A on A's 10 yard- 
line after the enforcement. 

47. Play: 2nd down. Punt by Kl is touched by E 
beyond the neutral zone expanded, after which it 
rebounds behind the line where it is recovered by 
K2. K2 chooses to attempt to advance by means of 
a legal forward pass. The pass is incomplete. 

Ruling: Touching of punt by Rl beyond neutral 
zone expanded ends series of downs. It is a new 
series for K, 1st and 10 at the previous spot. 

48. Play: After a fair catch in the right side 
zone on his 40, R, because of the wind, elects to: 
(a) free kick; or (b) snap from the left inbounds 
mark. 

Ruling: In either (a) or (b) the ball may be put 
in play on the proper yardline anywhere between 
the inbounds lines. 

49. Play: When and where will the National 
Federation Football Committee meet in 1960? 

Ruling: At the Claypool Hotel in Indianapolis, 
Indiana, Monday and Tuesday, January 4 and 5. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 



Page Nine 



The Flying Dutchman 

Eig'hteen years ago, about this same time of the 
year, the Dutchman was loading the car for his first 
trip over Kentucky conducting- baslvetball clinics for 
the K.H.S.A.A. Since 1942 approximately 35,000 
miles have been put on two Chevys and three Pon- 
tiacs working with Kentucky's basketball officials. 
And it has all been a wonderful experience. 

All of you fellows in the age bracket of Russ 
Williamson, Jack Dawson, Louie Litchfield, "Johnie" 
Crowdus and Methuselah will recall that 1942 was 
a gasoline rationing- year. When we started out 
there were only enough gas coupons to cover one 
hundred fifty miles. Commissioner Ted, in his Hen- 
derson office, never expected the Dutchman to cover 
the 1900 mile trip. When that 1939 Chevy coasted 
in to Barret High for the last clinic the completion 
was a tribute to the co-opera;tive genius of Ken- 
tuckians. The car was pushed, carried in a transfer 
truck and towed. In Ashland, the police did not help 
by towing it in for parking all night in an area 
where the streets were being cleaned. 

1942 saw 96 coaches, officials and players turn 
out. It is a safe guess that 1959 will see over 2,000. 
The same year saw hair on the heads of Ernie 
Chattin, Rex Alexander and Ellis Johnson; this year 
will see none. Earle Jones staged the clinic in the 
Maysville jail in 1942; 1959 finds our trusty officials 
paroled to Lexington. There have been a lot of 
changes, lots of wonderful memories, many endur- 
ing friendships and a wonderful improvement in 
the sportsmanship of coaches and crowds, causing 
Kentucky to be regarded as "The Sportsmanship 
Capitol of the Nation." 

This past spring the Dutchman sat on the Na- 
tional Basketball Rules Committee, helping write 
the rules. That august body has instructed all of 
the nation's interpreters to emphasize four things: 
(1) Sportsmanship, (2) Proper tossing of jump 
balls, (3) Administering the running rule, and (4) 
Legally blocking goals for which so many times 
players are penalized. Of these four, sportsmanship 
takes precedence. 

ALL COACHES AND OFFICIALS TAKE HEED 
OF THE FOLLOWING: Coaches will be expected 
not only to set good examples on the bench but will 
not converse directly with officials on the playing 
floor. Any official conversing with a coach on the 
floor, except in cases of emergency, will be guilty 
of violation of procedure adopted by Kentucky's 
basketball officials. At the state-wide meeting of 
the officials representing the sixteen regions How- 
ard Gardner moved to this effect, Briscoe Inman 
seconded, and the group voted unanimously in favor 
of the motion. 

Excei-pts from an article by Cliff Fagan, Execu- 
tive Secretary of the National Federation of High 
School Athletic Associations, stress sportsmanship. 
These are from Fagan's "A Job To Do": "Good 
sportsmanship is the 'most noble' of all interscholas- 
tic program objectives. . . . Unfortunately, wrong 
attitudes are just as easy to acquire if the contests 
are allowed to degenerate to demonstrations of poor 
sportsmanship. . . . Good sportsmanship is not a 
complicated attitude. ... It simply means playing 



the game according to the spirit as well as the 
letter of the rule." 

The K.H.S.A.A. has long been placing emphasis 
on sportsmanship. That is what the Abou Ben Adhem 
Awards are for. Let the Dutchman know when a 
community does something outstanding so recogni- 
tion can be made. The Indiana High School Athletic 
Association places large signs in Butler Field House 
at each State Basketball Tournament emphasizing 
sportsmanship. One we remember reads "Good 
Sportsmanship will always win, whether your team 
is out or in." 

The Dutchman's gratitude and the appreciation 
of all Kentuckians are due the hundreds of Ken- 
tucky's coaches who helped make a study of recrea- 
tion in all of our counties for President Eisenhower's 
White House House Conference. Your surveys were 
accurate and revealing, and should bring recrea- 
tional progress to the Commonwealth. Your studies 
revealed that the lack of recreation programs in our 
state is appalling, but what is more important you 
indicated that the people wanted something done 
for Kentucky's boys and girls in the field of recrea- 
tion. 

According to countless questionnaires returned by 
Kentucky's coaches and physical educators, the 
thing most needed recreationally in order of import- 
ance are: (1) Year-round recreation programs with 
trained directors, (2) The use of school buildings 
and grounds when not in use educationally, (3) A 
solution to the problem of finance, (4) Development 
of facilities, (5) Adults to take the lead, (6) Activ- 
ities for girls, and (7) Co-ordination of many activ- 
ities which have sprung up "like Topsy." Relative 
to No. 3, the solution should be simple with Referee 
George Conley in the State Senate. 

Anything can happen in Kentucky. This is in 
evidence when on the first play of the first football 
game of the season in Louisville a football official 
and a player suffered broken legs at the same time 
when they were simultaneously clipped. They were 
both bedded down in the same room in the same 
hospital. 

This occurred in one of our state high school 
games. A penalty was called and the referee stepped 
off fifteen yards, signaling back-field in motion. 
The protesting coach said, "Ref, that's only a five 
yard penalty." "So it is," said the Referee, "but 
there were three men in motion in your backfield." 
"Gee, why did this have to happen to me," moaned 
the coach. 

Football is progressing. With the determination of 
state champions a great impetus has been given to 
the game by the K.H.S.A.A. Edgar McNabb, "the 
granddaddy of all officials from football and basket- 
ball to hop-scotch," has given high school football 
another push foi-ward with his football clinics for 
coaches and officials. If you want good sports it 
naturally follows that there must be good officiat- 
ing. Because "Big, Good-natured Mac" is contribut- 
ing so much he is the unanimous choice to receive 
the Coni Cob Pipe Award for October. It could not 
happen to a nicer guy. 

Send your news, recommendations for awards, 
your compliments and criticisms to The Flying 
Dutchman, Suite 1-5 Armory Buildings, Louisville 
2, Kentucky. 



Page Ten THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 

Report of Insurance Claims 

(Continued from the September Issue of The Kentucky High School Athlete) 

Paducah Tilghman Louis Igert Knee injury (special) 100 00 

Paducah Tilghman Bobby Jones Chipped teeth, X-ray __ 222'' 700 

Paducah Tilghman Lynn Jones X-ray I"" ~ g^oO 

Paducah Tilghman Freddie Lookofsky X-ray _ _ _I fi'oo 

Paducah Tilghman John Mutchler X-ray I-I-II— II_-_IIII^_ lo!oO 

Paducah Tilghman John Mutchler X-ray ~" lo!oo 

Paducah Tilghman Kobbie Robertson Laceration - suture II" II 5*00 

Paducah Tilghman Dickie Robison Dislocated shoulder _ ~I 20 00 

Paducah Tilghman S. W. Stamper X-ray IIII_IIIIII. 6".00 

Paducah Tilghman Mike Sticher Uislocated shoulder "I" lo'oo 

Paducah Tilghman Mike Sticher X-ray __ II""' _I lo'oo 

Paducah Tilghman Mike Sticher Broken tooth, X-ray„_ ___ __ " _ 30 50 

Paducah Tilghman Craig Stubblefield X-ray IIIIII lo!oo 

Paducah Tilghman Gary Stubblefield Laceration - suture II 5.00 

Paducah Tilghman Terry Thomas X-ray 6,0I) 

Paducah Tilghman Charles B. Vaughn Head injury (special) 36.00 

Paint Lick Ray Hammonds X-ray 6.00 

Paint Lick Larry Ray Laceration - suture 5.00 

Paintsville Joe Brown Broken nose. X-ray 4o!oO 

Paintsville Roy Conley X-ray I 12.00 

Paintsville Pat Hensley Elbow injury (special) 58.50 

Paintsville Pat Hensley Fractured humerus 33.00 

Paintsville Pat Hensley X-ray 12.00 

Paintsville Mike Minix Back injury (special) 19.00 

Paintsville Ronnie Walke Kidney injury (special) 24.50 

Paris Benny Fugate Fractured metacarpal 11.00 

Park City David Cutliff Elbow injury (special) 15,00 

Park City William Houchens Broken wrist. X-ray _ _ 32 00 

Park City Glendell Moore X-ray II-_II 12.00 

Perryville Gary Bricken Loss of teeth _ 60.00 

Pineville Wayne Elliott X-ray _ _ 10 00 

Pineville Clarence Ikerd Fractured fibula 60.00 

Pineville Donnie Broughton Broken tooth 5 00 

Pineville Carl Culton X-ray 6.00 

Pineville Michael Gilbert Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Pineville Donald Hampton Broken teeth 40.00 

Pineville Alfred Wombles Laceration - suture 5.00 

Poplar Creek James E. Young Foot injury (special) 27.00 

Prestonsburg Paul D. Dempsey Shoulder injury (special) 196.38 

Prestonsburg Curtis Holbrook X-ray 10.00 

Prestonsburg Bobby Howell X-ray 10.00 

Prestonsburg Henry Hughes X-ray 20.00 

Prestonsburg Henry Hughes X-ray 20.00 

Prestonsburg Eddie Leslie Dislocated knee 35.00 

Prestonsburg Douglas McPeak X-ray 10.00 

Prestonsburg Paul R. Minix X-ray 10.00 

Prestonsburg Kelly Moore Laceration - suture 6.00 

Prestonsburg Bobby Pearson X-ray 10.00 

Prestonsburg Dennis Stephens X-ray 10.00 

Providence Roy Joe Head Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Providence Paul McDowell Dislocated shoulder 36.00 

Red Bird Raymond Meredith Broken tooth 25.00 

Rineyville Michael Cockrell Dental injury (special) 41.50 

Rineyville William Wise Foot injury (special) 57.50 

Rockhold Walter Cooper Broken nose 16.00 

Rockhold Darrell Mink Fractured tarsal. X-ray 30.00 

Rosenwald Elmer Barnes Broken finger. X-ray 15.00 

Rosenwald George Tyra Knee injury (special) 68.20 

Russell Gary Boyd Broken tooth 15.00 

Russell Bob Bradford Laceration - suture 5.00 

Russell John Duncan Dental injury (special) 31.00 

Russell John Duncan Broken tooth 8.00 

Russell C. H. Snedegar Fractured fibula (special! 55.00 

Russell Jack Webb Fractured radius 40.00 

Russell County Wendell B. Coffey Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Russellville Dick Bagley X-ray 10.00 

Russellville Charles Lewis X-ray 6.00 

Russellville Lawrence Monroe Elbow injury (special) 39.00 

Russellville Gaither Taylor Fractured humerus 75.00 

St. Charles Francis Mattingly Fractured and dislocated ankle 50.00 

St. Charles Spalding White Broken finger. X-ray ^^ 16.00 

St. Charles Spalding White Broken thumb. X-ray 16.00 

St. Francis Joseph Luckett X-ray 9.00 

St. Thomas Tim Rixson Broken nose 16.00 

Seneca John W. Abbott Broken thumb. X-ray 20.00 

Seneca Bill Bischof Fractured patella 50.00 

Seneca Armand Boucher Nose injury (special) 37.00 

Seneca Charles Buckner X-ray 6.00 

Seneca Russell Carpenter, Jr Knee injury (special) 38.0C 

Seneca John Carpenter X-ray 10.00 

Seneca Bill Dubourg Arm injury (special) 27.50 

Seneca Jim Goolsby X-ray ^ 20.00 

Seneca Lee Horan X-ray 10.00 

Seneca Nickie Karem Foot injury (special) 16.39 

Seneca Nickie Karem Laceration - suture 5.00 

Seneca Forrest Lahman X-ray 5.00 

Seneca John Larmee Nose injury (special) 91.60 

Seneca Edward Pape, Jr X-ray 10.00 

Seneca Jack P. Powell, Jr Fractured tarsal 20.00 

Seneca Robert Watson Fractured radius and ulna 76.00 



I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 Page Eleven 

Shelbyville Charles M. Blakemore Broken Clavicle 35.00 

Shelbyville Carroll R. Brown X-ray 12.00 

Shelbyville Hugh Brown X-ray 15.00 

Shelbyville Mike Cheak X-ray 10.00 

Shelbyville Bob Cottongim X-ray 12.00 

Shelbyville Victor Fallis X-ray 12.00 

Shelbyville Victor Fallis X-ray 12.00 

Shelbyville Jerry Gordon X-ray 12.00 

Shelbyville Roger Green X-ray 12.00 

Shelbyville Elmo C. Head. Jr Laceration - suture 5.00 

Shelbyville James Landers X-ray 10.00 

Shelbyville Ralph Mitchell Lee injury (special) 500.00 

Shelbyville Mike Saunders X-ray 7.50 

Shelbyville Morty Webb Shoulder injury (special! 27.00 

Shelbyville Jimmy Yount X-ray 16.00 

Shelbyville Ronnie Yount Laceration - suture 5.00 

Shepherdsville Sammie Bain X-ray 6.00 

Shepherdsville Daryl Lee Fractured ulna 39.00 

Shepherdsville Bennie McDonald Dislocated wrist, X-ray 25.00 

Shepherdsville Ronnie Parker X-ray 6.00 

Shepherdsville Charles Roehrig Fractured humerus 50.00 

Shopville William K. Stewart Fractured tibia 50.00 

Simpsonville Nick Phillips Loss of tooth 20.00 

Simpsonville B'lly B. Sweeney Broken tooth 20.00 

Sinking Fork Charles Hancock Broken finger. X-ray 12.00 

Sinking Fork .loda Turner Nose injury (special) 49.50 

Slaughters Don Boles X-ray 10.00 

Slaughters G. L. Chandler X-ray 6.00 

Somerset Richard Allen Fractured fibula 47.50 

Somerset Cornelius Coffee Dislocated hip 23.00 

Somerset T. J. Criswell Fractured radius 24.00 

Somerset Elroy Edwards Loss of tooth 3.00 

Somerset Clyde Elinor Fractured jaw 25.00 

Somerset Jack G^rdler Back injury (special) 30.08 

Somerset .Tack Girdler _ X-ray 20.00 

Somerset J. F. Hines Dislocated knee 10.00 

Somerset J. W. Hines X-ray 6.00 

Somerset David Isabell Broken toe 10.00 

Somerset Walter Maquire Fractured clavicle 29.00 

Somerset Tommy Reesor X-ray 5.00 

Somerset Bob Waddle Dislocated hip 20.00 

Southern James Brown X-ray 6"00 

Southern Jack Carter X-ray 10.00 

Southern Larry Cowles X-ray 6.00 

Southern William Deloh Laceration - suture 5.00 

Southern Kenneth Gribbins Broken tooth 11.00 

Southern Lynn Griffin Dental injury (special) 80.00 

Southern David Harralson Fractured metacarpal, X-ray 32.00 

Southern Leon Howell Laceration - suture 5.00 

Southern Gary James Dental injury (special) 97.00 

Southern Steve Jones X-ray 7.50 

Southern David Lambert X-ray 7.00 

Southern George Stuckenburg X-ray 13.00 

Southern Don Warren X-ray 12.00 

Springfield David Cornish Fractured radius 37.25 

Springfield Terry L. Curtis X-ray 12.00 

Springfield James W. Grider X-ray 10.00 

Springfield Freddy Smith Broken rib. X-ray 16.00 

Stanford Randall Floyd X-ray 10.00 

Stanford Wayne Noland X-ray 5.00 

Stanford Robert Short Fractured clavicle 20.00 

Stanford Gerald Staggs Broken tooth 18.00 

Sunfish Louis Logsdon Loss of tooth. X-ray 29.00 

Taylor County Tommie Brown Broken nose. X-ray 26.00 

Taylor County Allen Murley Laceration - suture 4.00 

Temple Hill Bob Driver X-ray 6.00 

Temple Hill David Underwood Broken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

Todd County Lewis T. Seay X-ray 6.00 

Todd County Paul Shemwell X-ray 12.00 

Todd County Billy Simpson X-ray 12.00 

Tollesboro Davis Breeze Laceration - suture 5.00 

Tollesboro Russell Hord X-ray 6.00 

Tollesboro Carl D. Stanfield Laceration - suture 5.00 

Tompkinsville Veachel Harlan Fractured tibia 35,50 

Tompkinsvillc Douglass McPherson Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Tompkinsville Joe Petett X-ray 6.00 

Tompkinsville Alfred Turner Broken wrist 35.00 

Trigg County John Vinson Dental injury (special) 35.00 

Tyner Larry House X-ray 5.00 

Tyner Re.x King X-ray 6,00 

Utica E. L. Chapman Jaw injury (special) 50.00 

Utica D. J. Krahwinkel Ankle injury (special) 22.50 

Utica Norman Payton Laceration - suture 5.00 

Valley David Alexander X-ray 6.00 

Valley Emmett Beams Broken nose, X-ray 30.00 

Valley Tonv Carpenter X-ray 10.00 

Valley Bobby Clenney X-ray 10.00 

Valley .Toe Druga Laceration - suture 5.00 

Valley Bill Durbin X-ray 10.00 

Valley Frank Groves X-ray 10.00 

Valley Frank Groves X-ray 10.00 

Valley Virgil Hall Laceration - suture. X-ray 11.00 

Valley Russell Mabrey X-ray 6.00 

Valley Ernest Norton Nose injury (snecial) 25.00 

Valley Jerry Royse Broken rib. X-ray 20.00 

Valley Ronnie Sandefur X-ray 16.00 

Valley Randel Sharp X-ray 10.00 

Valley James Shofner Broken nose. X-ray 40.00 

Valley Robert Smith X-ray 6.00 



Page Twelve THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1959 

Valley Doug Taylor X-ray g.OO 

Valley Randall Walker X-ray 20.00 

Valley Bill Wall Nose injury (special) 134.15 

Valley Larry White X-ray 2 10.00 

Valley Larry White Broken finger. X-ray 16.00 

Valley Kenneth Wrotham Laceration - suture 5.00 

Valley Charles Young X-ray 10.00 

Versailles David Lafoe Leg injury (special) 172.35 

Versailles R- G. Penn Rib injury (special) _ 32.50 

Vine Grove Robert Barry X-ray 10.00 

Waggener John Abbott Fractured fibula 26.00 

Waggener Daryl Beck Dental injury (special) 50.00 

Waggener Gilbert C. Brunnhoefer Fractured metacarpal 17.60 

Waggener Steve Catlett X-ray 6.00 

Waggener Fred Davis Fractured fibula 50.00 

Waggener Fred Davis Laceration - suture 5,00 

Waggener Fred Davis Laceration - suture 5.00 

Waggener Dennis Garber X-ray 6.00 

Waggener Steve Griffin X-ray 12.00 

Waggener Robert Hackney Ankle injury (special) 79.05 

Waggener Howard Hatton X-ray 6.00 

Waggener Gordon Keal Laceration - suture 5.00 

Waggener Patrick Malone Elbow injury (special) 20.00 

Waggener Patrick Malone Elbow injury (special) 15.00 

Waggener Patrick Malone Foot injury (special) 53.25 

Waggener Willard Mayhan Leg injury (special) 25.00 

Waggener Bill Mayrose Dislocated knee 10.00 

Waggener Thomas Morgan Shoulder injury (special) 41.00 

Waggener Frederick Neikirk Ear injury (special) 17.75 

Waggener Sam Pollitt Laceration - suture 5.00 

Waggener Raymey Simpson Ankle injury (special) 21.25 

Waggener David Steffen Leg injury (special) 35.28 

Waggener David Sutuzenberger Fractured carpal, X-ray 32.00 

Waggener Warren VanHoose Head injury (special) 10.00 

Waggener Howard Watson Ankle injury (special) 16.00 

Waggener Russell Weikel Dental injury (special) 173.60 

Waggener Eric Wurmser X-ray 12.00 

Wallins Truman Blanton Fractured clavicle 13.00 

Wallins Richard Creech Dislocated shoulder 16.00 

Wallins Ralph Felosi X-ray 12.00 

Wallins James E. Johnson Laceration - suture. X-ray 15.00 

Wallins John A. Johnson X-ray 12.00 

Wallins John Kirkland Fractured metatarsals 30.00 

Walton-Verona David Afterkirk X-ray 6.00 

Walton-Verona Moreland D. Poore Fractured fibula 40.00 

Warfield Roy Franklin Allen X-ray — 10.00 

Warfield Wendell F. Moore X-ray 10.00 

Warren County Edgar Carlyle Knee injury (special) 17.50 

Wayland Gary Branham Broken nose 15.00 

Wayne County Dale Gregory X-ray 6.00 

Wayne County Hugh G. Ramsey X-ray 10.00 

West Main Henry T. Mason Dislocated thumb, X-i-ay 12.50 

Wheelwright Roger Baker Laceration - suture 5.00 

Wheelwright Darrel Bates Loss of teeth 20.00 

Wheelwright Jimmie Blevins X-ray 8.00 

Whitesburg Carter B. Bradshaw, Jr X-ray 10.00 

Whitesburg Chad Back Broken toe. X-ray 21.00 

Whitesburg Bobby Banks Fractured metacarpals. X-ray 36.00 

Whitesburg Gary Kincer X-ray 6.00 

Whitesburg Owen Pace Laceration - suture 5.00 

Whitesburg Clifford Sparks Broken teeth 50.00 

Whitesburg Wendel Sparks Broken teeth 12.00 

Williamsburg Phil Brennewstuhl Broken teeth 40.00 

Williamsburg Ralph Hopkins X-ray 10.00 

Williamsburg Palmer Hummel Dental injury (special) 74.00 

Williamsburg Richard Magee Fractured tibia 50.00 

Williamsburg Kenny R. Nighbert X-ray 20.00 

Williamsburg Elmer Patrick Dental injury (special) 71.00 

Williamstown Ray Di.xon X-ray 6.00 

Williamstown Wilfred Martin Loss of teeth 50.00 

Williamstown Michael Stanley Laceration - suture 5.00 

Williamstown Jefferson Webb Laceration - suture 5.00 

Williamstown James Williams Fractured metacarpal 14.00 

Willisburg Jackie Robinson Broken teeth 16.00 

Winchester Purcell Brooks X-ray 4.00 

Winchester John Chenault X-ray 6.00 

Winchester Waller Cooper X-ray 6.00 

Winchester Paul Francis X-ray 6.00 

Winchester Troy Gibson Fractured fibula I II 29^00 

Winchester Bonnie Glasscock Broken finger 15.00 

Winchester Billy Mitchell Laceration - suture 5.00 

Winchester John Phelps X-ray : 5.00 

Winchester Carl Puckett X-ray 6.00 

Winchester Carl Puckett Laceration - suture III__"_ I__I 5.00 

Winchester John Schworn Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Winchester Carroll Singleton X-ray lO.Ofl 

Wingo Dan McClain Ankle injury (special) 26.60 

Wurtland Richard Baker X-ray lO.OO 

Wurtland Jimmy Gumbert Rib injury (special) _ __ _ " 1500 

Wurtland Gary Holt X-ray __ 12 00 

Wurtland Curtis Hutchinson Fractured radius and ulna— _^ 75.00 

Wurtland Charlie Osborne Fractured clavicle 23.00 

Si,!"'. , ^- Norman Beck Leg injury (special) 15.00 

Official Charles M. Denton Leg injury (special) 16.50 

Official .John Weber X-ray 10.00 

Official Milford Wells Laceration - suture 11.00 



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Leather sleeve award jackets. Mixed wool knit trim. Select top grain 
leather sleeves in colors cream, oak, palomino, black, grey, white, royal and 
scarlet. Set-in pockets with contrasting color leather facings. Iridescent 
satin lining in body and sleeves. Easy action snap fasteners in athletic 
colors furnished regularly. 

HUNT'S Award Jackets are designed for campus and street wear — not 
for pre-game warm-up. Sized to finish 6 to 8 inches oversize. Average 
sleeve length 34". Average body length 25". Size 32 to 46 inclusive. 

STYLE 1911— LEATHER SET-IN SLEEVES 

Number 

19HW 24 oz. flannel, 100 Virgin Wool $20.75 

1911M 32 oz. Melton, 100% Wool, Colors: Navy, Maroon, 

Black, Dark Green 20.25 

1911NF Nylon Fleece 20.45 

STYLE 1912— LEATHER RAGLAN SLEEVES 

1912W 24 oz. flannel, 100% Virgin Wool 21.75 

1912M 32 oz. Melton, 100% Wool. Colors: Navy, Maroon, 

Black, Dark Green 21.45 

1912NF Nylon Fleece 22.45 

Extra length leather sleeves : 

Over 34", extra per inch .38 

Self material Bvron Collar .55 

Leather Byron Collar .95 

STYLE 1931— LEATHER ARMHOLE INSERT 

Set-in sleeves 
facings. Set-ir 
cent satin lir 
1931W 24 oz. 
1931M 32 oz. 

Black and 
193 INF Nylon Fleec 

STYLE 1935 



with contrasting colo 
pockets, snap fastene 
ng in both sleeves. 

flannel, 100% Vrgin Wool $15.25 

Melton, 100% wool. Colors : Navy, Maroon, 

and Dark Green 14.75 

Fleece 14.95 



-SELF MATERIAL SET-IN SLEEVES 

Solid color set-in slee 
facings. Snap fastene 
lining in body and sleeves. 

1935W 24 oz. flannel, 100% Virgin Wool $13.95 

1935R 24 oz. 100% Re-Processed Wool Flannel. Colors: 

Royal, Black, Navy and Dark Maroon 11.95 

1935T Skinner's Tackle Twill 12.75 

1935NF Nvlon Fleece^see color chart 13.45 

1935Y Rayon Satin 9.75 

STYLE 1936— SELF MATERIAL RAGLAND SLEEVES 

Solid color Raglan slet 
facings. Snap fastener 
lining in body and sleeves. 

1936W 24 oz. flannel 100% Virgin Wool 14.75 

1936R 24 oz. 100% Re-Processed Wool Flannel. Colors: 

Royal, Black, Navy and Dark Maroon 12.75 

1936T Skinner's Tackle Twill 13.45 

1936NF Nylon Fleece 14.25 

1936Y Rayon Satin 10.45 

Contrasting color sleeves: W-T-NF .75 

Y .45 



(Girls 



liable — signify by No. 



AWARD SWEATERS IN STOCK 

No. 26V — A 100% worsted and wool medium weight V neck pullover. All colors $12.70 

No. 28V — ^Medium weight V neck pullover by O'Shea 11.70 

No. HIJ — A 100% medium heavy worsted coat style button front 12.95 

No. 26J — Medium weight worsted and wool coat style button front sweater 14.25 

All standard athletic colors and all sizes for boys and girls available from stock in above sweaters. 
Please write for quotations on chenille letters and emblems for all above jackets and sweaters. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 



CH. 7-1941 



MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



CH. 7-1942 




Sntelif f e Has Th< 
SWEATERS! 

CLASS AND HONOR SWEATERS 

in Stock for Immediate Delivery 
With Lettering Service, lO-Da/ Delivery 




V-NECK SWEATERS 

No. 1030— A Sand Knitting Mills sweater of 100% wool 
in heavy baby shaker weave. Stock colors — Black, White, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Kelly, Old Gold, Cardinal; 
each $12.45 

No. 58V-W — Another Sand sweater in solid white. Choice 
of cheerleaders, bands, e+Cv Also very popular as athletic 
awards. White only; each\..._ $9.15 

No. 6V— 100% wool. Stock colors— Black, Old Gold, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Maroon, Kelly, Light Gold, 
Burnt Orange; each ...$9.75 



COAT SWEATERS 

No. 1020 — A Sand product of heavy baby shaker weave. 
100% pure wool yarn. Demanded by schools who want 
the best. Stock colors— Black, White, Royal, Scarlet, 
Purple, Cardinal, Kelly, Old Gold; each $13.65 

No. 530 J— A companion sweater to the 58-W. Made 
by Sand in solid white coat style in medium weight. 
Sizes 34 to 46. White only. Colors are special order. 
This sweater is very popular with cheerleaders and 
bands. Each ' $1 1.50 



No. 2620J — A Sand Knitting Mills Heavy Jersey Weave. 
Button Front Coat Sweater — 100% pure wool and one 
of our most popular honor garments. Stock colors — 
Royal, Kelly, Scarlet, Black, Old Gold, White, Maroon, 
Purple; each $10.65 



Reversible Honor Jackets 

Butwin Jackets ^■^'♦^ "^ ^°' °'" catalog with 

Special School Prices 

LETTERING: 6" chenille letters, each $1.35; 8" letters $2.05; chenille bars, 40c each; 
chenille chevrons, 45c; name plates, 15c each. Delivery of woven service stripes 
in sleeves cost 35c additional per sweater and requires three weeks for delivery. 



ALL PRICES OUOTED ARE WHOLESALE SCHOOL PRICES— NOT RETAIL PRICES. 




High School Afhkfe 

FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS WILL SOON BE DETERMINED 




Within the next few days the first K.H.S.A.A. Football Championships will be inaugurated. 
Increased attendance at regular season games in 1959 when regional standings were involved in- 
dicate that Kentucky football lovers approve of the play-offs. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

J, NOVEMBER - 135B 




THE FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS 



Just about the time this issue of the 
ATHLETE reaches the member schools of 
the K.H.S.A.A., the regional football champ- 
ions in Classes A and AA will have been 
determined. A week or two later the same 
will be true for Class AAA. 

In Classes A and AA the winners of Reg- 
ion 1 and Region 2, and the winners of Region 
3 and Region 4 will play in semi-final games 
on November 20 or 21. The winners in Reg- 
tion 1 and Region 3 will detei-mine the semi- 
final sites this year under regulations pre- 
viously announced. The final games in these 
classes will be played on the Thanksgiving 
weekend. The sites for these games will be 
determined by the Commissioner under au- 
thority delegated to him by the Board of 
Control. 

Teams in the two Class AAA regions will 
close their seasons on the Thanksgiving 
weekend, and the regional champions will 
play in Louisville on the first weekend in 
December. 

Regional championships will be determined 
by the Dickinson System. This system as 
now used by the K.H.S.A.A. is as follows: 

THE DICKINSON FOOTBALL 

RATING SYSTEM 

SECTION I 

1. First division includes all teams that 
have won more games than they have lost 
during the season. Others are second divis- 
ion teams. 

2. For each victory of a first division team 
over a first division team the winner gets 30 
points and the loser 15 points. 

3. For a tie between two first division 
teams each team gets 221/2 points. 

4. For each victory of a first division team 
over a second division team the first division 
team gets 20 points and the second division 
team gets 10 points. 

5. For each victory of a second division 
team over a first division team the winner 
gets 30 points and the loser gets 10 points. 

6. For each victory of a second division 
team the winner gets 20 points and the loser 
?:ets 10 points. 

7. For each tie between second division 
teams each team gets 15 points. 

8. For each tie between a first division 



team and a second division team the first 
division team gets 15 points and the second 
division team gets 20 points. 

SECTION II 

1. No team shall be penalized for a victory 
in an extra game. To avoid this, the extra 
game shall be omitted from the calculation. 

2. If two second division teams have won 
the same number of victories over first or 
second division teams, but have lost a differ- 
ent number of games to first division teams, 
the extra defeats shall be omitted from the 
calculations. 

SECTION III 

1. An undefeated team shall always be 
ranked above every team it has defeated, 
even though the average number of "points" 
in the season's ratings may indicate other- 
wise. 

2. A team with a percentage of .500 is in 
the second division. It will be considered to 
be in the first division if one third of its 
games have been with first division teams 
and have resulted in at least one tie and one 
victory. 

3. If, in a game having a bearing on the 
championship, a first division team should 
profit by tying another team in the first 
division, when defeating it would lower the 
defeated team into the second division, the 
place of the teams in their divisions shall be 
determined without considering this game. 

SECTION IV 

1. If the foregoing directions have been 
accurately followed, the final standings mav 
be determined by getting the average num- 
ber of points. 

2. If two teams have the same average 
points for the entire season, the victor in 
the e-ame played between them during the 
regular season shall be ranked above the 
loser. 

3. If three teams have the same number 
"f "points" for the entire season, and two 
of them have nlayed each other, the loser in 
this game shall be ranked third and the other 
two tied for the highest rank. 

(Do not attempt to apply this system until 
all of the games of the season have been 
played.) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XXn— No. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1959 



1.00 Per Year 



Playing For Keeps 

Eklitor's Note: This is the address delivered by 
U. S. Commissioner of Education Lawrence G. 
Derthiclc on June 28, 1959, during the National 
Federation Annual Meeting. 

You know well your accomplishments but 
permit me, as one who has been two and 
three steps removed from your activities 
for a number of years, to review a few of 
your accomplishments as I sense them from 
my distance. 

You have: 

1. Brought system and order out of con- 
fusion and have established safeguards and 
controls to prevent evils and destructive in- 
fluences in areas in which our youth are 
most sensitive to forces for good or bad. 

2. Kept the control of interscholastic ath- 
letics in the hands of school authorities and 
generated such powerful strength at State 
levels as to discipline effectively local com- 
munities. 

3. Promoted wide acceptance of high stan- 
dards of ethics and sportsmanship. 

4. Associated yourselves nationally so as 
to benefit from all of the good fruits of pool- 
ing intelligence and experience and sharing 
and disseminating the best ideas and the 
best practices. Naturally you have many, and 
I am sure serious Droblems besetting you, 
but you have the know-how and the ma- 
chinery to solve them. 

5. Undergirded a national program of in- 
terscholastic athletics which has engendered 
in youth the highest values of physical, men- 
tal, and moral strength. (I could cite the 
evaluation of the merits of our soldiers and 
their power for initiative and resourceful- 
ness in battle credited in part to their de- 
velopmental experiences in athltics.) 

6. Evolved standards and practices to ex- 
tend conditions of safety and safety prac- 
tices throughout the country so as to pre- 
vent untold and needless suffering. 

Let us consider now, against such a back- 
ground. What of the Future? This, of course, 
must be examined against the future of edu- 
cation. Think with me then about some of 
those aspects of education's future that will 



bear upon your programs. If you really mean 
to "Play for Keeps" — to keep your gains 
and move forward in times like these — you 
must rise to the challenges that are hard 
upon us. 

One of the most significant, foreseeable 
developments for the next ten years is that 
we shall have new standards of excellence. 
This carries no implications of reflections 
upon our schools of today which are better 
than they have ever been. It only means that 
because of the explosion of knowledge that 
has taken place there is a tremendous expan- 
sion in learning needs and a sharply increased 
demand for trained manpower so that our 
schools must attain new standards of ex- 
cellence to satisfy the requirements. The 
better schools of today reflect an American 
system of education that has no superior. 
Our problems stem largely from our poorer 
schools which are suffering from neglect. 

People are realizing more than ever the 
significance of education in the present 
world-wide race for knowledge. This is 
among the reasons why a number of re- 
sponsible bodies and leaders are calling for 
a doubling of educational expenditures. With 
a doubling of expenditures people will de- 
mand, and we can provide, much higher 
educational standards and increased effic- 
iency. We shall be much better able to at- 
tract and hold top talent and to provide mod- 
ern services and resources to improve quality. 

Another indication of the new standards 
of excellence just ahead is the fact that we 
are beginning to accelerate educational re- 
search. Industry has been spending from 
five to fifteen percent of its operating budget 
for research, whereas in education we have 
only spent a small part of one percent. Re- 
search will open many doors, including an 
extension of the use of electronics, TV, and 
all the newer media. 

Against these new standards of excellence 
you must do your future planning and pre- 
pare for forthright action to meet the de- 
mands. One of the major needs is to extend 
the best in your philosophy for application 
to all boys and girls. As we close the gap 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



NOVEMBER, 1959 VOL XXII— NO. 2 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1967-61), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones, (19S7-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville: Robert 
P. Forsythe (1959-63), Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60). Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



^rom 



the Ci 



ommissionei s 



Off. 



ice 



REPORTS SOON DUE 

1. 1959 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation basket- 
ball examination will be given all over Ken- 
tucky on Monday, December 7, to officials 
who wish to work for the "approved" and 
"certified" ratines. Officials registered with 
the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this year 
and who have not been registered previously 
in any other state associations, are not 
eligible to take the test. Those interested 
should advise the State Office immediately 
in order that necessary arrangements can be 
made with the school administrators who 
will supervise the taking of the exam. Of- 
ficials living in Kentucky need not suggest 
the name of an examiner. The "approved" 
rating does not carry forward from year to 
year, but must be earned each year. After 
an official has received the "certified" rating, 
he keeps this rating by attending clinics 
without having to continue to take the exam 
each year. 

Approved and Certified Officials 

Twenty-seven football officials have quali- 
fied for the "certified" rating this fall, and 
twenty-five for the "approved" rating. These 
officials are: 

Certified Officials — Thomas Bell, Howard 
Bennett, George W. Brown, E. C. Caiman, 
Jr., Travis Combs, John S. Crosthwaite, Jr., 
Jack H. Durkin, Carl Elovitz, Robert H. 
Florence, W. H. Gammon. Newell Hadden, 
Frank Hall, Gene Harris, Fletcher Holeman, 
Bernard Johnson, Carl Lawson, Bob McCol- 
lum, Edgar McNabb, E. B. May, Jr., William 



A. Mordica, Bill Nau, Doug Noland, K. F. 
Schmitt, John H. Shaw, Clifton Stone, Don 
C. Sullivan, Ray Varner, Bart Hagerman. 

Approved Officials — Charles J. Baker, 
John Bartels, Clarence T. Bell, John Canter, 
David A. Carlson, Dan Chambers, Jr., John 
W. Forbes, Jr., Bob Fortney, E. Hugh Fugate, 
Billy Joe Golden, James Graham, Frank 
Heinze, John G. Heinze, William Holbrook, 
Kenneth Kerr, Jim Melmige, James Moss, 
Ted Osborne, Gresham Sacra, Deward Say- 
lor. Bill Scott, William D. Stevens. David G. 
VanMeter, Philip Vinciguerra, Shirley Watts, 
Ed Hanes. 

MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met in the 
K.H.S.A.A. building, Lexineton. on Satur- 
day morning, October 17. 1959. The meeting 
was called to order by Vice-President I^ouis 
Litchfield, at 10:00, with directors Robert 
P. Forsythe, W. H. Crowdus, Jack Dawson, 
K. G. GillasDie, W. B. Jones, and Cecil A. 
Thornton ; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford. 
and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield 
present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the reading of the minutes 
of the July 31st meeting be waived, since the 
members of the Board had received copies 
of these minutes. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Chairman W. H. Crowdus of the Football 
Chamnionship Committee reported that he 
had attended a meeting of school adminis- 
trators and coaches, held at the Beaver Dam 
High School on the evening of October 1 for 
the purpose of creating interest in football 
among the school representatives of the 
Fourth Basketball Region. Also in attend- 
ance at the meeting were Coach Nick Denes 
of Western Kentucky State College and 
K.H.S.A.A. director Bob Forsvthe. Mr. Crow- 
dus stated that it was his opinion that some 
of the schools in the area involved would 
inaugurate football within the next two 
years. 

There was a discussion of the forthcoming 
football playoffs, and the Commissioner was 
authorized to put into effect and carry out 
the regulations previously adopted by the 
Board of Control. 

Chairman W. B. Jones of the Trophy Com- 
mittee reported that his committee had met 
and had selected district and regional basket- 
ball trophies which would be used in the 
forthcoming 1960 tournaments. Mr. Jones 
said that the trophy specifications were now 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



Page Three 



being prepared for the bidders. Robert P. 
Forsythe moved, seconded by Cecil A. 
Thornton, that the report of the Trophy 
Committee be accepted and approved. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by K. G. 
Killaspie, that Edgar McNabb and Joe Ohr 
be named respectively delegate and alternate 
to the forthcoming meeting of the National 
Federation Football Committee. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that it might be 
necessary for the K.H.S.A.A. to borrow some 
money prior to the time of receiving 1960 
State Basketball Tournament money, this 
plan probably being more advisable than that 
of selling bonds or transferring money from 
savings accounts. W. B. Jones moved, 
seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that the Board 
of Control authorize Commissioner Theo. A. 
Sanford to borrow during the fiscal year 
1959-60 for the purpose of paying current 
bills and salaries an amount not to exceed 
twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) . The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Cecil A. 
Thornton, that the next meeting of the 
Board of Control be held in Lexington on 
December 19, 1959. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Cecil A. 
Thornton, that all bills of the Association for 
the period beginning July 31, 1959, and end- 
ing October 16, 1959, be allowed. Included in 
these bills were a few K.H.S.A.A. Protection 
Fund bills, totaling $190.16. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meet- 
ing adjourned. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 

(List Compiled November 1) 



Auxier 
Beaver Dam 
Betsy Layne 
Carr Creek 
College 

(Bowling Green) 
Covington Catholic 
Crab Orchard 
Cumberland County 

(Burkesville) 
DeSales 

(Louisville) 
duPont Manual 

(Louisville) 
Fairview 

(Ashland) 
Ferguson 



Foundation 

(Berea) 
Garrett 
Good Shepherd 

(Frankfort) 
Henderson Settlement 

(Frakes) 
Laurel 

(Camp Dix) 
Lincoln 

(Paducah) 
Lincoln 

(Stanford) 
McCreary County 

(Whitley City) 
McKee 
Mackville 



Menifee County 

(Frenchburg) 
Murray College 

(Murray) 
Oil Springs 
Pleasureville 
Poplar Creek 

(Carpenter) 
Rosenwald 

(Providence) 
St. Benedict 

(Lebanon Junction) 
St. Catherine 

(New Haven) 
St. Joseph 

(Bowling Green) 
St. Mary 

(Alexandria) 



St. Mary's Academy 

(Paducah) 
St. Vincent 
Sebree 
Sedalia 
Slaughters 
South Hopkins 

(Noi-tonville) 
Todd County Trng. 

(Elkton) 
Tompkinsville 
Trimble County 

(Bedford) ' 
Trinity 

(Louisville) 
Warfield 
Wolfe County 

(Campton) 
Woodbine 




M. J. Cavana 
IN MEMORIAM 

M. J. "Bud" Cavana, faculty member of 
the Newport Junior High School and a mem- 
ber of the K.H.S.A.A. State Swimming Com- 
mittee, died in Bellevue, Kentucky, on Sep- 
tember 13, 1959. He is survived by his wife, 
Jane, and his two sons, Jim and Jeff. 

The passing of "Bud" Cavana is felt deep- 
ly, not only by his own community of the 
greater Cincinnati area but also by hundreds 
of friends throughout Kentucky. He was a 
graduate of Newport High School and of the 
University of Kentucky. He was a member 
of the basketball and football squads at the 
University, lettering in football. Although he 
had coached several sports, his particular in- 
terest was swimming, both at the local and 
state levels. He was coach of swimming at 
Newport High School at the time of his death 
and had been for several years. 

The first unofficial State Swimming Meet 
was held at the Morehead State College pool 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



on March 28, 1942, this being an invitational 
affair sponsored by the Boosters' Club of 
Newport and managed by M. J. Cavana. He 
managed a similar meet at Eastern Kentucky 
State College in March of 1946. When the 
first official K.H.S.A.A. State Swimming 
Meet was set up by the Association's Board 
of Control in 1947, it was only natural that 
"Bud" Cavana be named a member of the 
State Swimming Committee. Since that time, 
through his interest and devotion to swin> 
ming, he has been instrumental in keeping 
this sport alive in the K.H.S.A.A. 

Having conducted many swimming meets, 
both A.A.U. and high school, Mr. Cavana was 
in a position to do much for the sport in a 
capacity where capable leadership was hard 
to find. He organized and promoted the first 
conference swimming meet in Kentucky, that 
of the Northern Kentucky Conference, sev- 
eral years ago. He coached hundreds of boys 
and girls in swimming, not only in his com- 
munity but also out of the state. His leader- 
ship will be greatly missed by all of his 
friends in sports and especially by the mem- 
bers of the State Swimming Committee. 

— A.R. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Bach, Leonard, 3137 No. Bend Road, Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

MU 1-1515, MU 1-1515 
Boemker, Bob, 69 Thompson Ave., So. Ft. Mitchell, ED 1-1708, 

PA 1-2700, Ext. 350 
Buchanan, James A., 600 Gibson Drive, Madison, Tennessee, 

TW 5-6130, TH 7-2381, Ext. 239 
Cooke, George W., College Post Office Box 722, Morehead, 

ST 4-5861 
Fey, Allen, 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-6288, KI 1-1800, 

Ext. 1009 
Grace, Hickory E., Jr., Middlesboro, 413 
Griggs, John M., Highland Ave., Prestonsburg, 2958 
James, Gene, 315 Park Ave., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6976, JE 2-7724 
King, James A., 720 So. 43rd Street, Louisville, SP 8-3690 

SP 6-2466 
Massey, Douglas L., Scaffold Cane Rd., Box 1232. Berea 
Nord, Gilbert, 812 S. Shelby, Louisville, JU 7-7766 
Padgett, Ewart M. 54 W. Bel-Air Blvd., Clarksville, Tennessee, 

MI 5-6898, Ft. Campbell 4883 
Rapp, William, 215 Hepler St., Ironton. Ohio, JE 2-1983 
Schellhase, David, 1614 Keck Ave., Evansville, Ind.. HA 5-9790, 

HA 5-6155 
Seal, Frank E.. 1001 Tates Creek Rd.. Lexington 
Thomas. Frank M., 520 So. 10th Street, Louisville 3, JU 7-0441, 

JU 4-9178 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Donald K., 196 Alabama, Winchester PI 4-1199, PI 4-5626 
Adams, Roy D., 302 Brunswick Road, Louisville 7, TW 6-6367 
Albin, J. W., Route 1, Sacramento 
Anderson, Robert A., Box 175, Winfield, W. Va. 
Atwell, Bobby Ray. 1201 Short, Louisville, EM 3-9349 (Bus. No.) 
Baker, James M., P. O. Box 486. Hazard, 6-3822 (Bus. No.) 
Ballaban. Thomas. 4139 St. Lawrence, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
BL 1-0962, PA 1-4040 



Ballard, Jack H., 128 Pine Street, Barbourville, LI 6-4482, 

LI 6-4131 
Hallinger, Richard L„ 820 E. Washington, Louisville 
Barlow, Billy B., 3034 Lynnwood Dr., Paris, 1095W, 2-2220, 

Ext. 226:l 
Barnes, Judson, 1133 Sycamore, Cincinnati, Ohio GA 1-2020 

(Bus. No. I 
Begley. Angus A., P. O. Box 889, Richmond, 9169 
Bell, Henry Burnett, 110 F. Thomas Street, Lexington, 2-5861, 

6-3126 
Bell, Jimmy D., 304y„ S. 12th, Murray, PL 3-2206, PL 3-9047 
Bibb, William C, 2416yo St. Ann, Owensboro, MU 3-8873, 

MU 4-5261 
Black, William, General Delivery, Brookport, Illinois, 3-3738 

I Bus. No.) 
Blanton. Clayton, Pathfork, MO 4-2039 
Blount, William B., 323 Townsend, Madisonville, TA 1-5208, 

TA 1-3178 
Boatright. Carl Hughes, 418 So. Campbell, Lancaster, 491-R 
Bodner, Robert D., 2009 Neville Drive, Louisville, EM 8-3405 
Boyles, Paul E., Box 613. Russell 
Bradford. Earl E., 218 Marion Drive. Glasgow, OL 1-3835, 

OL 1-2256 
Braham, Curtis, Jr., Zebulon, GE 7-4814 
Brooks, Jerry M., 215 Breckinridge Lane, Louisville 7, TW 

5-2049 
Burns, Ronnie, P. O. Box 146, Lynch, 5-762 
Burrows, Walter H., Jr., 712 North 37, Paducah, 3333-6, 

3537-6 
Bunting, John L., Box 845, College Station, Murray 
Cain, Malcolm. 1609 Brigman Ave., Jeffersonville, Indiana, 

BU 2-9703, BU 3-6611 
Caldwell, James, 14 Chesapeake Ave., Newport, CO 1-1786, 

EX 6-9900, Ext. 2354 
Caple. Harold E., 318 Poplar. Ludlow, AX 1-6491 
Carneal, J. T.. Route 3. Kevil, CA 4-2642 
Carpenter, Leonard F., Sublett, FI 9-3403 
Carr, Martin, L., 315 Highland Ave., Cynthiana, 781-J, 

986W-3 
Casteel, Ralph M., East Bernstadt, VI 3-2730, VI 3-2730 
Gates, Vernon R., Sedalia 

Chappell, Joe, 2221 Glenmary, Louisville 4, GL 1-8770, SP 6-8371 
Clift, Sherwin, Box 834, Austin Peay State College, Clarks- 
ville, Tennessee, MI 6-9716 
Conley, Tom W., Route 23, Paintsville, CY 7-3901, 542 
Conn, John D.. College Heights, Bowling Green 
Cooper, Hewlett, Hazel Road, Murray, PL 3-3336, PL 3-3381 
Corrao, Philip J., 29 Coyle Dr., New Albany, Ind., WH 4-9990, 

BU 3-7505 
Cox, Rufus A., 223 Rutter, Earlington, DU 3-4001, DU 3-3301 
Grain, Donald J., 245 Flemingsburg Rd., Box 133, Morehead, 

State 4-5294, State 4-5294 
Cullivan, Jim, College Station, Murray, PL 3-5667, PL 3-2310 
Davis, Bunny, 594 W. Lexington St., Danville, 2079, 1000 
Davis, Donald, 69 Linden, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-7641, CO 1-2980 
DeMoisey, Fox, 227 Highland, Ft. Thomas. HI 1-0795 
Derrick. Charles A., 3 Adrian Ct., Newport, JU 1-7301, JU 

1-2366 
Dodge, Bruce B., Jr., 203 N. Clifton, Louisville, TW 5-1088, 

ME 7-2551 
Dowdy, Donald, 403 Brand St., Mayfield, CH 7-5621, PL 3-5481 
Dunaway, Heber, 102 Vets Village, Richmond 
Edwards, Owen D., Water St., Elkton, CO 5-2553 
Evans, James, Auxier, Prestonsburg 2072 
Everman, William J., Perry, Greenup, Gr 3-3521 
Falls, Harold B.. Box 9, College Post Office, Morehead 
Fannin, Benny J., Betsy Layne, 6R-8-6392 
Farmer, John "Jack" Clay, 122 N. 1st, Danville, 1591-W, 

2662 
Ferguson, Ford, Route 2, Waverly, Ohio 

Foster, Joseph W., 821 Carneal Rd., Lexington, 4-8068, 3-3335 
Erasure, Lois E.. Box 244. Wayland, 2701 
Grace, Hickory E., Jr., Middlesboro, 413 
Gray, Raymond, Island, HU 6-3294, HU 6-3294 
Greer, Bobby G., Lynch, VI 8-5910 

Hampton, Darrell C, c/o Butler County High School, Morgan- 
town, Logansport Exc. 411, La 6-3062 
Hancock, Jackie R., Route 3, Sebree, TU 4-4131 
Hayes, Douglas J.. Box 1223, Morehead State College, More- 
head 
Haynes, John, 416 Clay, Henderson, VA 7-6137 
Hays, Richard. 625 So. Jackson St„ Louisville, JU 3-1398, 

JU 4-3261, Ext. 333 
Heldman. Dr. John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville, EM 3-2181, 

ME 7-2531 
Hendon, L. J., 106 S. 12th Street, Murray, PL 3-3658, PL 3-2825 
Hendren, John F., Co. B 6th Armd Cav., Ft. Knox, WI 2-2556, 

4-6125 
Henson, Tony L., Pryors, FR 6-3721 
Herold, Clarence E., P. O, Box 126C, Sacramento 
Hewitt, R. T., 811 Olive, Murray, PL 3-6436, PL 3-2310, 

Ext. 260 
Hibbs, Eugene, 109 E. Arch St.. Madisonville, TA 1-68U 
Higgins. Bobby D., 457 Pride, Madisonville, TA 1-4809 
Highbaugh, Ottis, Bonnieville, KE 1-1875, KE 1-1200 
Hill. Jimmie, Gausdale 

Hinkle, Melvin B.. 216 Parish Ave., Paris. 791-J, 220 
Hiten, John W., 722 Melrose Ave.. Lexington, 6-6320. 2-262C 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



Page Five 



Hoh, Jack, 30 Pleasant Ridge, So. Ft. Mitchell, ED 1-1860, 

HE 1-3030 
Holcomb, Joe, Boston 

Hoitshouser, Terry W., 714 State St., Bowling Green, VI 2-1938 
Horton, John B., Lyons Apts., P. O. Box 602, Monticello, 

FI 8-2311 (Bus. No.) 
Hughes, Charles, Wayland, 4881 

Hummer Irby, 206 College, Hodgenville, EL 8-3009, EL 8-3000 
Hutchens, Jim, Box 103, Belfry 
Hyatt, Robert L., 6707 Carolyn Road, Louisville, EM 6-1998, 

JU 7-8611 
Ison, Glennon B., 425 Wodlawn Ave., Flemingsburg, VI 5-9893, 

VI 5-4431 
Jackson, Roy, Sebree 

Jewell, Bobby Owen, College Street, Clinton 
Joyce, Clayton, P. O. Box 96, Fulton, 2061, 2080 
Justice, Billy, Box 2183, Williamson, W. Va. 
Kazee, Bill W., 2613 Hampton, Ashland, EA 4-7732 
Kessler, Robert H., 1620 Oleadna Ave., Louisville, EM 6-3780, 

SP 8-6531 
Kiefer, Steve D., 132 Lake St., Bellevue, CO 1-3807, CO 1-3807 
Kilgore, Roger, Maloneton, FL 2-1545 
Kimmel, Jerry, Beechmont, GR 6-2666, OR 6-2276 
King, Allen V., 424 N. Brady, Morganfield, 632-W, 2 or 3 
King, Bob, 119 So. 39th, Louisville, SP 8-4660, SP 8-2763, 

Ext. 36 
King, E. Lawson, 644 S. Limestone, Lexington, 4-1895 
King, John J., Jr., 3610 Brendenwood Road, Valley Station, 

WA 1-1239, ME 4-8316 
King, Price J., 307 Coast Guard Lane, Owensboro, 3-2401 

(Bus. No.) 
Kuhl, Terry W., 245 W. Dixie Ave., Apt. B, Elizabethtown, 

RO 5-2268 
Landolt, Gene, 1002 Payne Street, Murray, PL 3-4707, PL 3-1893 
Lewis, Milus G., Bailey St., Loyall, 1119-W, 2 
Lyons, Harold M., Miley Ave., Cynthiana, 1347-M, 99 
McCord, Coleman, 981 Delia Dr., Lexington, 7-5922, 4-0966 
McDonald, Charles "Chuck", 4009 Lansdowne Dr., Cincinnati 

36, Ohio, TW 1-2265, TW 1-2265 
McDonald, Leslie Legon, 204 S. Main St., Greenville, 818 

Central City (Bus. No.) 
McGuire, Paul R., 355 Linden Walk, Lexington, 4-4329 
Maddox. Donald, 414 W. Noel, Madisonville TA 1-2942 
Mahurin, Larry R., Route 3, Sebree, TU 4-4675 
Malone, Donald R., 2530 13th Street, Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-4086, 

JE 2-6224 
Mathews. William H., 488 Lamont Ct., Lexington, 7-3708, 

22260, Ext. 2742 
Meadows, Marvin, Clayhole 
Meeks. Jack, 407 5th St., Corbin, 415, 661 
Messerian, Nishan, Bowman Hall, Box 1666, Univ. of Ky., 

Lexington, 2-2200, Ext. 3494 
Miles, Francis M., 1142 So. 36th Street, Louisvilel, SP 6-2881 
Miller, James E., 132 Frisby, Monticello, FI 8-3917 
Moore, Arnold David, 2254 Griffith, Ashland. EA 4-9891 
Moore, Pete, 133 Pine St.. Barbourville, 6-3649, Union College 
Moseley, Hugh W. "Bill", 106 So. 40th, Louisville, SP 8-0305 
Mueller, Frank J., 678th Ord. Co., Camp McCoy, Wisconsin 
Newman, Bill, 2535 Ritchie, Portsmouth, Ohio, El 3-6257 
Newsom, Marley, 109 Division St., Pikeville, 7-6782 
Newton, Reason G., Lebanon Junction, Temple 3-4683 
Noble, Leonard, Jackson. NO 6-2430, NO 6-9224 
Noel, (Seorge E., South Portsmouth, FL 2-1271 
Noel, Paul W., Main Street, Midway, TH 6-4101 
Padget, R. K., 123 N. Central Ave., Somerset, 961-W, 12 
Perry, George D., 704 Mechanic. Princeton, 5616, 2633 
Petett, Frank M., 226 Garmon, Glasgow, Olive 1-2574, Olive 

1-2266 
Phelps, Dale, Stanlord, Science Hill 
Phelps, Ralph Ray, P. O. Box 1285, Morehead State College, 

Morehead, ST 4-4323 
Piper, Lowell, P. O. Box 718, Uniontown. 87 
Prather, Wilbur E., 1512 Berry Blvd., Box 15, Louisville, 

EM 3-2908 
Pruitt, Donald Wayne, 605 Waterfield Dr., Clinton 
Purdy, Jesse, Route 2, Bradfordsviile 
Rail, Eugene, 106 Reservoir Rd., Frankfort, CA 7-2366, CA 

7-2231, Ext. 202 
Rannells, Richard H., Box 291, Morehead State College, More- 
head 
Rapp, William, 216 Heplar St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-1983 
Reed, Ed, 19 Sunset Drive, Alexandria, MY 7-3081, EX 7-1500 
Riggs, Morgan E., 1702 Larkmoor, Louisville 18, GL 8-6240, 

GL 8-6240 
Riggs, William T., 28 Congress Dr., Morganfield, 590 
Reed. Cliford, Box 36, Hodgenville, EL 8-3664 
Ritter, Goebel, 104 Wooton Street, Hazard, GE 6-2453, GE 

6-3611 
Roark, Paul G., Linefork 

Roberts, Earl C, 204 Stratford Ave., Richmond, 153-W, 683 
Robertson, William R., 121 Main St., Springfield, 4164, 9955 
Rodgers, David, P. O. Box 431, London, VO 4-4542 
Rucker, William T., Box 893, Eastern Ky. State College, 

Richmond, 9159 
Ruggiero, Ralph, 1403 Hughes, Murray 

Sallee, Claude, Jr., Box 674, Morehead State College, Morehead 
Samples, Bernard M., Box 263, Corbin, 144-J, 1360 



Scott. Charles E., Wayland, 4901 

Sellman John Byron, 423 Deerfield Lane, Louisville 7, 

TW 7-2767, JU 5-3393 
Shiflett, Wendell P., 125 Park Drive, Pt. Pleasant, W. Va. 
Siler, Clarence M., 8th & Cumberland Ave., Williamsburg, 6188 
Simms Sylvester, 305 N. Donivan, Princeton, 5101, 2156 
Small, William W. "Bill", Jr., 1846 Mary Catherine Dr., 

Louisville 16, EM 8-8365, GL 1-1882 
Smith, David W., 8107 Rory Way, Louisville 19, WO 9-0060. 

ME 6-2531 
Smith, Willard N., Cane Valley. FUL 4-6943, 312 Taylor Co. 

Health Dept. 
Solomon, Jim. 1629Vii Farmer Ave., Murray 
Spahr, David, Route"4, Paducah, 3-3252, 2-4634 
Spaulding, Stan, 434 Gordon, Waverly, Ohio, 519-M, 51 
Starns, Harry T., 170 Forest Ave., Lexington, 2-4326 
Steely, Stanley E., South 11th, Williamsburg, 3641 
Stone, Sidney P., Box 606, Uniontown, 86 

Strong, Davis, Box 33. Howard Air Force Base. Canal Zone 
Swim, Gerald, P. O. Box 323, Evarts, 1262 
Taylor, Roger E., Route 1, (jrandview Dr., Owensboro, 4-4246 

(Bus. No.) 
Thomas, Frank M., 520 So. 10th St., Louisville 
Thurman, Armon E., 3205 Allen, Owensboro, MU 3-9583 
ToUe, Charles W., 106 W. Penn Street, Cynthiana, 363-J, 1148 
Turner, Aaron P.. Lacy School, Hopkinsville 
Turner, Bruce, 1466 High St., Paris, 634, 9060 
VanArsdall, Fred, Burgin, 6104 

Vance, Earl G., 826 W. Main, Glasgow, OL 1-3083, OL 1-5205 
VanWinkle, Billy R., 2624 Cloverdale Dr., Owensboro, MU 

3-6617, Foust Jr. High 
Wearren, Wade H., Box 470, College Station, Murray 
Webb, Oren H., Sweeden 
Welch, Frank T., Sidney 

Wendel, Jerry, 250 Ward Ave., Bellevue, HE 1-6557, MA 1-3016 
White, Harlie, Jr., 207 Fifth Street, Tompkinsville 
White, William Jason, Eddyville, 3052, 3391 
Williams, George W., East Bernstadt, VI 3-2602 
Williams. Willie H., 519C So. Aspendale, Lexington, 2-1654, 

2-3212 
Witt, Fred, Whitesburg, 2661 

Woodward, Billy, 1716 W. 12th, Owensboro, MU 4-2269 
Woratschek, John N., MCA 3046 B, Ft. Campbell. 3857, 5884 
Wray, Darel, Water Valley 
Yates, Virgil J., Box 456, Wingo, FR 6-2432. FR 6-3271 



Why Boys Play Football 

Much has been written on competitive 
sports. It is a favorite theme of the banquet 
speaker. We have been well briefed on why 
a boy should participate in football and other 
bodily contact sports. We know of the bene- 
fits to the individual — physical, social and 
moral. We know too, that society benefits 
by having added to it individual members 
who are stronger, braver, and cleaner by 
having played the game. 

All that we can readily understand. Now 
approaching it from another angle, why do 
boys play football? 

What is the lure of the game that is so 
demanding in this era of high pressure com- 
petition ? To the public, football is a dramatic 
spectacle that provides relaxing week ends 
throughout the fall months. It is a meeting 
place for old grads and a rallying point for 
all students and alumni of the school. But to 
the players? To them it is a field of hard- 
ship, sacrifice, discomfort and danger in a 
land of abundance and luxury. Why do boys, 
of their own accord, choose to play the game ? 

Football offers the age-old challenge to 
man's spirit. It is the challenge of danger 
and hardship that has lured the strong and 
the brave to sail uncharted seas, to scale 
mountain peaks, to explore new lands and 



tage Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



trace their rivers to their sources. Then 
there is the lure of companionship. The 
bonds of companionship become stronger 
when an experience of danger or hardship 
is shared with your comrades. When boys 
bow down in the huddle together and brace 
themselves shoulder to shoulder in a goal 
line stand, they gain a new concept of com- 
panionship. There is a close bond and un- 
derstanding among those who have worn 
the cleated shoes in varsity competition. 
In most areas of our modern society, we must 
accept a person at his own evaluation. In 
more primitive times, danger and hardship 
were ever present and a man was more 
often required to exhibit his courage and 
fortitude in the presence of his associates. 
Now he has more means of concealing his 
frailties. But on the football field, there is 
little to hide behind. The mask of pretense is 
removed and you see the man as he really is. 

Then there is the lure of adventure and 
the lure of conquest. The same appeal that 
led Marco Polo to the Far East impels a boy 
to walk up to the coach and ask for a uniform. 

So as you look down on that gridiron this 
fall, you will see there the strong, the bold 
and the daring. You will see the spirit of 
Lancelot and stout Cortez. It is the spirit 
that has conquered, explored and built em- 
pires. Moreover, football not only attracts 
the strong, but it builds greater strength 
into the lives of those who are lured to it. 

AND WHY DO BOYS PLAY FOOTBALL ? 
When Wilfrid Noyes was asked why he climb- 
ed the Himalayan Peaks, his reply was, "I 
climb because I like it." George Mallory's 
classic answer to this question was, "Be- 
cause it's there." Many boys play football 
because it's there. Let's keep it there for 
the bold young explorers of tomorrow! 

— Dwight Keith, Coach and Athlete. 

High School Swimming Rules 

by Charles E. Forsythe 
The meeting of the Point National Colleg- 
iate-National Federation Swimming Rules 
Committee was held at Fort Collins, Colorado, 
April 16-18, 1959. I attended this meeting 
as a representative of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associa- 
tions. David Robertson, Swimming Coach, 
New Trier High School, Winnetka, Illinois, 
advisory member representing the Inter- 
scholastic Swimming Coaches Association of 
America, also was present. The changes 
indicated below are those which will affect 
interscholastic swimming for 1959-60 season. 
RULE 1, SECTION 4 - ORDER OF EVENTS 



The position in the order of events of the 
100 Yard Freestyle and the 100 Yard Breast- 
stroke has been reversed. In other words, the 
100 Yard Breaststroke will be event No. 5 
and the 100 Yard Freestyle will be event No. 
6 in dual and championship meets. 

Also, in the order of events the 150 Yard 
Individual Medley will be replaced by the 
200 Yard Individual Medley in 75 foot pools. 
The 120 Yard Individual Medley in 60 foot 
pools will be replaced by one of 160 yards in 
length. The Breaststroke is the new stroke 
which will be added to the Individual Medley. 

In Section 4 in the Rules Book a note will 
appear to allow state high school athletic as- 
sociations in each state, if they desire to do 
so, to permit a change in personnel of relay 
team members competing in a state meet 
from those who may have qualified in a 
preceding district or regional meet. This pro- 
cedure is not mandatory to a state but it will 
allow for substitutions, if desired, for origin- 
al district or regional qualifiers, in relay 
only, who may take part in a state meet held 
later than the date of district or regional 
qualifying meets. 
RULE IX, SECTION 1 - BREASTSTROKE 

The first sentence in this Section will be 
deleted as also will be the provisions of Part 
(e) of Section 1. The new Section 1 (a) 
will read as follows: "The Breakststroke 
must be swum on the surface. Following the 
take-off and each turn, one arm pull and one 
leg kick may be taken under water, but some 
portion of the contestant's head must break 
the surface of the water before another 
stroke is started. Except for this provision, 
some portion of the contestant's head must 
be higher than the normal, flat surface of 
the water at all times." 

RULE XH, SECTION 1 
INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY 

With the change in the Individual Medley 
to races of 200 yards and 160 yards in 25 
yard and 20 yard pools, respectively, there 
is no need for the Second Section previously 
included in this Rule. The heading will be 
changed to read "INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY - 
INTERCOLLEGIATE AND INTERSCHOL- 
ASTIC." Section 1, as it applies to high 
schools, now will read as it has been in effect 
for this event in intercollegiate competition 
as follows: "The Individual Medley shall be 
a race in which the first one-fourth of the 
distance shall be Butterfly Stroke, the second 
one-fourth Backstroke, the third one-fourth 
Breaststorke, and the last one-fourth any 
stroke other than the first three." 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



Page Seven 



The Flying Dutchman 

Almost 2500 officials, coaches, players and 
fans turned out for the Basketball Clinics. 
With the personable Joe Billy (Assistant 
Commissioner) serving as navigator on our 
eastern swing, we not only were lost in the 
Kentucky Mountains most of the time but 
we also were snowed under with the fine 
hill country hospitality. The same famous 
hospitality was in evidence in the western 
section but with the "Navigator" back in his 
Lexington office the meetings lost some of 
the color provided by the "Personable One's" 
jokes. 

Officials all over Kentucky were directed 
to emphasize four phases of officiating in 
their decisions this year: 

(1) The ball must be tossed correctly and 
NOT CARELESSLY for the jump. It must 
be tossed at right angles to the floor and 
higher than either of the jumpers can jump. 

(2) Administer the running rule strictly. 
Do not permit players to get away with those 
extra steps. 

(3) Don't call fouls on those defensive 
men who execute fine guarding plays against 
the shooter. It is felt that many times a 
shooter gets free shots when his guard 
should be receiving praise instead of penalty. 

(4) When a coach comes on the floor with- 
out permission or verbally abuses an official. 
A TECHNICAL FOUL MUST BE CALLED. 

Already the sixteen regional representa- 
tives of the K.H.S.A.A. are starting to set 
up their training sessions. The youthful 
Briscoe Inman, who trains the whistlers in 
Region 12, is "one the ball." "Brainy Briscoe" 
has mailed 150 letters to all coaches and of- 
ficials in an 80-mile radius of Danville, ad- 
vising them of his clinic on mechanics at 
Centre College gymnasium in November. 
Briscoe is also going to emphasize proper 
dress and ethics. For this he is to be com- 
mended. 

Irby Hummer, the Hodgenville financier 
and golfing enthusiast, gets a Corn Cob Pipe 
Award this month for his work with the 
South Central Officials Association. Irby is 
president. Bill Strange is vice-president. Cliff 
Reed is secretary-treasurer and "Jolly Kean" 
Jenkins is director of public relations. Irby's 
aim at the development of trained officials 
with professional attitudes won the award 
for him. 

James Pheane Ross of Lexington got this 
month's second cob award for his work with 
recreation in Kentucky. Pheane says he 



treasures his award highly and that the 
pipe, horseman and certificate are proudly 
displayed. In Pheane's words, "The horse- 
man is riding at full gallop on my desk and 
the certificate is hanging close by." 

As soon as the Dutchman finishes this 
column he will set his sights on the Indiana 
Education Association which meets in In- 
dianapolis in October. Commissioner L. V. 
Phillips of the Indiana High School Athletic 
Association has invited the Dutchman to 
speak to his association of principals, 
coaches and officials at the I.E. A. The 
Dutchman gave Colonel Phillips two sub- 
jects to select from namely, "Will Officials 
Go To Heaven," and "Hardwood and Hard- 
heads." The Commissioner chose the latter 
saying that if one per cent of our hardheads 
come to the meeting, you will have an over- 
flow audience. I guess he already knew 
the answer to the first subject. 

One thing was especially enjoyable about 
this year's clinic tour. For the first time in 
the Dutchman's 18 years of clinic work for 
the K.H.S.A.A., a member of the Board of 
Control accompanied him on a part of the 
trip. "Johnie" Crowdus made a hit at the 
sessions he took part in. "Johnie" also made 
a score at the State White House Conference 
on Youth held this month. An expert in the 
Field of Recreation, Board Member Crowdus 
made his prese nce count at the meetings. 

Being a golfing duffer this thought oc- 
curred to us at Hazard. Goebel Ritter, who 
is regarded as the longest driver in the moun- 
tains, should be put in a foursome with 
"Johnie" Crowdus who relies on brain in- 
stead of brawn for his victories, Kean Jen- 
kins who talks you out of holes, and Pike- 
ville's Dick Looney who is now having a hard 
time hitting the small white ball because of 
his expanding mid-section. A lot of people 
would pay money to see that foursome. 

Murray's Garrett Beshear gets credit for 
being the best material for that town's 
Chamber of Commerce. Sitting beside Gar- 
rett at Mayfield, we got the best lecture on 
the beauties and advantages of that western 
city that could be given. Undoubtedly one of 
the greatest basketball players of all time, 
this popular fellow loves young people, sports 
and Murray State. He is a credit to them all. 

Starting with this column, the Dutchman 
is trying to find the most indefatigable of- 
ficial in the Commonwealth. By the end of 
the year we hope to properly recognize that 
official basketball or football, who has ac- 
cumulated the greatest number of years and 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



has officiated the most seasons. Send your 
nomination, a picture of the gentleman, and 
a very short story to The Flying Dutchman, 
Armory Building, Louisville 2, Kentucky. 

This month's nominations are the Uni- 
versity of Louisville's "Jolly John" Heldman, 
Jr., and "Rovin Jack" Thompson, who might 
be found calling games anywhere in "Inner 
or Outer Space." Our information on these 
two is not reliable but we believe that be- 
tween them they have been officiating al- 
most one hundred years. Neither shows any 
indication of slowing up or retiring. Whom 
do you know who can match these "ageless 
abriters?" Who will be Mr. Methuselah of 
1960? 

The Dutchman is following a new policy 
of closing each column with a bit of Dutch 
philosophy. Here goes for this month: One 
of the great things about living in a democ- 
racy is that we have complete control of 
how we pay our taxes. We may pay by cash, 
check or money order. Did you know that an 
unkind remark is like a killing frost? No 
matter how much it warms up later, the 
damage remains. 



PLAYING FOR KEEPS 

(Continued from Page One) 

between philosophy and application we are 
driven by our ideals of the sacredness of the 
individual and by the demands for trained 
manpower in this scientific age, with a kind 
of competition we have not heretofore known. 
We will be more concerned than ever by the 
high school dropouts, as well as the athletic 
leftouts. 

You must, therefore: 

1. Advance your far-reaching programs 
of interscholastic athletics. Their role is ex- 
tremely important for all of the values I 
cherished and served as a high school prin- 
cipal. 

2. Actually bring philosophy and practice 
together through intramural programs. New 
standards of excellence will no longer toler- 
ate restricting these values to the few. 
Imaginative procedures must be planned and 
executed for bringing glamour and success to 
intramurals or any other sound means for 
reaching all with these experiences. 

3. Take leadership in bringing into balance 
recognition for all pupils who achieve, 
whether in academic pursuits, athletics, or 
otherwise. 

4. Have ample resources in teachers and 
coaches to do the job better — intramurals 



incidentally will elevate the quality of inter- 
scholastic athletics. 

5. Secure adequate support from public 
funds for all such activities. 

6. Look ahead — rise above immediate 
problems of the day. Face and deal with the 
pressures that restrict wider application of 
the best in your philosophy. 

7. Extend the techniques of research and 
experimentation and the facilities of the 
mass media to your field. 

Your leaders, in writing about my assign- 
ment, asked me to give something of my ex- 
periences heading the first official educa- 
tional mission from our country to the 
USSR. There will be very little time for 
that, but let me say briefly in passing that 
the major impression of our delegation had 
to do with the attitude toward education on 
the part of the Russians, sparing no expense 
in their conviction that in the race for knowl- 
edge education is the prime instrumentality 
to use in "reaching and overreaching Ameri- 
ca." They are convinced that they will attain 
their objective with trained minds. 

The Russians are enthusiastic about sports 
and have a deep love for them. But they 
seem chiefly concerned about providing for 
a wide degree of participation by all boys 
and girls. They put great emphasis upon 
physical education and health, including 
intramurals, and provide one full-time doctor 
for each two schools and one trained nurse 
for each school. Such is their interest in 
health, physical education and athletic activ- 
ities. 

My subject reminds me of a conversation 
I had with the Minister of Education in 
USSR. We were arguing the relative 
merits of our two systems of society. He 
said, "You believe in individual initiative; 
we believe in a planned society — let time 
tell." Meaning, in his mind, that time would 
prove that his side was right. But we know 
a planned society has limitations, whereas in 
a democracy there is no limitation beyond 
that which we impose upon ourselves. 

This challenge means that we must stop 
taking our blessings for granted and give 
our best without limit to strengthen democ- 
racy. One of the approaches is to provide 
a good strong program in which all boys and 
girls will have the benefits of athletics, 
intramurals, and physical education. 

As we contemplate the next ten years we 
know beyond doubt there will be great ef- 
forts to overcome the disadvantages of small 
schools through consolidation of school dis- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



Page Nine 



tricts. You have an opportunity, therefore, 
to develop an athletic blueprint for new con- 
solidated school districts. It is an opportunity 
to prevent bad and promote good practices. 

And, since for a number of reasons, we 
shall continue to have in the next ten years 
many small schools, there is the challenge 
for you to invent and promote ways to en- 
rich small schools. For example, in other as- 
pects of school programs there is experi- 
mentation with multiple classes, supervised 
correspondence courses, school aids, elec- 
tronic communication, flexible schedules, 
and shared services, in order to bring en- 
richment to these youngsters who suffer 
fro mthe restrictions of small schools. 

Thus, perhaps you could invent a system 
of flexible schedules and shared services to 
give a good coach to each of several schools ; 
perhaps you could develop a system of joint 
teams and certainly intramurals. The sky 
is the limit in what you may try. 

As industry and government and the mili- 
tary are providing continuing programs of 
intensive training for executives, we in edu- 
cation need to extend opportunities for our 
leaders. For years you have been leaders in 
providing schools for coaches. You are on 
the right track and you need to extend these 
opportunities because we are going to need 
many more coaches in the next ten years, 
trained up to the minute. 

Changes are constantly taking place in 
physical plants. What are you doing to con- 
tribute ideas, putting invention into play; 
what changes in buildings and equipment 
should there be for your programs? 

Before concluding I want to cite certain 
values that will not and must not change. 
I refer to those experiences related to your 
unique opportunitiess to get close to children 
and youth and move deeply in their hearts. 
As a school principal I often would say that 
I wouldnt have a school without athletics, 
and I wouldnt have athletics without the 
kind of controls that your associations have 
developed. 

I wish I might cite case after case that 
I cherish in which I have seen your programs 
reach the hearts of youth. I have seen boys 
and girls learn to extend the rules and prac- 
tices of good sportsmanship, fair play and 
teamwork to all of their relationships. I 
am thinking also of the spiritual and char- 
acter values of good clean sports and vigor- 
ous sportsmanlike competition. These are 
values that must be reemphasized and ex- 
tended in times like these. 



A Job To Do 



Good sportsmanship is the "most noble" 
of all interscholastic athletic program ob- 
jectives to a great many leaders in educa- 
tion. The opportunities for teaching and 
for acquiring this fine attitude are abundant 
in sports. Unfortunately, wrong attitudes are 
just as easy to acquire if the contests are 
permitted to degenerate to demonstrations 
of poor sportsmanship. 

Each of the groups concerned with ath- 
letics, that is the administrators, officials 
and coaches, have a definite responsibility to 
have all games played in as sportsmanlike 
atmosphere as possible. This is not an over- 
whelming responsibility, but it does require 
planning, courage, determination and vigil- 
ance to insure maximum benefits. 

Good sportsmanship is not a complicated 
attitude. It can be easily defined and readily 
recognized. Fortunately, violations can be 
detected just as easily. 

Good sportsmanship simply means playing 
the game according to the spirit as well as 
the letter of the rule; it means the winner 
does not gloat nor does the loser alibi. Those 
with leadership responsibility must make 
certain these simple tenets are observed. 

When an official agrees to work a game 
he accepts the responsibility of enforcing 
the rules. A traditional rule requires football 
officials to penalize promptly for unsports- 
manlike conduct on the part of coaches and 
players. With all due respect to the excellent 
manner in which most football officials dis- 
charge their game responsibilities, many 
have not been as vigilant in penalizing this 
foul as they could and should be. 

The Alliance Football Rules Committee 
recognized this fact when, at its most recent 
meeting, it strengthened, as much as pos- 
sible, the rule prohibiting coaching from 
the sideline and all unsportsmanlike conduct. 

The Rules Committee has traditionally 
provided officials with the tool they need to 
enforce penalties for violations of unsports- 
manlike conduct. It is up to the officials to 
discharge their responsibilities so that vio- 
lations of this rule are penalized promptly. 
Officials must supply the initiative and the 
courage and determination to enforce the 
rules. 

The Rules Committee has provided the 

tools — the officials must put them to work. 

—Clifford B. Fagan. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



Basketball Hall of Fame 

By Lyle T. Quinn, Iowa H.S.A.A. 

The National Association of Basketball 
Coaches in 1936 was successful in raising 
sufficient funds to send Dr. and Mrs. James 
Naismith to Berlin to attend the 1936 
Olympics. The honors heaped upon Dr. Nai- 
smith gave evidence of tne world-wide spread 
in the importance of basketball as an inter- 
national game. The National Association of 
Basketball Coaches immediately thereafter 
began exploring ways and means for the 
creation of a permanent memorial to the 
game of basketoall and its founder. In 1948 
the first Basketball Hall of i^'ame Commit- 
tee was organized and funds were subse- 
quently voted to carry on its activity and an 
office was set up at Springfield College, 
where the college administration furnishea 
the necessary facilities. Springfield College 
was the natural location for a basketball 
hall of fame since it was there in December 
of 1891 that the first game of basketball was 
played under the direction of Dr. Naismith, 
who had on several subsequent occasions, 
indicated that it was his wish and desire 
that should a memorial to the game ever be 
established, it should be established at 
Springfield, the birthplace of the game. 

The plans have been completed for the 
creation of a building to cost approximately 
one-half million dollars. Construction is 
planned to be started early in the Fall of 
1959. An investment of $1,000 in the Hall of 
Fame Building by an institution carries with 
it an institutional membership in the cor- 
poration with a voice and vote. A personal 
investment of $100 carries with it a life 
membership in the corporation. A $25 in- 
vestment carries a five-year membership. 
Any such investments may be paid in full 
or by suitable installments over a period of 
Lime convenient to the investor. 

The Hall of Fame for Basketball will be 
operated under the direction of an Execu- 
tive Committee selected by the members of 
the National Association of Basketball 
Coaches and from the responsible groups 
and individuals vitally interested in basket- 
ball. The title to the property will be held 
in the name of the "Basketball Hall of Fame, 
Incorporated," a non-profit organization 
created to handle all legal, financial, contrac- 
tual and business matters incidental to the 
project. The physical maintenance will be 
covered through the budget of the corpora- 
tion and carried on through cooperative ar- 



rangements with Springfield College. Jani- 
torial and housekeeping duties will be under 
the supervision of the College, acting for 
the corporation. The annual financial budget 
will be provided from door fees and from 
concession sales at the museum, increased as 
needed by contributions, by receipts from 
special games, and income from endowment 
funds. Experience in similar projects has 
indicated that when the museum and library 
become going concerns the plant will be fully 
self-supporting. Every member of the cor- 
poration will have a voice in the direction 
and management of this tangible evidence of 
interest and appreciation of those not only 
directly connected with and engaged in 
basketball activities, but also those millions 
who must engage as onlookers and sup- 
porters 

The building will house a museum which 
will reveal a basketball history in terms of 
souvenirs and mementos of the founder, 
former players, coaches, teams and institu- 
tions. A pageantry of growth of game in 
terms of equipment, playing areas, and spec- 
tator space. A replica of gym room where the 
frame was first played, with markings indica- 
tive of change to date serving as a main dis- 
play room. 

The building will house a library contain- 
ing complete historical coverage to the 
present and also containing a collection of 
all books, magazines, papers, and other print- 
ed material pertaining to basketball for the 
purpose of providing a working library for 
students of the game. The building will house 
a stage and equipment necessary to present 
movies, demonstrations and addresses. A 
memorial room which will include many per- 
sonal effects of Dr. Naismith, the original 
first draft of the rules of the game as typed 
by Dr. Naismith himself, and many other 
important and historical items. 

A selection of individuals to be honored in 
the Basketball Hall of Fame will be made by 
the Basketball Hall of Fame Honors Com- 
mittee which consists of 13 members, one 
from the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, 
two active members of the National Associa- 
tion of College Basketball Coaches, two Ex- 
ecutive Secretaries of State High School 
Athletic Associations, one member of the 
Y.M.C.A., one member of the A.A.U., one 
active member of the International Board 
of Approved Basketball Officials, two from 
the Press, Newspaper, Radio and/or Tele- 
vision, two from the Sporting Goods indus- 
try, one from the field of professional basket- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



Page Eleven 



ball. The first Honors Committee was ap- 
pointed on March 21, 1958, and proceeded 
with the tremendous task and responsibility 
of drawing up the rules and regulations to 
be followed by the Honors Committee. One 
of the requirements of the Committee is 
that a person elected to the Hall of Fame 
must receive ten (10) affirmative votes of 
the thirteen members of the Committee. Dur- 
ing the year of March, 1958 to March, 1959, 
the Honors Committee elected Dr. James Nai- 
smith, his original team of nine players and 
three old-timers to the basketball Hall of 
Fame. The Honors Committee held their 
first meeting in Louisville. Kentucky, March 
17, 1959. The second meeting of the Honors 
Committee was held in Chicago on occasion 
of the Pan-American game August 30, 1959. 
The Honors Committee is in the process at 
the present time of screening applications of 
individuals who are candidates for election 
to the Hall of Fame. 



Here and There 

A recent nation-wide survey of Junior 
High School interscholastic athletics reveals 
basketball is nlaved in more schools than any 
other sport. On the basis of the number of 
teams participating, the first ten most popu- 
lar activities rank in this order: basketball, 
track, tackle football, baseball, softball, 
swimming, wrestling, soccer, tennis and 
volleyball. 

Willard B. Knowles, upon the expiration of 
his term as President of the Federated Coun- 
cil for the CALIFORNIA Interscholastic 
Federation Protection Fund, was commended 
for services rendered to high school youth 
in California by Dr. Roy E. Simpson, Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction and Director 
of Education for the State of California De- 
partment of Education. Mr. Knowles was 
cited for "exceptional professional leadership 
in serving as President of the Federation 
Council and for his willingness to accept this 
important post and for unselfish devotion to 
the service of high school youth in Califor- 
nia." Mr. Knowles is presently an Executive 
Committeeman from Section 7 and Vice- 
Chairman of the National Alliance Football 
Rules Committee. 

The ONTARIO Federation of School Ath- 
letic Associations, Toronto, Ontario, is com- 
prised of nine separate Associations. There 
are 329 school with a total enrollment of 
203,535 in these nine Associations, which in- 
clude both public and private schools. The 



Federation, which has a budget of approxi- 
mately $25,000 annually, sponsors a full pro- 
gram of ]6 sports, including rugby, basket- 
ball, track and field., badminton, cross-coun- 
try, curling, golf, gymnastics, hockey, rug- 
ger, skiing, soccer, swimming, tennis, volley- 
ball and wrestling. Including the senior, jun- 
ior and sub-junior divisions, there are 372 
teams playing rugby, with 10,150 boys par- 
ticioatini-. There are 631 schools sponsoring 
basketball teams in the three divisions and 
providing competition for over 7 770 boys. 
Track and field, with the greatest number 
of teams (701) provides competition for 
over 9.000 boys. 93 schools sponsor volley- 
ball, 59 badminton and 57 hockey. N. A. 
Beach, who attended the National Fereda- 
tion's annual meeting at Chattanooga dur- 
ing the past summer is the Federation's ex- 
ecutive Secretary. 

CHARLES VETTINER, former member 
of the National Basketball Rules Committee 
and the Kentucky rules interpreter, again 
this year conducted the annual state-wide 
invitation "1 basketball rules clinic for the 
Indiana High School Athletic Association, 
held at Indianapolis on Saturday, September 
26. It was the meeting's purpose to discuss 
rules interpretations, officiatinor techniques 
and official rulings for the comino: season. 
The clinic was attended bv Indiana instruc- 
tors and men who will act as interpreters 
for sectional clinics. 

STEPHEN EPLER, inventor of 6-Man 
Football and Chairman of the 6-Man Foot- 
ball Rules Committee, recently became the 
28th member elected to the Nebraska Sports 
Hall of Fame. Epler, who is presently the 
Superintendent and Principal of Reedley 
Colleore- Reedley. California, invented 6-Man 
Football while attending a summer session 
at Nebraska University. During his Mas- 
ter's thesis preparation, Epler considered 
the athletic problems facing the small high 
schools which had no football team or such 
small squads they were unable to compete 
equitably with other schools. Some small 
schools were unable to field football teams 
because of the cost of outfitting a 25 or 30 
man souad. The game Epler proposed re- 
quired less expensive equipment, fewer play- 
ers, reduced the danger of injuries and pro- 
vided an opportunity to compete in an activ- 
ity offering physical contact through block- 
ing and tackling. The first 6-Man game was 
played at Hebron, Nebraska on October 3, 
1934 between the schools of Hardy-Chester 
and Belvidere-Alexandria. The game was 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1959 



well attended. The new sport grew rapidly, 
being played by small schools all over the 
country. At the present time there is a swing 
to 8-Man Football but there still are over 
60 6-Man teams in Nebraska alone. 

THE OREGON School Activities Associa- 
tion is circulatins: a questionnaire to all 
school boards in the state, asking them to 
indicate if they desire to continue the exist- 
ing chamnionshin series in various sports. 
Early reports indicate schools are voting 7 
to 1 to retain championships in all the activ- 
ities of the athletic program. Surplus snow 
parkas secured at a reduced price by an en- 
terprising athletic director in the State of 
Oregon have been bleached and then striped 
like football officials' shirts. The parkas to 
be worn bv the chain crew and down box 
m^n will assist spectators, as well as coaches 
and plavers, in quickly locating the line to 
gain even on rainy football nights which are 
frequent in Oregon during the fall season. 

The Medical Association of the State of 
ALABAMA, through its Committee on 
Public Relations, has provided the Alabama 
high school athlete. The leaflets are con- 
series of leaflets for distribution to its mem- 
bers which outline the responsibilitv of the 
school administrator, the team physician and 
ti^e parent in protecting the health of the 
hieh school athlete. The leaflets are con- 
veniently sized and interestinorlv written. 
The Medical Association's service in this re- 
sppK^t will contribute to the Alabama Hieh 
School Association's Foal of protecting the 
phvsicfl welfare of athletes who participate 
interscholasticallv. 



The "Big Hearted" Athlete' 

Athletes mav have bigger hearts than 
other persons but this is no indication that 
there is anvthinsr wrong with them, accord- 
ing to the Committee on the Medical Aspects 
of Sports of the American Medical Associa- 
tion. The AMA Committee (formerly known 
as the Committee on Iniury in Snorts) point- 
ed out that the heart, like any other muscle 
of the body, becomes larger as the result of 
physical activity. But this does not mean that 
it is damaged in any way by the exercise. 

There is no evidence to show that exercise 
has ever damaged a healthv heart in a prop- 
r,er]v conditioned athlete. In fact, the ath- 
lete's heart will not only become larger but 
will also become stronger, the Committee 
said. The myth of "athletic heart" has been 
exploded long ago but the belief persists in 
some circles. Hearts are damaged by disease 



and not by participation in athletics, it was 
stated. The heart weakened by disease in 
some cases is dilated or ballooned-out but 
this has no relationship to the large heart 
of the athlete, the walls of which as a result 
of exercise, have been strengthened and built 
up in muscular bulk. The functioning of every 
i^eart presents an individual problem and 
^1t'« heart disease is also a highly individual 
matter. 

Coaches and leaders of athletics and 
recreational sports should watch for the fol- 
lowing signs and encourage participants to 
report such symptoms themselves: (a) 
breathlessness, rapid pounding heart, or ex- 
treme weakness or shakiness that lasts for 
more than ten minutes after exercise; (b) 
broken sleep or unusual restlessness during 
the night following strenuous exercise; or 
(c) a definite sense of fatigue that holds 
over through the next day. When such signs 
oi- symptoms are reported by the player or 
observed by the coach or leader, referral to 
a physician for careful examination is in 
order. — National Federation and A.M.A. 



The OFFICIAL SPORTS FILM SERVICE 
has concluded plans for the filming of a new 
picture, "Official Football." "Official Foot- 
ball" was filmed at Municipal Stadium. Albu- 
querque, New Mexico, with the nlaving per- 
sonnel selected from Hio^hland High School. 
Scenes were filmed durine the week of Oc- 
tober 19-24. The Football Rules Editorial 
Committee sei*ved as the technical staff with 
the Officials' crew being made up of out- 
standinor Officials coming principally from 
the southwestern area states. The film is to 
show and demonstrate the wide variety of 
play rulings. Sequences will be introduced on 
the basis of the primary responsibilities of 
the various Officials, that is. Referee, Um- 
pire. Field Judge and Head Linesman. 

SUCCESS— 

Success is speaking' words of praise, 

And cheering other people's ways; 

It's doing just the best you can 

With every task and every plan. 

It's silence when your speech would hurt, 

Politeness when your neighbor's curt; 

It's deafness when the scandal flows, 

And sympathy with other's woes. 

It's loyalty when duty calls. 

It's courage when disaster falls, 

It's patience when the hours are long, 

You'll find it in laughter and in song. 

It's in the silent time of prayer, 

In happiness and in despair. 

In All of Life, and nothing- else, 

We find this thing we call Success! 

— Anonymous. 



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v-' 




High Schopi Afhfefe 

St. Xavier's State Championship Cross Country Team It 





(Left to Right) Front Row: James Walsh, Blaine Vetter, John Passafiume, 
Dennis Schnurr, William Conlon, Brian Vetter. Second Row: John Ebert, Robert 
DeSensi, William Arnold, Theodore Gerstle, Joseph Kroh, John Nordmann, Mi- 
chael Wig'ginton. 



in 



f 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

DECEMBER - 1359 



s 



HENDERSON DOUGLAS— CLASS A FINALIST 




(Left to Ri.ht, Front Row: H F^ Bran., Jr Jatnes Hatc.eU Letcher Floyd. ^^^^^^^^ 
Sfa'-ri' H^olriwrrSera^Ko^ :7>;aHt P^^^ 

gr^n' ^tZr/.^^^tT^.nTieLrlt^^^^^^ Hav.an, Boo.er T. .ac.son, Geor.e M.ller. 

Raymond Clements, Charles Chambers, Ernest Jones. 

FORT THOMAS HIGHLANDS-N.K.A.C. CHAMPION AND CLASS AA FINALIST 






-f«i.|» 









'5 .3-.!T»'i9»*» 




Right I Front Row: Roger Walz. Larnr Chap 
•t Phil Chrisman. Ray Stortz. Jim Ulltnan, 
Bob Dziech. Jack Gish, George Lee. Charles 
Leroy Kenrick, Dave Delany. Third Row: 
Ross. Mike First. Bob Steinhauser Bill Gibson, 
„.,„.,i. Roger Simpson. T. Greer, W. Martens, K. 
P Smith. Fifth Row: W. Dailey, W. Faulkner, 

J Connely, W. Goodwin. R. Hill. R. Parrott. R Smith. 

Homer Rke. Owen Hauck, Robert Luecke, Ted Engelhard, 

Heiber, R. Zech. 



I Left t. 
ner. Jim B 
Walt Kellen 
Bill Shively 
McPhail, Jo 
G. Steansha 
Stude 



man, T. Beyersdorfer, John Burt, Tom Hill, Dale Fau^- 
Allin Fulmer. Chuck Taylor. Bill Montfort Second Row. 
Rogers Alan Berry. Richard West, G. Herfel, Buddy Waite, 
yfrn Borches, Bob Hitch, John Hicks, C. R. Lyons Mike 
B Baumgartner, Scott Crooks. Doug Moore. Fourth Row 
Graves K. Reik, Allen Law. F. Kreutzer, D. Fox, i-ete 
M cTinkeAbeard H Rief, F. Parton, J. Flaig, J. Dixon, 
^i-xth"Row''Mgrs. D. Hosea V. Smith, D. Vail : Coaches 
Jay Hauselman, Bernie Sadosky ; Mgrs. A. FirsH &. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXII— NO. 5 



DECEMBER, 1959 



.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions —Installment 1 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 

rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

Play 1: The home team provides an: (a) ap- 
proved composition-covered natural tan; or (b) 
leather-covered orange ball. 

Ruling: The ball in (a) is legal but, unless the 
teams agree to use the orange-colored ball in (b), 
it may not be used. 

Play 2: Jumper Al in center circle taps the 
ball backward where A2, in his back court, bats it 
into his front court, A3 then secures control and 
passes to A2 in the back court. 

Ruling: Violation. Ball is in the back court a 
second time following the jump. 

Play 3: With the score A50 - B50, time expires 
for the fourth quarter of a high school game. While 
the ball is in flight on an unsuccessful try by 
Al, Bl flagrantly fouls A2: (a) before; or (b) after 
basket is made or missed. 

Ruling: In (a) foul is penalized and, if either 
of the free throws is successful, no additional period 
is played. The foul in (b) is a technical foul and an 
extra period will be played, started by adminis- 
tration of the free throws. 

Play 4: During a free throw for personal foul, 
free thrower Al has his foot beyond the vertical 
plane of the free throw line before the ball touches 
the ring or backboard or before , the free throw 
ends. 

Ruling: Violation. Ball becomes dead when 
violation occurs. Unless another attempt is to follow, 
the ball is awarded to B out of bounds at either 
end of the free throw line extended. 

Play 5: After thrower or passer Al jumps and 
before he returns to the floor, Bl moves into his 
path so that he is contacted when Al returns to 
the floor. 

Ruling: Foul by Bl. 

Play 6: Bl, after establishing a legal guarding 
position in the path of dribbler Al. crouches to 
avoid injury from charge by Al. 

Ruling: Foul by Al for charging. After taking 
a legal guarding position, Bl may turn, crouch 
or retreat to avoid injury from a charging dribbler. 

Play 7: Screener Al takes a position so close 
behind Bl, who is stationary and does not have the 
ball, that contact results when Bl turns normally. 

Ruling: Personal foul by Al. When a screener 
takes a position behind a stationary opponent who 
does not have the ball, the opponent must be able 
to take a normal step backward without contact. 
The player being screened from behind is given 
greater latitude of movement than one screened 
from the side or front because he is not expected 
to see the screener. 

Play 8: After Al receives a pass he comes to 



a stop on the count of two with: (a) his feet on a 
line from right to left; or (b) his left foot in ad- 
vance of his right. 

Ruling': Al may legally pivot on either foot in 
(a) but only on his right (or rear) foot in (b). 

Play 9: Al intentionally or accidentally throws 
or bats the ball through either his own or B's 
basket from below. 

Ruling: Ball becomes dead as soon as it enters 
and passes through the basket from below. B will 
throw in from end of court at the spot nearest 
violation. 

Play 10: Al, in the mid-court area and legally 
guarded by Bl, consumes more than 5 seconds in 
a bona fide attempt to advance the ball by dribbling. 

Ruling: There is no violation. Official will not 
start a 5-second count when the dribbler is clearly 
trying to advance the ball. 

Play 11: While an unsuccessful free throw by 
Al is in flight, Bl is in the lane too soon. Before 
the ball is dead B2 pushes A2. 

Ruling: Penalize the infractions in the order 
in which they occur. Al will attempt free throw 
or throws due him (including the substitute throw) 
and the ball will become dead when his last try is 
made or missed. A2 will then be given his throw 
or throws. 

Play 12: Al and Bl jump at center circle. Al 
taps the ball into his front court where it is 
touched but not controlled by A2 and then deflected 
into the back court of A where B3 secures pos- 
session. May B3 cause the ball to go into his back 
court? 

Ruling: B3 may not cause the ball to go into 
his back court because the ball has been there 
prior to B3 securing possession in his front court. 
When A2 touched the ball in his front court (this 
is B's back coui-t) and thereafter B3 gained control 
of the ball in A's back court (this is B's front court), 
B3 could no longer legally return the ball to his 
back court. 

Play 13: Throw-in by Al strikes basket ring. 
While ball is on the cylinder Bl bats it away. 

Ruling: This is basket interference even 
though Bl may have prevented Al from committing 
a violation. In the case cited, two points should 
be awarded team A. 

Play 14: While rebounding, Al secures ball 
and swings his elbows to clear the area in his 
vicinity. Elbow contacts Bl. 

Ruling: Personal foul by Al. 

Play 15: A6 enters game without reporting to 
scorer. After play is resumed and before ball be- 
comes dead, A2 commits personal foul. Scorer then 
calls Referee's attention to failure of A6 to report. 

Ruling: False multiple foul. Free throw or 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



DECEMBER, 1959 VOL. XXII— NO. 5 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsythe (1959-63), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Commlssione'i s (Jffi 



tee 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1959 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Members to the Delegate Assembly at the 
forthcoming 1960 annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion were elected by the principals of K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools on ballots returned to the State 
Office before November 15. There were several ties 
in the voting for delegate and alternate. These ties 
were broken recently, with the delegates or alter- 
nates involved being determined by lot. The names 
of the district representatives are as follows: 
Delegates 

(1) Carlos Lannon, (2) Bradford Mutchler, (3) 
Joe McPherson, (4) M. B. Rogers. (5) Robert Frank- 
lin, (6) Charles .Jenkins, (1) Chester C. Redmon, 
(8> Perry Hill, (9) L. G. Tubbs, (10) Russell Below, 
(11) J. David Bovken, (12) George Claibonne, 
(13) Howard Owens, (14 W. O. Warren. Jr., (15) 
W. M. Martin. (16) Wayne Ewing, (17) C. H. Har- 
ris, 18) Van Washer, (19) James Bazzell, (20) 
Thomas Downing, (21) Billy B. Smith. (22) Robert 
B. Hensley, (23) Paul Ken-ick, (24) Ernest Ruby, 
(25) Robert Clem, (26) Father Jude Cattelona, 
(27) Charlie Bnice, (28) Harry Ludwig, (29) C. L. 
Francis, (30) Arnold Thurman. (31) Bob Hehl, (32) 
M. J. Belew, (33) R. S. Hinsdale. (34) Dan L. Sulli- 
van, (35> James L. Cobb. (36) Richard D. Hehman. 
(37) William L. Mills, (.38) Cecil Hellard, (39) Joe 
A. Simons, (40) Tebav Rose, (41) F. D. Wilkinson, 
(42) Amos Black, (43) John Heber, (44) Rodney 
Brewer, (45) Donald Lamb, (46) Jack Johnson, 
(47) J. B. Albright, (48) Holbert Hodges, (49) Jen-y 
Hacker. (50) HaiTy J. Taylor, (51) James A. Pursi- 
full. (52) Lee Jones, (53) Henry E. Wright. (54) 
H. M. Wesley, (55) Morton Combs, (56) Jimmy 
Holland, (,57) Arthur Mullins, (58) Bill Goble, Jr.. 
(59) Jim Chandler. (60) Leonard Marshall, (61) 
Letcher Norton, (62) Warren Cooper, (63) Ollie 
Adams, (64) Thomas Sammons. 

Alternates 

(1) James Phillips, (2) Richard Winebarger, (3) 



C. W. Jones, (4) Ty Holland, (5) Ercel Little, (6) 
Earl Adkins, (7) Clovis Wallis, (8) Robert Bush, 
(9) William Birdwell, (10) Lewis Johnson, (11) 
Paul Phillips, (12) L. L. McGinnis, (13) Jack Wil- 
liamson, (14) Jackie Day, (15) Earl Reid, 
(16) Charles Fades, (17) John Price, (18) Ralph 
Sharpe, (19) T. C. Simmons, (20) John Marrs, (21) 
John Burr, (22) Ralph Dorsey, (23) H. L. Perkins, 
(24) Vincent Zachem, (25) Joseph Curtsinger, (26) 
Father Ronan Lee, (27) W. K. Niman, (28) John 
Trapp, (29) Samuel Smith, (30) Walter Gilliard, 
(31) Al Prewitt, (32) Cyrus Green, (33) Richard 
Bezold (34) Robert Naber, (35) Stan Arnzen, (36) 
Lawrence Kinney, (37) Joe Anderson, (38) Richard 
Gulick, (39) Elza Whalen, (40) Bill Leedy, (41) 0. 
C. Leathers, (42) Forest Sale, (43) Gene Huff, 
(44) Litton Singleton, (45) Coy Dyehouse, (46) 
John D. Gooch, (47) John Hol'brook (48) Clark 
Chestnut, (40) Jack Powell, (50) H. D. Tye, (51) 
Shelby Fuson, (52) Kendall Boggs, (53) Roy Reasor, 
(54) Paul Colwell, (55) Fairce 0. Woods, (56) 
A. M. Ritchie, (57) Landon Hunt, (58) Don Wallen, 
(59) Wendel Wallen, (60) Len Stiner, (61) Robert 
Haggard, (62) John Allen, (63) Harold King, (64) 
Jake Bowling. 



State Tournament Information 

The 1960 State High School Basketball Tourna- 
ment will be held in Freedom Hall, Louisville, on 
March 16-19. The first session is scheduled for 
Wednesday night. Three sessions will be held on 
Thursday, two on Friday and two on Saturday. 

At some time in the month of December the 
Commissioner will send K.H.S.A.A. member schools 
forms which may be used in requesting passes to 
the tournament. These forms may be returned on 
and after January 4. 

Complete sets of tickets are priced at $8.00 (end 
bleacher seats), $16.00 (chair back seats and end 
box seats), anci $20.00 (box seats at the side of 
the floor). The general sale of tickets (not school 
orders) will be conducted by State Tournament 
Ticket Sales, P. O. Box 1173, Lexington. These or- 
ders should not be placed before January 25. The 
amount of 25c should be added to each remittance 
(not school orders) to pay for postage and insur- 
ance charges. Orders mailed prior to January 25 
will receive a lower priority than those mailed on 
that date. 

Hotels, motels, and other lodging places in 
the Louisville area will begin taking reservations 
after the first of the year. The Housing Bureau 
of the Louisville Chamber of Commerce will assist 
in securing rooms for those who are unable to get 
lodging by writing directly to the places of their 
preference. Such requests should be addressed to 
Mr. Lew Tinsley, Louisville Chamber of Commerce, 
Louisville, Kentucky. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



Page Three 



OLD KENTUCKY HOME— REGION II CLASS A CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Ass't Coach Graham, Decker Taylor, Fiedler, Bowman. P. O'Bryan, Culver, J. 
Edelen, Ditto, Coach Talley. Second Row: D, O'Bryan, T. Hibbs, Pugh, M. Edelen, Keeling, Gaslin, Sympson, J. 
Hibbs, Carter, T. Schaifner, Florence, E. Edelen. Third Row : Breeden. White, Gilpin, Brashear, Fryrear, U. Schaff- 
ner, Greenwell, Barnes, Stansbury, Brewer. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 



Pine Mountain 
St. Patrick 

(Maysville) 



Christian County 

(Hopkinsville) 
Lone Oak 
Nicholas County 

(Carlisle) 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List compiled December 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Babbage, Don, 11000 Grafton Hall Road, Valley Station, WE 

7-5977, JU 2-3859 
Barker, Bob R., 510 Middletown Ave., Ashland, 4-7337, 5-2050 
Bartley, James Gale, Route 3, Slaughters, TU 4-2952, TU 4-2952 
Berry, William, 1633 Jackson Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 

3-6765 
Bishop, David G., Decoursey Pike, Morning View, FL 7-2320, 

HE 1-4900 
Blackburn, Adrian, 413 Scott Ct., Prestonsburg, 2401 
Blackburn, Clyde W., Box 26, London, 620-X, 675 
Burris, John F., Jr., 14-B Dixon Apts., Henderson, VA 7-1184 
Butcher, Paul, Pikeville, GE 7-7529, GE 7-9145 
Butler, Donald A., 2505 Iroquois Drive, Owensboro, MU 3-3175 
Buzzerio, Larry, 1403 Hughes, Murray 
Campbell, John, Jr., Garrett, 5521, 3461 
Cantrell, Hubert Edward, Campton 

Cassady, Charles W., 1127 Kentucky, Bowling Green, VI 3-9538 
Gathers, Bob, P. O. Box 158, Corbin, 1338, 561 or 1195 
Caudill, Gary A., 227 High St., Pikeville, GE 7-4909 
Cha.idler, J. Dan, Elm St., Versailles, 2-1858 Lexington, 

(Bus. No.) 
Clark, Joseph W., 1124 Adams St., Bowling Green, VI 2-1216 
Clark, Owen B., Route 1, Georgetown 
Connell, Charles Edward, 1219 West Main, Box 102, Shelbyville, 

ME 3-2447 
Cossey, James Z., P. O. Box 67, Cadiz. LA 2-8146 
Coyle, Ernest T., Leader Sports Dept., Lexington, 2-2270 

(Bus. No.) 



Cox, Ralph, Benham, 2136 

Craft, Bill, 638 Longview Dr. Lexington, 7-4843, 5-0160 

Crase, Arvil, College Post Office Box 453, Berea, 9128 

Crace, Harold, Falcon, 9-4718 

Current, Ellis R., 1933 Bellefonte Dr., Lexington, 7-1049, 

5-4660 
Dawson, Ray. Revelo 

Davenport, Robert B., P. O. Box 31. Burgin, 5204, 5180 
Dieterle, Owen M., 907 W. 2nd Street, Owensboro, MU 3-7610, 
Dick, Larry Eugene, P. O. Box 25, Science Hill, 1 
Draughn, Bartram, Hindman, ST 5-4845 
Duerson, William Robert, Box 480, Lancaster, 612-R 
Duff, Birchell. Garrett 
Duncan, Earl S., 10,007 Taylorsville Rd., Jeffersontown, AN 

7-1478, TW 5-0567 
Earle, Herscliel G., Berry 
Early, Robert G., Bagdad, SH 7-8401 
Elmore, Jimmj A., 624 Stewart St., Elizabethtown, RO 5-9019, 

RO 5-6177 
Embry, Dr. Chalmer P., 1518 Stop n' Shop Ct., Owensboro, 

MU 3-2131, MU 3-3214 
Flynn. Alton, 632 Cantrill, Irvine. 261-J, 56 
Ford, Gary P., Box 864. Austin Peay State College, Clarksville, 

Tennessee, Ashland City SW 2-4186 
Fulkerson, Raymond, 9212 Cornflower, Valley Station, WE 

7-4158, ME 7-1477 
Gee, Edgar. Sr., Route 4, Shelbyville, ME 3-2500 
Gleason, George T., 1500 High St., Bowling Green, VI 2-7316 
Gleason, William, 1315i/> Chestnut St., Bowling Green, VI 

2-2180, VI 2-2180 
Godbey, Truman, Middleburg, SU 7-4013, SU 7-2852 
Goetz, Larry C., 120 Front St., New Richmond, Ohio, EL 

2-7701, BL 2-7703 
Goodin, Charles L., 215 Summitt Dr., Pineville, ED 7-2365, 

ED 7-2151 
Goranflo. R. E., 705 Wayside, Middletown, CH 5-8711, CH 5-4161 
Green, Jerry, 431 Bamberger Rd., Lexington, 3-1566 
Hale, John, Route 1, Box 118. Baxter, 2131. 4-W 
Hamilton, Walter F., 434 Bauer. Louisville, TW 3-5172 
Hamm, Harold D., Route 1. Frankfort. CA 7-! 
Harris, Jack D., 421 Second St., Pi 
Hayes, Adrian, 72 Colonial Ct.. Ov 
Head, Elmo C, 113 Alton Rd.. S 

3-1750 
Heath. Lary D., 342 Dudley Rd., Lexington, 6-1819, or 3-2 
Hertzberger, Robert H., 2735 Marion, Evansville, India 

HA 4-1681, HA 6-5211, Traffice Office 
Hobbs, Charles V., 627 Westview Dr., Westwood, Ashla 

EA 4-9439, EA 4-2176 



Ed 7-3490 

ME 3-4220, ME 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



Hoffeld, Bernie Edward, 172 Rugby Rd., Lexington, 3-0617, 

2-2250, Ext. 3329 
Howard Henry D., Kettle Island, ED 7-2996, Middlesboro 14 
Hunter, Charles, P. O. Box 443, Evarts, 642, 77 
Hynson Frederic R., 247 Delmar, Lexington, 5-4169, 5-4159 
Jefferson, Charles R., Perry, Elkton, 5-2285, 6-2456 
Johnson, James M., 8 Felmer Ct., Frankfort, 3-3973, 7-7822 
Johnson, Ralph, Tennessee Ave., Pineville 
Jordan, Larry A., 1917 Clifton, Paris, 1081-R, 1429 
Keeton, C. E. "Buck", Box 9158. Nashville, Tennessee, Cy 

8-5604 (Bus. No.) 
Kercher Norman L., 2505 Proctor Knott, Louisville, GL 2-2969 
Lambert, Irvin, 5110 Rural, Louisville, NO 9-4718, GL 8-6671 
Laskey, George O.. Box 102, Williamstown, TA 3-2041, TA 

3-2041 
Lee, William A., Wallins Creek, Morris 4-3413 
Lehkamp, Kenneth, 749 S. Ft. Thomas, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-1475, 

MY 7-8181 
LeQuire, H. M., Box 863, Harlan, 1123, 193 
McBride, Donald R., 1663 Strader Dr., Lexington, 5-2153 
McClaskey, Booker, Boston, TE 3-4725, 4-4916, Ft. Knox 
McCluro. William S., 220 W. 5th Street, London, VO 4-5669, 

VO 4-2265, or VO 4-5166 
Martin, Wilfred, Route 2, Williamstown, TA 3-1452 
Marks Howard R., Jr., 2425 S. York Street, Owensboro, 

MU 3-;.543, RE 3-4421 
Meiman, William, 1700 Deer Park, Louisville, HI 7-131W, 

JU 7-6897 
Meyer, LeRoy C, 732 Logan, Louisville, JU 7-6351, ME 7-3611, 

Ext. 261 
Middleton, Johnny, Route 1, Berea 
Minton, Eugene. ilOy Loeb &t., Henderson 
Moore. Ballard J., 405 Woodland, Lexington, 4-8252 
Mullms, Ben H., 3J0 High St., Jenkins, 865, 107 
Myers, Lee E , Big Stone Gap, Va. 

Newsom Lawrence. 1949 Bellefonte, Lexington, 7-3060, 4-9116 
Norvell Glover H., Jr., 464 Carlisle, Lexington, 3-3075, 2-2626 
O'Nan, Eugene, Route 3, Henderson, 7-9077, 6-9223 
Pack James Warren, Route 1, Box 26. Catlettsburg, Park 253 
Peters, Harold Dean. Barbourville, Union College 
Pierce, Ray O., 917 Oak Hill Rd., Evansville, Ind., 3-0464, 

4-7741 „ „ 

Frail, John A., Box 204, O'Donnell Hall, Eastern State College, 

Richmond „ 

Pursifull Cleophus, 808 Dorchester, Middlesboro, 2208, Bell 

Co. H. S. 
Rains, Richard, Kenvir, 1792 Evarts 

Raisor, J. R., 990 Fredericksburg Rd., Lexington, 7-1043, 4-0304 
Raitt William C, 2631 Bremont Ave., Cincinnati 12, Ohio, 

RE 1-6378, CH 1-7600 
Ratliff, Jerry R., 16th Street, Williamsburg 
Ray Malcolm, 838 Magnolia, Bowling Green, VI 3-9406 
Reece, Ralph, Edmonton, GE 2-2713, GA 2-2131 
Reed William F., 329 Mentelle Park, Lexington, 6-4768, 2-4363 
Ricketts, Claude O., 10217 Starlight Way, Valley Station, 

WA 1-9683, ME 4-1551, Ext. 220 
Riffe James. 1122 Columbia St., Newport, AX 1-4811, Ex 

6-9900, Ext. 1626 
Roark, Van V., Linefork 
Rocke, James M., 10 Lewis Circle, Erlanger, DI 1-9082, 

AX 1-2523 
Rose, Wallace C, 623 Southridge, Lexington, 2-7265, 2-0515 
Rothfuss, Richard. 37 Gregory Lane, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-9190, 

HE 1-6990 
Salyers, Gobel, Elkhorn City 
Saunders, H. Donald, 4729 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, EA 5-2607, 

EA 4-1111, Est. 684 
Settle, Evan, Shelbyville, ME 3-1847, ME 3-4869 
Shackelford, Roscoe, 711 E. Main St., Hazard, GE 6-3467, 

GE 6-3711 
Simms, Wavelan J.. Jr., 60th Station Hospital, APO 266, 

New York, New York, 
Slucher, Kenneth W., Route 1, Shelbyville, SH 7-8800, Simp- 

sonville 2120 
Smith Aubrey. 522 N. Cave, Princeton, 2158. 2158 
Smith, Leonard P. O. Box 1404 Albany 75 (Bus. No.) 
Smith, ,Mark D., Route 2, Sadieville, 4113, Sadieville, 1600, 

Georgetown 
Smith. Wayne N., 317 N. Cross St.. Springfield, 2217, 4058 
Sowder, Donald M., P. O. Box 76. Kevil, HO 2-6866 
Steinke, Donald F., 8"01 Granville Lane, Cincinnati 24, Ohio, 

JA 2-2366, RI 1-9646 
Stephenson, Harry, 2210 Circle Dr.. Lexington. 4-9620, 4-2431 
Stidham, Jennis, Transylvania College, Lexingto' 
Sutton, Ronnie N., 1509 Chestnut, tiowling Green 3-9408 
Swann, John W., Jr.. 3 Reynolds Dr.. Owensboro, MU 3-0331 
Taylor, Ed, 436 No. 4l3t Street, Louisville 12, SP 2-0126, 

JU 7-6626 
Taylor. James R.. 5051/. East Third, Lexington 
Todd, W. O., Jr., Route 3. Eubank. 370, (Bus. No.) 
Tucker. Lloyd D., 110 Lincoln, Somerset, 841-W (Bus. No. I 
Urlage Richard Charles 822 Highland Ave., Ft. Thomas. HI 

1-5613, OR 1-8120 
VanWinkle, Steve, 619 Martha Ave., Jeffersonville, Ind.. Bu 

3-7054. Whitehall 5-8223 
Vipperman, Albert, Ransom, GA 7-2810 
Wanchic. Nicholas, USPHS Hospital, Lexington, 5-1233 
Ware, Phillip C, 624 7th St., Henderson, VA 6-4814 



•ille, SP 



-2944, 



Weathers, Charles, Jr., 3620 Grand, 

BU 3-3511, Ext. 3163 
Webb, Lonard H., Sweeden, 4 (Bus. No.) 

Wenz, Marvin L., 3226 Utah Ave., Box 15, Louisville, EM 8-8162 
Whitham, M/Sgt. Challenger. Jr., 3028-C. Ft. Campbell, 

4538, 3320 
Wilcox, Ursal R., Auxier, 3329, 4411 
Will, Chuck, 619 Silkwood Ave., Madisonville, TA 1-3252 

(Bus. No.) 
Willis. Jack W., Route 1, Corbin, 464, 454 

Wilson, Jack R., 617 W. Main, Morehead, ST 4-5524, ST 4-4136 
Withrow. Roy D.. 424 Res. Ave., Central City, 742-W, 9 
Wolf, J. F., 1070 Shangrila Dr., C;nc;nnati 33, Ohio, BE 

1-2319, MA 1-4300 
Yeargain, Ray Lynn, College Station, Box 799. Murray 



The 1959 Cross Country 

The St. Xavier High School of Louisville won 
the seventh official K.H.S.A.A. Cross Country Run, 
which was held in Lexin,o-ton on November 14. The 
team score was 65. First place was won by Joseph 
Kroh of St. Xavier, with the time of 10:35. The 
St. Xavier team was coached by Brother Brennan. 

Scores of the fifteen full teams which qualified 
for the state run were as follows: St. Xavier, 65; 
Trinity, 103; Butler, 123; Waggener, 129; Greens- 
burg, 153; Johns Creek, 178; Montgomery Co., 219; 
Glendale, 227; Elizabethtown, 273; Trimble County, 
286; Berea Foundation, 305; Bagdad, 327; High- 
lands, 338; Camargo, 348; Paducah Tilghman, 431. 

The State Cross Country Run was held on the 
Picadome Golf Course, and was managed by the 
Spiked Shoe Society of the University of Kentucky. 
Officers of the Society are: Harry T. Starns, Presi- 
dent and Treasurer; E. G. Plummer, Vice President; 
Press Whelan, Secretary. Activities of the Society 
are supervised by Dr. Don Cash Seaton, Head of 
the Department of Physical Education and Track 
Coach at the University of Kentucky. 

Seven regional runs had been held on October 
31 for the purpose of qualifying teams and indivi- 
duals for the state event. These runs were held 
at Paducah, Bowling Green, Clarkson, Louisville, 
Bellevue, Berea, and Paintsville. In addition to 
the teams, several individual runners qualified as 
entrants for the state affair. 

One hundred twelve boys took part in the 
State Cross Country Run. The order in which the 
first fifty finished is given below, including the 
times. 

1-Kroh, St. Xavier (10:35); 2-Owens, Trinity 
(10:39); 3-Banks, Elizabethtown (10:48); 4-Gerstle, 
St. Xavier (10:49); 5-Johnson, Trimble Co. (10:52); 
6-Matlock, Butler (10:53); 7-Mathis, Waggener 
(10:55); 8-White, Waggener (10:56); 9-Cunning- 
hani. Trinity (10:58); 10-Howard, Johns Creek 
(10:59); 11-Edmonds, Johns Creek (11:00); 12- 
Passafiume, St. Xavier (11:04); 13-Lewis, Berea 
Found. (11.05); 14-Hudson, Knox Central (11:05); 
15-Bealmear, Trinity (11:12); 16-Castle, Flat Gap 
(11:13); 17-Havens, Montgomery Co. (11:13); 18- 
McMahan, Greensburg (11:16); 19-Turrel, Waggener 
(11:18); 20-Houk, Greensburg (11:20); 21-Crawley, 
Butler (11:20); 22-Esteepp, Flat Gap (11:21); 23- 
Vetter, St. Xavier (11:21); 24-Elliott, Butler 
(11:24); 25-Conlon, St; Xavier (11:26); 26-Jerry, 
Trimble Co. (11:26); 59-Jaggers, Glendale (11:27); 
28-Helvey, Johns Creek (11:28); 29-McKenzie, Flat 
Gap (11:28); 30-Foster, Greensburg (11:29); 31- 
Hicks, Glendale (11:30); 32-Fish, Butler (11:31); 
33-Miller, Highlands (11:32); 34-Cunningham, Trin- 
ity (11:32); 35-Nichols, Berea Found. (11:36); 36- 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



Page Five 



HAZARD— E.K.M.C. AND REGION IV CLASS AA CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: A. J. Davis. Thomas Turner. J. Davis, Burklow, Turpin, Joseph, Davidson, 
Patrick, Smyly, B. Green. Second Row: Mgr. Hall, Basey, Fonts, Lindon, S. "Williams, C. Cox, Caudill, Ni 
Williams, A. Panky, Nolan. Third Row: Mgr. Burns. Pigman, Bailey, Philon, P. Cox, Farler, McGoughey, Si 
Fitzpatrick, C. Panky, Collins, Fourth Row: Mgr. Smith, Kidd, Cannon, Boyd, C. Begley, N. Green, W. 
K. Fitzpatrick, Stacy, Vermillion, 



McKELL— NORTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Flannery, J. James, Greenslate, Hayden, Spears. Chaffin, Tolliver, Carver, Lowden- 
baek, Collins, J. Lewis. Second Row : Watson, Jr. Rowe, V. Rowe, P. Bentley, Smith, Reynolds, P. Adkins. M. Lewis, 
McQueston, J. Wagner, B. Wagner, Sexton, Riggs. -Third Row: Coach Stephens, T. James, Royster, G. Hardin, G. 
Bentley, Cook, Howard, Stone, Palmer, Franz, Willis. Sammons, J. Hardin, Coach Moore. Fourth Row: Coach Bruce, 
Johnson, Stephens, Callihan, D. Hardin, Osborne, F. Adkins, Gilliam, Dupuy, Vanover, Collier, Bush. 

MT. STERLING— REGION III CLASS A CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: M. Kash. S. Kash, Manuel, Calvert. Richards, R. Lansdale, West. Bryant. Reynolds. 
Second Row: Gibbs, Bailey, J. Scott. J. Lansdale. Fawns, Brooks, Clarke. Littleton, C. Ishmael. Third Row: Mc- 
Carty, King, Montjoy, D. Ishmael, Gatewood. Humphreys, Reid, McFadden, Whitaker. Fourth Row : Evans, Terry* 
Keith, Botts, Justice, C. Lansdale, Manley, R. Scott, Richardson, Ross. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



The Flying Dutchman 

It's basketball time again and time to rule on 
early season play situations which have already 
come in. Attach the following to your basketball 
case books as official: 

PLAY: Post player Al frequently reaches be- 
hind himself to contact Bl so that Al knows how 
Bl is playing him. 

RULING: Personal foul. The rules state: "He 
shall not contact an opponent with his hand unless 
such contact is only with the opponent's hand while 
it is on the ball and is incidental to an attempt 
to play the ball." 

PLAY: Al commits his fifth personal foul but 
before official or scorers notify him a substitute 
takes his place in the game. Later, Al enters the 
game again and, after participating, the scorer 
notes that Al has five personal fouls and so notifies 
the official. 

RULING: Technical foul. 

PLAY: Team A gets the opening tip and it.s 
five players line up across the floor near the ten- 
second line. Team A makes no effort to move the 
ball in for a score. Bl and B2 enter the front court 
area and make a bona fide attempt to secure pos- 
session of the ball. Since there is no score and the 
defense is responsible for action, do Bl and B2 pro- 
vide the necessary opposition or must more than 
two defensive men come into the front area? 

RULING: Two defensive men in the mid-court 
area satisfy the requirements of the rule. 

Joe Creason, Sunday Magazine writer of the 
Courier-Journal, presented an excellent pictorial 
story teaching the public how the new charging 
rule will be called. The Commonwealth owes a debt 
of gratitude to Joe for his interest in educating 
the fans so that they may criticize officiating ob- 
jectively and intelligently. This story appeared 
November 15. 

Kentucky's football officiating gets quite a 
boost in recognition every time far away places 
bring arbiters from Kentucky to officiate their 
games. Dave Longenecker and Jack Howerton 
brought such recognition to Kentucky a few years 
ago when they officiated the Sun Bowl game in 
El Paso. Now Dave has done it again. A week ago 
he was flown to Denton, Texas, and paid a pile of 
money to officiate a football game there. These 
things reflect credit on Kentuckys officiating. 

Hardin McLane, Athletic Director and Basket- 
ball Coach of Elizabethtown Catholic High School, 
reflects the same kind of credit from a coaching 
angle in a different way. Many officials point out 
the business-like way in which Hardin operates. 
Prior to each game the officials get a letter telling 
them their fee, enclosing the schedule with an in- 
vitation to attend Elizabethtown Catholic home 
games at any time as a guest of the school. The 
letter also states that the school will do everything 
possible to make the official's game pleasant and 
the relations enjoyable. Such coach and official 
relationship should be widely copied for the good 
of basketball. 

Our old friend. Earl Roberts, who served Science 
Hill as Superintendent for many years has moved 
over to Bellevue Elementary School in Richmond 
and is Principal. Earl is one of the finest chaps 




•'|f:#/^«9 



The Dutchman 

in sporting circles in the Commonwealth. Wherever 
he goes he will make a host of friends. 

A card has come from Joe Gilly, one of the 
best coaches the mountains has ever had. Joe has 
moved from Harlan to Clinton, Maryland, where he 
is teaching in a Junior High School. Joe says he 
misses the boys and the joy he had on the foot- 
ball field and in the gymnasium. Joe doesn't miss 
Kentucky nearly as much as Kentucky misses him. 
Certainly, the mountains will never seem the same 
to the Dutchman until Joe comes back. 

From Romulus Gibson comes praise for the 
schools of Munfordville, Somerset, and Wayne 
County. Romulus calls for an Abou Ben Adhem 
certificate to go to those institutions. They are 
on the way. .That was Rom's last official act be- 
fore leaving Kentucky for Florida where he is 
racking up another enviable officiating reputation. 

Coach Wayne Willson of Clay High School has 
called the Dutchman's attention to the fact that two 
high school coaches received a perfect sportsman- 
ship rating last season. They are Morton Combs 
and Letcher Norton. Wayne says that he does not 
know either of these coaches but that his hat is off 
to them for their excellent job of teaching sports- 
manship. We agree with Coach Willson that these 
gentlemen have set a goal for other coaches to 
attain. 

The Corn Cob Pipe Award goes to Frankfort's 
Jack Taylor. Jack has done more for little boys in 
the field of sports without any thought of pay or 
compensation than anybody else we know of. No- 
body could be more deserving of the Flying Dutch- 
man Award than Jack. May his tribe increase! 

About the Mr. Methuselah of basketball officials, 
joining John Heldman and Jack Thompson this 
month for the honor of being in officiating longer 
than anybody else is Georgetown's John Showalter 
and Ashland's Ernie Chattin. Send the Dutchman 
your nomination. 

Now here is our closing philolsophy: A man 
doesn't become bad all at once — he sort of gradually 
sours, like milk. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



Page Seven 



ST. JOSEPH PREP— MID-KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 






SI*^10^33^3P^' 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Pateira. Mclntyre. 
Holtz. Second Row: Detroy. Hite, Talbott, Guerin. Burger 
Perry. Third Row: Ass't Coach Dykal. Barber, Boldrick, 
Dornbaggen, Miles, Rennert, Gondolfo, Conlin, J. Schef£ler 



Fitzgerald, Bohn, Grundy, Kurtz, Schultz, Frigge, Carrico, 
Koltak, Thornburg, Day. Weidlocher, Herschede, Coach 
D. Sheff ler, Grigsby. Co-captains Hayden, Coleman ; 
Ass"t Coach Brother Giles, C.F.X. 



DANVILLE— CENTRAL KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Co-Captains. Rankin, E. Jackson. Second Row: Kauffman, Cox, Wilder, J. Durham, 
G. Ross, Wise, Hoffmeyer, Evans, T. Preston, Gordon, Leigh D. Durham. Third Row: Hayes, C. Caldwell, Bowling, 
Gibson, Sallee, Mace, TuUv, Frankes, Howard, Spivey, Seltsam. Fourth Row : Robinson. H. Jackson, Guttery, 
Swain, Wooldridge, Sanders, R. Ross, Hainsworth, Brown, Selby, T. Caldwell, Vang. Fifth Row : Mgrs. Robertson, 
Bailey, Jones, Boyd, Bibb, J. Jackson, Edwards, J. Preston, Gideon, Miller, Tnr. Horn. 

PERRYVILLE— BLUESRASS EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Kneeling in front, Mascot Tommy Mills. Front Row: Moore, Reynolds, Yankey, Glassock, Hilliard, 
Baker, Bradley, Mgr, J. Gentry. Second Row: Coach Mills, Carey, J. Hundley, Butler, Logue, Cheatham, Co-Captain 
K. Hundley, Bricken, Capt. Jackson, Casey, Ass't Coach J. B. Gentry. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



SOMERSET— REGION II CLASS A CHAMPION 




(Left to R:gbt) Front Row: C. Wilson, R. Anderson, Lon^. 
Stewart. Second Row: W. Wilson, T. Coffey, Garrett, Cain, 
Third Row: Ass't Coach Johns, Crilder. Crockett, Godby, Garnei 
Coach Williams. Fourth Row: Stringer. P. Wilson, Edwards, , 



Iriswell, Dick, P. Hines, Bourne. Evens. Gillespi, 
. Coffey. Reesor. Elinor, Stevens, L. Anderson. 
Baker, B. Smith, Losey, Massengok, N, Smith, 
Hines. Berry, Maguire, Thompson, Combs, Waddle. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
throws for personal is attempted first and then 
followed by the attempt resulting from the technical 
foul. Ball is put in play as after any technical foul. 

Play 16: Bl pushes Al. Al then kicks at Bl 
but his foot does not make contact. 

Ruling: False double foul. Bl is charged with 
a personal foul and Al with a technical. Free 
throws are awarded since this is not a double foul. 
A jump at center follows the last of the free throws. 

Play 17: Al and Bl foul each other simultan- 
eously (double foul) and at the same instant B2 
fouls A2. 

Ruling: This combination constitutes a false 
double foul, one of the elements being a double foul. 
No free throws are awarded for the double foul. 
The free throw or throws resulting from the foul 
by B2 are awarded to A2. The ball becomes dead 
after the last free throw try by A2 and is then put 
in play by jump ball at center between any two 
opponents. 

Play 18: In a high school game the first extra 
period ends in a tie. In the second extra period: (a) 
team A scores one point and team B then scores a 
field goal; or (b) both teams A and B score one point 
and the second period ends in a tie. In the third 
extra period team A scores one point. 

Ruling: In (a) the game ends when B scores 
a field goal. In (b) as soon as team A scores the 
point in the third period the game ends. In (b) 
team A is the first team to score two points after 
the end of the first extra period. 

Play 19: When does a sudden-end rule go into 
effect ? 

Ruling: The sudden-end rule goes into effect 
when the first overtime period ends in a tie. That 
is, the first team to score two points under con- 
ditions provided in rule 5-7 after the beginning of 
the second overtime period wins the game. 

Play 20: During the second overtime, with the 
score A50 - B51, Al fouls Bl after field goal try 



by Al is in flight. The field goal is successful. 

Ruling: The successful field goal makes the 
score A52 - B51. B is entitled to a free throw or 
throws. If B scores two free throws it would win 
52 to 53. If B scores one free throw, the game 
would be tied and continue until either team scored 
an additonal point, thereby becoming the winner. 
If B does not score a free throw A wins 52 to 51. 

Play 21: On free throw by Al, Bl is in the 
first space and A2 in the second space. Is it legal 
for A2 to leave his space as soon as the ball is in 
flight and may he move into the 4-foot space behind 
the plane of the backboard? 

Ruling: A2 may leave his space after ball is 
in flight but he may not enter the first space until 
the ball has touched the ring or backboard or the 
free throw has ended. The first space is 7 feet in 
length and about 3 feet in depth. Hence, A2 must 
be at least 3 feet from the lane until the ball 
touches. 

Play 22: Al attempts a single free throw at 
B's basket. Try is successful. Throw-in by Bl is 
taken by B2 who throws the ball in his basket. 
Attention is called to the error just prior to throw- 
in by Al. 

Ruling: The first live ball following the try 
started when B2 touched the throw-in. This live 
ball ended when field g-oal was scored. Correction 
should be made since error was discovered before 
the second live ball following the try. Free throw 
is cancelled and Al tries at his own basket. Field 
goal by B2 and any elapsed time is not nullified. 

Play 23. Al is awarded a two-throw penalty 
and the throws are attempted at B's basket. The 
first throw is unsuccessful or there is a free throw 
violation by A or it is successful. The second free 
throw is successful and the error is discovered 
after throw-in by B is touched on the court. 

Ruling: An error was made on each of two 
free throws tries. Since ball is dead after first 
throw, regardless of the manner in which it ended, 
the first live ball following the first try begins 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



Page Nine 



MIDDLESBORO— SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Eight) Front Row : Pratt, Burch, Barnes, Ball, Mace, W. Cosby, Loy, Dean, Gr 
Conner, Taylor, Medley, Hover, Lovett, Bobby Buckner, Leonard, Sehumate. -Third Row : 
Herndon, Jones, Long, Schooler, C. Cosby, Hafer. -Fourth Row ; Mgrs. Hickmanf. Roy Pace, 
Hamlett, Hayes, Bill Buckner, Mgrs. Barrett, Raymond Pace. -Fiftn Row: Ass't Coach Terr 



2er. -Second Row: Reece, 
Ledger, Sowder, Littrell, 
Meyers, Fuson, Hamilton, 

11. Coaches Hurst, Storm. 



when the ball is handed to Al for the second try. 
The second live ball starts when the throw-in by 
B is touched on the court. Hence, in the above situa- 
tion, it is too late to correct the error for the first 
try. However, discovery is in time to correct the 
error for the second try at the wrong basket. 

Play 24: Al is awarded a two throw penalty and 
the throws are attempted at B's basket. The first 
throw is unsuccessful or there is a free throw 
violation by A or it is successful. The second throw 
is not successful and the error is discovered after 
Bl has been called for a traveling violation. 

Ruling: First live ball after the error starts 
when the ball is handed to Al for his second try 
and ends with the violation. Hence, the error for 
both tries should be corrected if the discovery is 
before throw-in following the violation is touched 
on the court. 

Play 25. Throw-in by Al is touched but not 
controlled by A2. Ball then lies on floor in the back 
court with no one securing control. 

Ruling: After a reasonable period of time, 
Referee will declare the ball dead. He will av/ard 
it out of bounds to A and direct them to put the 
ball in play and to attempt to advance it. If A 
does not comply with Referee's order, he should 
penalize with a technical foul. 

Play 26: Bl, in guarding Al, holds his hand 
in front of eyes of Al. 

Ruling: Technical foul. It is not the intent of 
the rule to permit Bl to put "blinders" on an op- 
ponent. If, in the situation above, Al moves his 
head so that he can see and the hand of Bl follows 
in front of his eyes, it is an infraction of rule 
10-4-c. 

Play 27: When approximately a minute is left 
in a quarter and with the score tied, Al holds the 



ball in the mid-court area ostensibly for the purpose 
of restricting the action to only one try before the 
time for the period expires. Players of B take a 
deep zone defensive position in the scoring area. 

Ruling: The lack of action provision is applic- 
able at any and all times during the game. In this 
situation B is responsible for action. As soon as 
the Official determines it is an actionless situation, 
he will begin his 30-second count if team B has not 
previously been warned during that period. If a 
warning has been given team B during that quarter, 
the Official will start his 6-second count as soon 
as the time-consuming stiuation is apparent. 

Play 28: Team A gets the opening tip and its 
five players line up across the floor near the 10- 
second line. Team A makes no effort to move the 
ball in for a try. Bl and B2 enter the front court 
area and make a bona fide attempt to secure pos- 
session of the ball. Since there is no score and the 
defense is responsible for action, do Bl and B2 
provide the necessary opposition or must more 
than two defensive men come into the front court 
area ? 

Ruling: The two defensive men in the mid- 
court area satisfy the requirements of the rule. 

Play 29: While behind in score and after being 
warned during the quarter for lack of action, A2 
secures control of a center jump in his mid-court 
area and makes no attempt to advance ball. No 
team B players are in the front court area and 
Official starts 5-second count. After two counts, 
A2 dribbles into back court and remains there for 
approximately nine seconds before returning to 
his front court. 

Ruling: Legal. 

Play 30: What are the jersey numbers which 
are permissible ? 

Ruling: Numbers which comply with the rules 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



CAVERNA— BARREN RIVER EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right! Front Kow : Mgr. B. Doyle, Scott, Reynolds, Banstettev 
Row: Braden, Gentry, B. Strickland, D. Doyle, Grider. Third Row: C 
Strickland, McCubbin, Bobby Wilson, Ass't Coach Bass. 



are: Even - 0, 4, 10, 12, 14, 20, 22, 24, 30, 32, 
34, 40, 42, 44, 50, 52 and 54; Odd - 3, 5, 11, 13, 15, 21, 
23, 25, 31, 33, 35, 41, 43, 45, 51, 53 and 55. It is 
not illegal to use double zero or three digit num- 
bers but they are not recommended. 

Play 31: Referee is ready to start game when 
he discovers one or more players of team A with 
illegal numbers. What is the proper procedure? 

Ruling: A technical foul should be called and 
one free throw, regardless of the number of players 
who have illegal numbers, should be awarded. Also, 
Official has the authority to order the team to 
secure legal numbers. Failure to comply with 
the order should result in one or more additional 
free throws. Whether an order of this kind is 
issued should depend upon circumstances. In most 
cases, it is not practical to require an immediate 
change, since it might cause undue delay and suit- 
able numbers might not be readily available. Official 
should report such incidents to the Conference or 
State Association authorities so that future in- 
cidents will be avoided. 

Play 32: Where is mid-court for purposes of 
a throw-in on a court which has two division lines ? 

Ruling: It is always opposite the center circle, 
regardless of the length of the court. 

Play 33: Post player Al frequently reaches be- 
hind himself to contact his guard, Bl, with his 
hand so that Al knows where Bl is playing him. 

Ruling: Personal foul. The rules state: "He 
shall not contact an opponent with his hand unless 
such contact is only with the opponent's hand while 
it is on the ball and is incidental to an attempt to 
play the ball." 

Play 34: If an Official on his own initiative 
takes a time-out to protect an injured player, should 
a time-out be charged to the team? 



Ruling: Unless the injured player is replaced 
within one and a half minutes or unless the player 
is ready to play immediately, the time-out must be 
charged to the team for whose benefit it was taken. 
After calling the time-out, the Official should ask 
the player if he desires a time-out. If he does not, 
play should be resumed immediately. If, while time 
is out, the coach or trainer has been granted per- 
mission to come onto the court to attend the player, 
the time-out must be charged unless the player is 
removed. Under no circumstances does the Official 
have any authority to charge a time-out to himself. 

Play 35: P'rom behind plane of backboard, (a) 
a throw-in is such that some part of the ball passes 
above the backboard; or (b) a try for field goal is 
such that some part of the ball passes above back- 
board. 

Ruling: If rectangular backboard is used, ball 
remains dead in (a) and becomes dead in (b). If 
fan-shaped backboard is used, ball does not remain 
or become dead. Some groups choose to rule this 
the same as for a fan-shaped backboard for any 
high school game. 

Play 36: What are the points of measurement 
in determining whether or not the player in control 
is closely guarded? 

Ruling: Measurement is from the forward foot 
of the offensive player to the fonvard foot of the 
defensive player. Because the rule specifies "not 
exceeding 6 feet". Officials should be as certain 
as possible that the guard is in therequired distance. 

Play 37: Bl pushes Al while Al is trying for 
a field goal. A2 interferes with the ball on the ring 
or on the cylinder. 

Ruling: The volation by A2 kills the ball. 
Therefore, it is an unsuccessful try and Al is 
awarded two free throws. This is one of the few 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



Page Eleven 



IN MEMORIAM 

WILLIAM ROUSH FUGITT, 61, West Virginia 
Secondary School Activities Commission's greatly 
respected and much loved Executive Secretay, died 
in Beckley, West Virginia on November 3, 1959. 
Mr. Fugitt attended elementary and high school in 
Ironton, Ohio and was graduated from Marshall 
College, Huntington, West Virginia, magna cum 
laude, in 1928. He received his Master's Degree 
from the University of Cincinnati in Philosophy and 
School Administration in 1832. As an undergraduate 
at Marshall, he vsras a member of the Student Coun- 
cil, of the M Letter Club, and viron the President's 
and Interfratemity Award for Scholarship and Ath- 
letics. 

Mr. Fugitt's long and illustrious career began 
as an elementaiy Principal in Miller, Ohio. He then 
taught and coached at Proctorville, Ohio and Dun- 
bar, West Virginia, after which he served for four 
years as high school Principal in Beckley, West 
Virginia. From 1933 to 1937 Mr. Fugitt was Assist- 
ant County Superintendent of Releigh County, West 
Virginia and for the next three years was Manager 
of the Crouch Lumber Company in Beckley. Prom 
1940 to 1946 he was Executive Secretary of the 
Beckley Chamber of Commerce and in 1946 was 
elected to the position of the Executive Secretary of 
the West Virginia Secondary School Activities Com- 
mission, which he held at the time of his death. Mr. 
Fugitt received many honors during his career, 
among them being- President of the Beckley Kiwanis 
Club in 1937, Lt. Governor of the Kiwanis 4th Div- 
isioin in 1937, and Governor of the West Virginia 
District of Kiwanis in 1944. He was Past Command- 
er and Past Adjutant of the American Legion Post 
in Beckley and Chief Counselor of the Mountaineer 
Boys' State since 1945, which is a yearly school of 
citizenship for 400 selected youth. He directed 55 
counselors in this program annually. He was also 
Past State Commander of the American Legion De- 
partment of West Virginia in 1948. From 1949 to 
1951 he was a member of the Council for Veteran's 
Affairs of West Virginia and during 1958 and 1959 
was President of the National Federation of State 
High School Athletic Associations. Mr. Fugitt was 
a member of Kappa Delta Pi, National Honorary 
Education Society; a member of Pi Gamma Mu, 
National Honorary Social Science Society; and a 
member of Phi Delta Kappa, National Honorary 
Scholastic Fraternity. During Mr. Fugitt's ten 
years as Executive Secretai-y, the West Virginia 
High School Athletic Association became the West 
Virginia Activities Commission with the added re- 
sponsibilities for interscholastic competition and 
activities in the state. Under the Activities Com- 
mission, schools were classified for the purposes of 
arranging competition in football and basketball; 
game officials were enrolled with the State Associa- 
tion and a regular program of clinics and rules 
clinics for coaches and officials in all major sports 
was established, thus enlistine the support of game 
officials with the Activities Commission's program. 
Negro schools were integrated in West Virginia and 
accepted to membership in the Activities Commis- 
sion with the minimum of problems; the athletic 
program was expanded to include such activities 
as golf, tennis and vsrestling. Standards were re- 
vised and elevated so that regulations were more in 
accord with the educational principles. The Com- 
mission's By-laws and Constitution are now held 
in high regard and respect by those enisrag-ed in ath- 
letics throughout the State of West Virginia. 

The following is quoted from a West Virginia 



sportswi'iter and is an example of the esteem in 
which Mr. Fugitt was held in his own state. 

"No finer man ever lived. No better Executive 
Secretary ever toiled for any State High School As- 
sociation. No man was more dedicated to the young- 
sters. No businessman paid more attention to every 
little detail. No student ever had as good control 
of the English language. No speaker had as many 
cute storie's to tell from the head table. No one man 
ever drew as much respect, not only across the 
State of West Virginia, but across the entire United 
States. 

"Bill Fugitt was an examplar of the Golden Rule. 
He labored long hours in working out of his huge 
office with myrads of files and countless papers 
doing the bidding of the State Board of Appeals 
set forth in the high school manual government ath- 
letics and other extra cunicular activities in the 
state schools." 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS— Continued 

situations where a foul and a violation occur during 
the same live ball. 

Play 38: Al commits his fifth personal foul 
but, before Officials or Scorer notify him, substi- 
tute takes his place in the game. Later, Al enters 
the game again and, after participating, the Scorer 
notes that Al has five personl fouls and so notifies 
Official. 

Ruling: Technical foul. Al must immediately 
leave the game. 

Play 39: After a successful field goal or free 
throw, Bl and B2 are out of bounds at the end. 
Bl throws to B2 and B2 then passes to B3 on the 
court. Is it illegal for Bl to be out of bounds when 
B2 throws to B3 on the court? 

Ruling: No, if Bl has not purposely delayed 
his return to the court. However, if Bl has inten- 
tionally delayed his return (which would usually 
be for the purpose of deception) Bl has committed 
a technical foul. 

Play 40: Al jumps to make a pass. He sees that 
his pass will be intercepted so he drops ball to the 
floor and dribbles into an unguarded area and then 
shoots and scores a field goal. 

Ruling: Al has committed a running violation 
by starting a dribble illegally. The goal does not 
count and the ball is awarded to an opponent out 
of bounds at the spot nearest the violation. 
COMMENTS ON THE RULES 

BASIC PRINCIPLES: Many decisions result- 
ing- from personal contact have to be based on 
judgment applied on the basis of the following 
principles: 

1. In general, any player is entitled to a nor- 
mal floor position not occupied by an opponent and 
provided he does not cause personal contact when 
taking such position. 

2. Contact does not in itself constitute a foul. 
If it is incidental, it may be no foul has been com- 
mitted. By incidental contact is meant that contact 
which is casual, not desierned. and by which no 
player is placed at a disadvantage. 

3. When a contact foul occurs, the Official must 
determine the player who is responsible. The player 
with the ball is responsible if he charges into the 
body of an opponent who has legally established 
a position to guard him. A player who extends 
his arm is responsible if it impedes the progress 
of an opponent who contacts it. The responsibility 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1959 



^^^ ^UaiJz yo44^... 



We wish to take this opportunity to 
thank you for the response you have 
given us in writing vour ACCIDENT 
INSURANCE on your students and 
athletes. We would like to call to your 
attention that KENTUCKY CEN- 
TRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT IN- 
SURANCE COMPANY also writes 
LIFE INSURANCE AND HOS- 
PITALIZATION. 



KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 




7<4e KUufdei^ Go4nfiaH4f 



W. E. KINGSLEY 
CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 

CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



may be on either player if A trips over the leg of B. 
If the leg is placed in A's path as he attempts to 
pass by, the responsibility is on B. If B has legally 
established a normal basketball position with his 
leg stationary and A trips over it, A is respon- 
sible for the contact. 

4. In screening situations: 

(a) If A takes a position behind and so close 
to stationary opponent B that a contact foul occurs 
when B makes normal body movements, A is pri- 
marily responsible for the foul. If the screener A 
is at the side or in front of his stationary opponent 
B, any distance short of contact is legal. 

(a) If A takes a position in the path of moving 
opponent B, who does not have the ball, so quickly 
that B cannot stop or change direction in time to 
avoid contact, then A is primarily responsible if a 
contact foul occurs. 

INTERPRETATIONS FOR CONTACT SITUA- 
TIONS: The above principles and the following 
comments are authorized by the National Basket- 
ball Committee. They are presented as a guide for 
officials, coaches and players for the purpose of ob- 
taining more uniform and consistent administra- 
tion of games and to develop play with less illegal 
action and fewer fouls. All statements are based 
upon the rules and the Comments on the Rules. 

GUARDING THE DRIBBLER: A guard may 
move into the path of a dribber at any time pro- 
vided he is able to establish a guarding position 
legally. To establish this position, he must be 
facing the dribbler with his feet on the floor. Sub- 



sequently, he may tuiin, crouch or retreat in order 
to avoid injury if he is charged by the dribbler. 

The guard may move to maintain his position 
in the path of the dribbler. If, however, the dribbler 
gets his head and shoulders beyond the guard, he 
must reestablish his position without contact in 
order to be legally in the path of the dribbler. The 
guard may not, after establishing a guarding posi- 
tion in the path of the dribbler, charge toward and 
into him. If the dribbler and his guard are moving 
in parallel paths, neither player may leave his path 
and charge his opponent. 

If the dribbler passes the ball to a teammate 
and then charges into the guard, the dribbler is 
responsible. Once a player establishes a position 
legally, he is not required to move because of sub- 
sequent developments. 



1959 CROSS COUNTRY 

(Continued from Page Four) 

Mullins, Wurtland (11:37); 37-Skaggs, Greensburg 
(11:40); 38-Morris, Berea Found. (11:41); 39-Rein, 
Glendale (11:41); 40-Kirby, Butler (11:42); 41- 
Wigginton, St. Xavier (11:44); 42-Rogers, Bagdad 
(li:4(3); 43— Snawder, Trinity (11:47); 44— Wilson, 
Montgomery Co. (11:48) 45— Pollitt, Waggener 
((11:48); 46— Haddix, Montgomery Co. (11:52); 47- 
Trammell, Bagdad (11:53) 48-Bagby, Greensburg 
(11-56); 49-Fugatt, Camargo (11:56); 50-Walker, 
Waggener (11:57). 



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MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



Sl^perior 

.UTCLIFFE'S^ASKETBALL 

Equipment 



TOURNAMENT BALLS 

No. RSS Rawlings "Seam Sealed" 
Ply-Fused Basketball has been the 
official ball in the State Tournaments 
and will be an official ball for the 
1960 Tourney at Louisville. 

EACH $23 95 

No. 100. I'he famous Spalding 
"Last Bilt" fully molder ball. Official 
ball for any tournament and will be 
one of the official balls sanctioned for 
the 1960 State Tourney at Louisville. 

EACH $23.95 
BASKETBALL GOALS 




No. 260. Schutt "Rigid Build" are 
tops for all college and high school 
use — nothing better. Complete with 
nets— Pair $11.25 

No. 338-H. Playground and Back- 
yard Practice Goals — Full official 
size and heavy weight — complete 

with nets— Pair $4.25 

No. ON 120. Extra Heavy Tourna- 
ment Nets — Pair $3.00 




OUTDOOR or 
PLAYGROUND BALLS 

No. CB 2. The popular Voit Rubber 
Co. official top grade rubber covered 
ball for outdoor use. Not affected 
by cinders, gravel, cement or wet 
weather. For outdoors will outwear 
two or more of even the top grade 
leather balls. EACH $11.75 

No. L B 9. Another rubber cov- 
ered Basketball made by the Voit 
Rubber Co., but the inside carcass is 
not quite so durable as the No. CB 2 
above. EACH $5.25 

CONVERSE BASKETBALL SHOiS 

Nothing finer and these "All-Star" 
shoes are demanded by most of the 
top ranking College and Professional 
teams. 

NO. 9160. Converse "All Star" 

Black Duck Uppers PAIR $7.95 

NO. 9162. Converse "All Star" 

White Duck Uppers PAIR $7.95 

NO. 9350 Converse "Lucky Boy" 
Black Duck Uppers PAIR $5.95 

NO. 9350 Converse "Luckv Boy" 
White Duck Uppers PAIR $5.95 

MISCELLANEOUS 



No. 199 "Magic Fleece' Brand Basketball Sox — 

white wool with cotton reinforcement. PAIR 65c 

No. 155 "Magic Fleece" Sox with Colored Tops: 

Scarlet, Kelly, Royal, Lt. Gold, Purple. Maroon. 

PAIR 80c 

No. 9 Official Basketball Score Book — Spiral wire 

binding— 25 games. EACH 70c 

No. 670 Individuaal Suit Bag — 16 inch length 

—made of heavy leatherette material EACH $2.10 

TROPHIES 





Tournament and individual Trophies in a com- 
plete Price Range— IN STOCK for "at once" ship- 
ment. Write us for catalog showing a complete 
assortment for your selection. 




a^mi 



SUTCLIFFE COMPA 

INCORPORATED 







High School Athkfe 



Class AAA State Champion duPont Manual 



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(Left to Right) Front Row: Horn, Lewis Claris, Wright, Hudson, Dudgeon, King, Hams, 
Brown McPherson, Detrick, Ferriell. Second Row: Mgr. Frank, Burch, Williams, White, Mur- 
rell Lutts, Elberson, Nelson, McCoy, Lemons.Baugh, Mgr. Alster. Third Row: Dryden Bord- 
ers,' Payne, Nally, Kaiser, Harrington, French, Greene, Mumford, Dodson, Warren. Fourth 
Row: Whitehead, R. Taylor, Carter, E. Taylor, Mgr. Priddy. 




Manual 41 — Dixie Heights 7 
Manual 62 — North Vernon (Ind.) 6 
Manual 38— St. Xavier 6 
Manual 33 — Atherton 6 
Manual 19 — Owensboro 7 
Manual 13— Flaget 7 



Manual 13— Trinity 6 

Manual 45 — Tilghman 6 

Manual 39— New Albany (Ind.) 

Manual 47 — Corbin 7 

Manual 62— Male 

Manual 41 — Durrett 14 

(Class AAA-Final) 



Oificial Organ olthe KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
JANUARY - laBD 



HENDERSON— W.K.A.C. AND CLASS AA STATE CHAMPION 



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(J.eft to Kieht) Front Kon : Prince, Glover, Estes, Moss. Hatlev. Kirkwood. Shaver. Cheanev. Moore. Second 

Kow: J. Liles. Rhoads. Schuette. Mitchell, Duncan, Danheiser, Cosby, Ternes, Wheeler. Third Row: Smith. 

Smithart, Brauer, Allen, Combest, Rabcr, Adkins, Briggs, Snider. Fourth Row: T. Liles, Delker, Owens, Rich- 
mond, DeSpain. Guill, Cave, Thomas. 



LYNCH EAST MAIN— CUMBERLAND VALLEY AND CLASS A STATE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Krent Row: Mgrs. McCarthy, Elliott. Second 
Diznev. Mann, Owens, Trammell. Third Row: Coach Miracle. Ass't. 
(Jreer, Webb, Powell Watts, Catching, Griffith, Ass't Coach Bos< 
linuon, PMorek, Wilder, Hoiska, Jenkins, 



V : Beckler, Maverchak, McGeorge, Evans, 
Bch Scott, Flanary, Jackson. Marion, Hillcn. 
Fourth Row: Craiger, Smith, Pierce, Tom- 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXII— NO. 6 



JANUARY, 1960 



$1.00 Per Year 



Commissioner's Message 

Listed in a section of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution 
among other duties of the Commissioner the follow- 
ing appears: (He shall) do everything in his power to 
develop a high type of sportsmanship among schools, 
athletes, and the general public." This is a tall order, 
and a few comments on sportsmanship at this parti- 
cular time of the school year, with the pressure begin- 
ning to mount as the cun-ent basketball season moves 
toward the climactic State Tournament, might be of 
interest to school administrators and coaches. 

Numerous techniques have been used by the 
Commissioner through the years in attempting to com- 
ply with the section of the I'ules mentioned above. 
Some of these are as follows: 

1. Officials have rated various school representa- 
tives on sportsmanship, and these ratings have been 
published in the ATHLETE. 

2. The Sportsman's Creed was formulated by the 
K.H.S.A.A. after an intensive study of the codes of 
ethics which had been adopted by other state associa- 
tions. The Creed has been used as background ma- 
terial in hundreds of assembly programs, athletic ban- 
quets, and gymnasium dedications. Framed copies of 
the Creed hang in scores of Kentucky gyms. 

3. Editorials on sportsmanship have appeared in 
the ATHLETE, including excellent material gleaned 
from publications of other state associations. 

4. The Commissioner's office has worked closely 
with the State Y.M.C.A. and the Kentucky Associa- 
tion of Pep Organization Sponsors (KAPOS) in their 
fine programs for cheerleaders. 

5. Clinic directors and regional representatives 
have worked long and faithfully at the task of im- 
proving officiating, knowing full well that better of- 
ficiating is a partial answer to improved sportsmanship. 

6. Penalties have been imposed on member 
schools under the mandate of By-Law 17, Practice of 
Sportsmanship, when other methods of improving 
sportsmanship have failed. 

We hope and believe that sportsmanship at the 
high school level improves each year. However, we 
present the following cases which have come to our 
attention recently. They have either been closed or are 
under investigation by the Commissioner's office as 
this article is written: 

1. School A is currently under suspension because 
the coach took his team off the floor before the end 
of the game. 

2. The coach of School B was so disturbed by the 
officiating that he made insulting remarks to the of- 
ficials after the game, these remarks being reported 
tc the press. 

3. The conduct of the coach on the bench at 
School C caused one of the officials to write in his 
report: "His team, cheerleaders, and followers con- 
duct themselves in the same manner that he exhibits 
on the bench." 



4. Irate fans at School D had to be restrained 
from attacking one of the officials. Evidence indicates 
that the conduct of the coach may have precipitated 
the trouble. 

•5. The coach at School E did not prevent several 
fans from following the officials into the dressing 
room after the game, where they made sarcastic and 
threatening remarks. 

These cases and possibly others just around the 
corner may well give Kentucky principals food for 
thought. There is no doubt but that "it can happen 
here." Article X of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution reads 
in part: "The principal of each school, in all matters 
pertaining to the athletic relations of his school, is re- 
sponsible to this Association." This might be a good 
time for all administrators and coaches to refresh 
themselves on the statements and implications of 
By-Law 17. 

The amazing thing about troublesome cases, which 
will probably always be with us, human nature being 
what it is, is not that there are so many of them 
but that there are so few. When consideration is 
given to the fact that more than four hundred high 
school basketball games are being played in Ken- 
tucky each week of the current season, the number of 
"peaceful" games appears to be well nigh phenomenal. 
May we offer our congratulations to the hundreds of 
Kentucky administrators and coaches who are work- 
ing effectively at the job of improving the sports- 
manship in their communities. 

One of the finest codes of ethics which has come 
to our attention in recent years is that of the New 
York State High School Athletic Association. The 
administrators and coaches in New York think that 
it is the duty of all concerned with high school ath- 
letics: 

1. To emphasize the proper Ideals of sportsman- 
ship, ethical conduct, and fair play. 

2. To eliminate all possibilities which tend to de- 
stroy the best values of the game. 

3. To stress the values derived from playing the 
game fairly. 

4. To show cordial courtesy to visiting teams and 
officials. 

5. To establish a happy relationship between visit- 
ors and hosts. 

6. To respect the integrity and judgment of sports 
officials. 

7. To achieve a thorough understanding and ac- 
ceptance of the rules of the game and the standards 
of eligibility. 

8. To encourage leadership, use of initiative, and 
good judgment by the players on the team. 

9. To recognize that the purpose of athletics is to 
promote the physical, mental, moral, social, and 
em.otional wellbeing of the individual players. 

10. To remember that an athletic contest is only 
a game — not a matter of life or death for player, 
coach, school, official, fan, community, state, or nation. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



JANUARY, 1960 



VOL. XXII— No. 6 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. Lexington. Ky. 

Entered aa second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones. (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1S58-62) Franklin: Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville: Robert 
P. Fors>-the (1959-63). Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1969-6.3), 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



^rom 



the C< 



ommissionei s 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1959 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



"Approved" and "Certified" Officials 

A large number of K.H.S.A.A. registered officials 
qualified for the advanced rating of "Approved" 
and "Certified" as a result of the National Federa- 
tion basl<etball examination, which was given in 
Kentucliy on December 7, 1959. The "Approved" 
rating does not carry forward from year to year, 
but must be earned each year. After an official has 
received the "Certified" rating, he keeps this rating 
by clinic attendance. Only officials receiving these 
higher ratings are eligible to work in the regional 
tournaments.. Only "Certified" officials, who are 
residents of Kentucky, are eligible to work in the 
State Tournament. 

Basketball Officials who Qualified for advanced 
ratings during the current season are as follows: 



Certified Officials 



Adkins, Raymond C. 
Alexander, Rex 
Baird, Bill 
Baker, James 
Ballard, Jack H. 
Bell, Clarence T. 
Bennett, Bert 
Black, Charles D. 
Blackburn, Clyde W 
Blackburn, Viley 0. 
Bridges, Bennie 
Brizendine, Vic 
Broderick, Carroll 
Brown, Bryant 
Brown, James W. 
Buis, Nathaniel A. 
Casteel, Ralph M. 
Chattin, Charles 
Chumbler, W. W. 



A. 



Coleman, L. J. "Duke" 

Combs, Travis 

Conley, George 

Cooper, John Wellington 

Cooper, Warren 

Craft. Bill 

Crosthewaite, John S., Jr. 

Crutcher, James W. 

Cummins, Al 

Davis, Don 

Davis, Dwight R., Jr. 

Dotson, John B. 

Drake, Richard R. 

Driskell, Earl, Jr. 

Duncan, Earl 

Durkin, Jack 

Edelen, Ben R. 

Elrod, William Turner 

Feix, Jimmie 



Ferrell, Doctor T. 
Fields, Joe D. 
Fritz, Sherman 
Gardner, Howard E. 
Goley, James E. 
Goranflo, R. E. 
Grisham, Jesse R. 
Gustafson, Al, Jr. 
Hagan, Joe 
Harrell, Bill D. 
Haynes, John 
Heldman, John, Jr. 
Hewling, Franklin 
Hewling, Richard 
Hodge, Fred 
Hodges, Holbert 
Hofstetter, Joe 
Huter, Jim 
Inman, Briscoe 
Irwin, Charles R. 
Jenkins, James 
Jenkins, Kean 
Johnson, Walter 
Jordan Kenneth P. 
King, Bob 
King, Jim 
King, P. J. 
Kinman, Joe T. 
Knight, Bill 
Kremer, Joe 
Lance, Walter 
LeVan, Thomas F. 
Long, Bill 

Longenecker, David M. 
Looney, Dick 
Lucas, Gene 
Lytle, Price 
McClellan, L. B. 
McCord, Anthony 
McGuffey, Harold 
McLeod, Robert N. 
McPike, Ray S., Jr. 
Macon, Alan Leon 
Maines, George 
Mays, Ralph J. 
Meade. Foster "Sid" 
Metcalfe, Earl L. 
Meyer, Bud 
Miller, Bob 
Miller, Rex J. 
Miller, Roy J. 
Mudd, Ed 
Mueller, Frank J. 
Mussman, Ralph 
Nau, Bill 



Neal, Gene 
Newton, C. M. 
Nord, Ed 
Onier, Billy W. 
Overly, Bill 
Padgett, R. K. 
Parker, Billie E. 
Peay, Curtis 
Pergrem, Bernard 
Phelps, Ralph "Rudy" 
Powell, Logan 
Pursiful, Cleophus 
Redman, Malvern G. 
Reed, Gordon 
Reinhardt, Myi'on 
Richards, Jim S. 
Richardson, Joe M. 
Ricketts, C. O. 
Riggs, William T. 
Roberts, Earl C. 
Rocke, James M. 
Roller, Otis 
Rothfuss, Dick 
Rouse, Clyde L. 
Rubaits, Leland G. 
Sanders, Mel 
Schlich, Paul E. 
Settle, Evan E., Jr. 
Settle, Roy G. 
Small, Bill 
Smith, Edgar J. 
Sosh, LaRue 
Spencer, Irvin E. 
Stanfill, Robert 
Steenken, William R. 
Stephenson, Harry S. 
Strange, Bill 
Taylor, Ed 
Taylor, Robert S. 
Thompson, Jack 
Thompson, Ralph 
Varble, William 
Vettiner, Charlie 
Weisbrodt, Paul 
Welch, Ralph W. 
Wells, Milford 
Wesche, James A. 
Whipple, Lloyd G. 
White, David B. 
Williams, Tom M., Jr. 
Winchester, Roy L. 
Winfrey, Shelby 
Wise, Jack 
Wurtz, Emil 



Approved Officials 



Abernathy, George R. 
Allen, Nelson R. 
Arnold, Kenneth 
Brown, E. C. 
Brown, John W. 
Brummett, Joseph 
Canter, John 
Cooke, George 
Craig, John C. 
Feix, Al 
Fleenor, Francis 
Foster, William Robert 
Flynn, Bobby 
Freese, Oliver T. 
Hatter, Jack 



Hayes, Douglas J. 
Hyatt, Bob 
Kimmel, Jerry 
King, John J., Jr. 
McGehee, Gordon 
May, E. B., Jr. 
Miller, William A. 
Nixon, James W. 
St. Clair, Robert L., Jr. 
Shaw, Earl 
Sullivan, Don C. 
Weaver, Ray M. 
Willis, Robert 
Wirtz, Howard 
Wise, Billy V.' 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



Page Three 



1959-60 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

REGION 1 



School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 1 Carlisle County 


R. 3., Bardwell 


0. J. Mitchell 


Tom Adkins 


Fulton 


Fulton 


J. M. Martin 


Charles Thomas 


Fulton County 


Hickman 


Carlos H. Lannom 


Harold Garrison 


Hickman County 


Clinton 


James H. Phillips 


Harold Romaine 


Riverview 


Hickman 


A. W. Greene 


A. W. Greene 


D. 2 Ballard Memorial 


Barlow 


Robert G. Fiser 


James Frank 


Heath 


R. 1, W. Padueah 


A. L. Roberts 


William E. Carter 


Lincoln 


Padueah 


E. W. Whiteside 


John C. MeVoy 


Lone Oak 


Lone Oak 


John Robinson 


Gleen E. Dexter 


Padueah Tilghman 


Padueah 


Bradford D. Mutehler 


Otis Dinning 


Reidland 


R. 8, Padueah 


Richard L. Winebarger 


Tommy Stephenson 


St. John 


R. 5, Padueah 


Sr. Mary Mareia 




St. Mary's Acad. 


Padueah 


Sr. Julia Frances 


Jack MeKinney 


D. 3 Cuba 


R. 1, Mayfield 


Joe MePherson 


Bill Presson 


Dunbar 


Mayfield 


F. I. Stiger 


Asberry Dawson 


Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 


Sr. Celine Maria 


Joe Mikez 


Farmington 


Farmington 


C. W. Jones 


Larry H. Colley 


Lowes 


Lowes 


W. W. Chumbler 


Gene Mason 


Mayfield 


Mayfield 


Barkley Jones 


J. B. Story 


Sedalia 


Sedalia 


Bob Eaker 


Jim Walker 


Symsonia 


Symsonia 


Cecil Reid 


Joe Ford 


Wingo 


Wingo 


Howard V. Reid 


Virgil Yates 


D. 4 Almo 


Almo 


William B. Miller 


William B. Miller 


Benton 


Benton 


J. Delton Dodds 


Billy Joe Farris 


Douglass 


Murray 


L. P. Miller 


J. L. Prewitt 


Hazel 


Hazel 


Guy Lovins 


Richard Vincent 


Kirksey 


Kirksey 


M. B. Rogers 


George W. Dowdy 


Lynn Grove 


Lynn Grove 


Raymond L. Story 


Lubie McDaniel 


Murray 


Murray 


Fred Schultz 


Glin Jeffrey 


Murray College 


Murray 


Wilson Gantt 


Garrett Beshear 


New Concord 


New Concord 


Edward T. Curd 


Bob Chaney 


North Marshall 


Calvert City 


Robert Goheen 


Charlie Lampley 


South Marshall 


R. 1, Benton 


Reed Conder 

REGION 2 


Mason Cope 


D. 5 Caldwell County 


Princeton 


Guy G. Nichols 


George Perry 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


Ereel B. Little 


Robert Franklin 


Dotson 


Princeton 


B. S. Miller 


J. W. Withrow 


Predonia 


Fredonia 


Odell Walker 


Robert E. Metcalfe 


Livingston Central 


Burna 


Kenneth T. Hardin 


Rex Smith 


Lyon County 


Kuttawa 


John E. Floyd 


Billy F. Bruce 


D. 6 Charleston 


Dawson Springs 


Lewis Good 


Jewell Logan 


Dalton 


Dalton 


A. 0. Richards 


Edwin Martin 


Earlington 


Earlington 


James W. Larmouth 


James W. Larmouth 


Hanson 


Hanson 


Brad Cox 


Brad Cox 


Madisonville 


Madisonville 


Weldon Hall 


C. G. Sherrell 


J. W. Million 


Earlington 


Lester G. Mimms 


Lester G. Mimms 


Nebo 


Nebo 


A. C. Cai-neal 


George Wooton 


Rosenwald 


Madisonville 


Mrs. Pearl Arnett 


Caldwell Smith 


South Hopkins 


Nortonville 


Charles Jenkins 


Earl Adkins 


D. 7 Attucks 


Hopkinsville 


Frank B. Simpson 


William M. Falls 


Christian County 


Hopkinsville 


Clovis W. Wallis 


John Rendek 


Dawson Springs 


Dawson Springs 


(Supt.) R. A. Belt 


John MeClearn 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 


Chester C. Redmon 


Roy Allison 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


Paul Perdue 


Duke Burnett 



Page Four THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



School 



Address 



D. 8 Clifty Clifty 

Guthrie Guthrie 

Todd County Elkton 

Todd Co. Training Elkton 



Principal 

0. P. Hurt 
Waldo Wolfe 
Robert N. Bush 
William R. Gilbert 



Basketball Coach 

Perry F. Hill 
A. R. Rochelle 
Harold Ross 
Jimmy Harris 



REGION 3 



D. 9 Clay 
Dixon 
Providence 
Rosenwald 
Sebree 
Slaughters 



Clay 

Dixon 

Providence 

Providence 

Sebree 

Slaughters 



Mrs. Irene Powell 
P. D. Fancher 
L. G. Tubbs 
Herschel Martin 
James M. Lynch 
Eldon Bradley 



Frank Davis 
Estel Manasco 
L. G. Tubbs 
Herschel Martin 
Byron Watkins 
Eldon Bradley 



D. 10 Douglass 
Dunbar 
Henderson 
Henderson County 
Holy Name 
Morganfield 
St. Agnes 
St. Vincent Acad. 
Sturgis 



Henderson 

Morganfield 

Henderson 

Henderson 

Henderson 

Morganfield 

Uniontown 

St. Vincent 

Sturgis 



H. B. Kirkwood 
Charles Crutcher 
Russell R. Below 
Lewis N. Johnson 
Sr. Sara Ann 
Thomas Brantley 
Rev. R. G. Hill 
Sr. Francis Anna 
H'Earl Evans 



Peter Renibert 
George McGill 
Donald Chapman 
Norman O'Nan 
James K. Lindenberg 
Bill Foster 
Rev. Anthony Ziegler 
William Allard 
H. D. Holt, Jr. 



D. 11 Bremen 
Calhoun 
Livermore 
Sacramento 



Bremen 
Calhoun 
Livermore 
Sacramento 



D. 12 Daviess County Owensboro 

Owensboro Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic Owensboro 

Western Owensboro 



Hoy R. Long 
L. D. Knight 
J. David Boyken 
Paul Phillips 

W. P. Wheeler 
Joe O. Brown 
Sr. Helen Constance 
H. E. Goodloe 



Bob Rickard 
Harvey Hackworth 
Don Walker 
Bob Daniels 

W. B. Sydnor 
Robert Watson 
William T. Settles 
Warren Moxley 



REGION 4 



D. 13 Breckinridge Co. 
Flaherty 
Frederick-Fraize 
Hawesville 
Irvington 
Lewisport 
Meade County 



Hardinsburg 

R. 3, Vine Grove 

Cloverport 

Hawesville 

Irvington 

Lewisport 

Brandenburg 



R. F. Peters 
H. W. Hunt 
Earl Grimes 
B. H. Crowe 
William O. Jackson 
Forrest Williamson, Jr. 
William J. Allen 



Howard Owens 
Terry Cummins 
W. T. Bennett 
Denzil Mefford 
Jack Williamson 
Edgar Payne 
Billy Case 



D. 14 Butler County 
Caneyville 
Clarkson 

Edmonson County 
Leitchfield 



Morgantown 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Brownsville 

Leitchfield 



Foyest West 
Ramon Majors 
James M. Wood 
J. P. Alexander 
John Hill Taylor 



W. 0. Warren 
Bob Burres 
Bowman Davenport 
Dan King 
John Hill Taylor 



D. 15 Beaver Dam 
Centertown 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 



Beaver Dam 
Centertown 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 



Shelby C. Forsythe, Jr. 
Bryan Taylor 
Earl S. Raid 
Charles S. Combs 
W. M. Arnold 



Maurice Martin 
Darvis Snodgxass 
Bruce Stewart 
Charles S. Combs 
J. R. Whitehead 



D. 16 Central City 
Community 
Drakesboro 
Graham 
Greenville 
Hughes-Kirk 



Central City 

Drakesboro 

Drakesboro 

Graham 

Greenville 

Beechmont 



Muhlenberg Central Powderly 



Delmas Gish 
William Traylor 
Willard J. Wilcutt 
James Jennings 
John R. Owens 
Lyle C. Baugh 
T. E. Spear 



Jackie Day 
Norman Pritchett 
James Hill 
Wayne Ewing 
Kenny Sidwell 
Charles Eades 
L. B. Gaston 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



Page Five 



School 

D. 17 Alvaton 

Bowling Green 

Bristow 

College 

Franklin-Simpson 

High Street 

Lincoln 

North Warren 

Richardsville 

St. Joseph 

Warren County 



Address 



REGION 5 

Principal 



Alvaton 

Bowling Green 

R. 1, Bowling Green 

Bowling Green 

Franklin 

Bowling Green 

Franklin 

Smiths Grove 

Richardsville 

Bowling Green 

Bowling Green 



Arthur M. Reynolds 
Raymond H. Herndon 
Kenneth Harvey 
J. C. Carpenter 
J. W. Dunn 
E. T. Buford 
W. H. Story 
Andrew Renick 
George Coker, Jr. 
Sr. John Lynette 
C. H. Harris 



Basketball Coach 

James Walker 
Denvil Barriger 
Jay Atkerson 
Alvin Almond 
Clarence Musgrave 
F. O. Moxley 
George Davis 
Robert Fox 
John L. Price 
Ken Hightower 
Jesse Kimbrough 



D. 18 Adairville 
Auburn 

Chandler's Chapel 
Lewisburg 
Olmstead 
Russellville 



Adairville 

Auburn 

R. 2, Auburn 

Lewisburg 

Olmstead 

Russellville 



Jesse L. Richards 
H. M. Watkins 
Morris Shelton 
Joe M. Vance 
W. N. Alexander 
Harold Hunter 



Ralph Sharp 
Ronald Clark 
Thomas D. Garrett 
Van Washer 
Earle Shelton 
James Young 



D. 19 Allen County 
Austin Tracy 
Bunche 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
Temple Hill 



Scottsville 
Austin 
Glasgow 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
R. 4, Glasgow 



T. C. Simmons 
K. B. Sidwell 
L. J. Twyman 
Edwin J. Mayes 
Frank Newberry 
W. L. Gardner 
H. H. Patton 
David Montgomery 



James Bazzell 
Carroll Holmes 
Frank Terrell 
Earl Bradford 
Glenn Polly 
Lloyd Sharp 
Ernest C. Neil, II 
Bob Pardue 



D. 20 Clinton County 

Cumberland County 
Gamaliel 
Marrowbone 
Metcalfe County 
Tompkinsville 



Albany 

Burkesville 

Gamaliel 

Marrowbone 

Edmonton 

Tompkinsville 



L. H. Robinson 
Leon King 
Edwin Steen 
Ralph Clark 
Garland Creech 
Randall Grider 



Lindle Castle 
James Coe 
Thomas E. Downing 
W. K. Non-is 
Cortez Butler 
John C. Marrs 



REGION 6 



D. 21 Adair County 
Campbellsville 
Durham 
Greensburg 
Lebanon 
Rosewald 
St. Augustine 
St. Charles 
St. Francis 
Taylor County 



Columbia 

Campbellsville 

Campbellsville 

Greensburg 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

R. 2, Lebanon 

Loretto 

Campbellsville 



Brooks Coomer 
Paul Coop 
M. J. Strong 
Eugene E. Tate 
Charles F. Martin 
Mrs. W. R. Smith 
Sr. Doloretta Marie 
Sr. Florentia 
Sr. Mary Carl 
J. G. McAnelly 



John Bun- 
Paul Coop 
John R. Whiting 
Richard Shrewsbury 
John Tapscott 
Herbert Jones 
Rev. James L. Schlich 
John T. Clark 
Sam B. Thomas 
Billy B. Smith 



D. 22 Cavema 
Cub Run 
LaRue County 
Memorial 
Munfordville 



Horse Cave 
Cub Run 
Hodgenville 
Hardyville 
Munfordville 



Wilbur Smith 
James E. Redden 
Everett G. Sanders 
Lynn D. Thompson 
H. D. Puckett 



Ralph C. Dorsey 
Clyde E. Smith 
Cortland K. Cox 
Jimmy Edwards 
Don Bales 



D. 23 Elizabethtown 
E'town Catholic 
Ft. Knox 
Glendale 
Howevalley 
Lynnvale 
Rineyville 
Sonora 
Vine Grove 



Elizabethtown 
Elizabeth tovsTi 
Ft. Knox 
Glendale 
R. 1, Cecilia 
White Mills 
Rineyville 
Sonora 
Vine Grove 



Paul E. Kerrick 
Sr. Nerinx Marie 
S. M. Matarazzo 
Damon Ray 
Earl B. Goodman 
Paul Ford Davis 
H. L. Perkins 
Dellard Moor 
James T. Alton 



Charles Rawlings 
Hardin McLane 
Bob Burrow 
Edwin Goodman 
Larry Perry 
David Buchanan 
Clarence Perkins 
Claude Sharp 
Bill Jones 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



School 

D. 24 Bardstown 
Bloomfield 
Fredericktown 
Mackville 
Old Ky. Home 
St. Catherine 
St. Joseph Prep. 
Springfield 
Willisburg 



Address 

Bardstown 

Bloomfield 

R. 2, Springfield 

Mackville 

Bardstown 

New Haven 

Bardstown 

Springfield 

Willisburg 



Principal 

Vincent Zachem 
T. T. Etheredge 
Sr. Charles Asa 
R. C. Honaker 
J. H. Harvey 
Sr. Lennara 
Bro. DeSales, C.F.X. 
(Supt.) Bennett R. Lewis 
Z. T. Lester 



Basketball Coach 

Garnis Martin 
Ernest Ruby 
Robert Hamilton 
Dick Kinder 
Bill Parrott 
Rev. H. L. Mitchell 
William Eckhard 
William Yankey 
Mike Speck 



REGION 7 



D. 25 Ahrens Trade 
Central 
Flaget 
St. Xavier 
Shawnee 



Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 



Alfred H. Meyer Thomas Bryant 

Atwood S. Wilson Edward Q. Adams 

Bro. Cyril, C.F.X. James Morris 

Bro. Thomas More, C.F.X. Eugene Rhodes 
Robert B. Clem Jerome Keiffner 



D. 26 DeSales 

duPont Manual 
J. M. Atherton 
Male 

D. 27 Butler 



Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 

Louisville 



Durrett Louisville 

Fairdale Fairdale 

Fern Creek Fern Creek 

Pleasure Ridge Park Pleasure Ridge Park 

Southern Louisville 

Valley Valley Station 



D. 28 Eastern Middletown 

Ky. Military Inst. Lyndon 

Ky. School for Blind Louisville 

Lou. Country Day Louisville 

Seneca Louisville 

Trinity Louisville 

Waggener Louisville 



Rev. Jude J. Catelona 
A. J. Ries 
Russell Garth 
W. S. Milburn 

H. L. Hatfield 
J. C. Bruce 
Harry K. Hardin 
Willis K. Niman 
John Pollock 
T. T. Knight 
J. C. Cantrell 



John W. Trapp 
N. C. Hodgin 
(Supt.) L. P. Houser 
H. F. Ludwig 
Kenneth B. Farmer 
Rev. A. W. Steinhauser 
Earl Duncan 



James Swann 
James V. Casillo 
Fred Allen, Jr. 
Guy Strong 

Lucian Moreman 
Donald Brooks 
Forrest Able 
William Houchin 
Gerald Moreman 
William Kidd 
Garland Garrison 

William Hoke 
W. T. Simpson 

Delmar Wallace 
Robert Mulcahy 
Dave Kelly 
Rov Adams 



REGION 8 



D. 29 Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
St. Aloysius 
St. Benedict 
Shepherdsville 

D. 30 Bagdad 

Lincoln Institute 

Shelbyville 

Simpsonville 

Taylorsville 

Waddy 

D. 31 Campbellsburg 
Eminence 
Henry Central 
Oldham County 
Pleasureville 
Trimble County 

D. 32 Carrollton 

Gallatin County 
Grant County 
Owen County 
Williamstown 



Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
Shepherdsville 
Lebanon Junction 
Shepherdsville 

Bagdad 

Lincoln Ridge 

Shelbyville 

Simpsonville 

Taylorsville 

Waddy 

Campbellsburg 

Eminence 

New Castle 

LaGrange 

Pleasureville 

Bedford 

Carrollton 
Warsaw 
Dry Ridge 
Owenton 
Williamstown 



Samuel L. Smith 

C. L. Francis 
Sr. M. Francelle 
Sr. Lucina Maria 
Willis G. Wells 

Jesse Lacefield 
Whitney M. Young 
William A. McKay 
Bruce Sweeney 
Harvey G. Bush 
W. R. Martin 

Moses Orem 
McCoy Tarry 

D. P. Parsley 
Roy H. Dorsey 
Robert Keen 

T. A. Parrish 

Palmore Lyles 
Alonzo Combs 
Ralph Blakey 
Cyrus E. Greene 
M. J. Belew 



Glenn B. Smith 
L. W. Mullins 
Harold Dawson 
Anthony Booth 
Denzil J. Ramsey 

Arnold Thurman 
Walter Gilliard 
Evan Settle 
Randal Pelfrey 
Bennie Mullins 
Bill Gordon 

Mitchell Bailey 
Jack Johnson 
Albert Prewitt 
Barney Thweatt 
R. B. Singleton 
Dudley Whittaker 

Shirley Kearns 
Howard Alexander 
Robert Taylor 
Bill Smith 
Paul Watts 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



Page Seven 



School 

D. 33 Boone County 
Dixie Heights 
Lloyd Memorial 
St. Henry 
Simon Kenton 
Walton- Verona 



Address 

Florence 

S. Ft. Mitchell 

Erlanger 

Erlanger 

Independence 

Walton 



REGION 9 

Principal 



D. 34 Beechwood S. Ft. Mitchell 

Covington Catholic Covington 

Holmes Covington 

Holy Cross Covington 

Ludlow Ludlow 

William Grant Covington 

D. 35 Bellevue Bellevue 

Dayton Dayton 

Newport Newport 

Newport Catholic Newport 



Chester Goodridge 
Willard N. Shropshire 
James Tichenor 
Sr. M. Teresa, O.S.B. 
R. C. Hinsdale 
Eugene Robinson 

Thelma W. Jones 
Bro. Julius May, S.M. 
H. T. Mitchell 
Sr. Clarita 
Arthur T. Tipton 
Charles Lett 



Basketball Coach 

Don Eddy 
Lewis Phillips 
A. W. Lancaster 
Charles Machock 
Don Augsback 
Joe Reed 

Harold Williams 
Robert Naber 
Tom Ellis 
Frank R. Bezold 
Carl R. Wenderoth 
David Johnson 



Donald Davis Roy McKenney 

W. D. Sporing George Houston 

James L. Cobb Stanley Arnzen 

Rev.. John C. Hagenauer James Connor 



D. 36 Campbell County 
Highlands 
St. Mary 
St. Thomas 
Silver Grove 



D. 37 Cynthiana 
Georgetown 
Harrison County 
Scott County 

D. 38 Augusta 

Bracken County 
Deming 
Falmouth 
Pendleton 

D. 39 Fleming County 
May's Lick 
Maysville 
Minerva 
Orangeburg 
St. Patrick 
Tollesboro 



D. 40 Bourbon County Paris 

Carlisle Carlisle 

Millersburg Mill. In. Millersburg 

Nicholas County Carlisle 

North Middletown North Middletown 

Paris Paris 

Paris Western Paris 



Alexandria 
Ft. Thomas 
Alexandria 
Ft. Thomas 
Silver Grove 



Cynthiana 
Georgetown 
Cynthiana 
Georgetown 

Augusta 
Brooksville 
Mt. Olivet 
Falmouth 
Falmouth 

Flemingsburg 

May's Lick 

Maysville 

Minerva 

R. 3, Maysville 

Maysville 

Tollesboro 



Edward E. Ball 
Harold Miller 
Sister Mary Honora 
Sr. Elizabeth Marie 
(Supt.) Tom L. Gabbard 

REGION 10 



Kelley B. Stanfield 
William L. Mills 
Joe H. Anderson 
Tony Raisor 

Alice Kate Field 
Jarvis Parsley 
H. O. Hale 
C. A. Browning 
Reedus Back 

Arthur Cotterill 
Elza Whalen, Jr. 
Orville B. Hayes 
Shelby Mason 
Charles Straub 
Sister Mary Robert 
Eugene Fox 

Joe E. Sabel 
Miss Nancy E. Talbert 
Major Harry Hall 
Charles E. Wilson 
J. C. Falkenstine 
Milton O. Traylor 
William B. Reed 



REGION 11 



D. 41 Frankfort 

Franklin County 
Good Shepherd 
Simmons 
Versailles 

D. 42 Anderson 
Burgin 
Harrodsburg 
Jessamine County 
Mercer County 
Midway 

Rosenwald Dunbar 
Western 



Frankfort 
Frankfort 
Frankfort 
Versailles 
Versailles 

Lawrenceburg 

Burgin 

Harrodsburg 

Nicholasville 

R. 5, Harrodsburg 

Midway 

Nicholasville 

R. 1, Sinai 



F. D. Wilkinson 
Garland Kemper 
Rev. Joseph O'Dwyer 
William J. Christy 
Charles Dawson 

James D. Boyd 
Patrick E. Napier 
William D. Smart 
Billy Lockridge 
Roy H. Camic 
Marion Crowe 
Edward D. Taylor 
Robert B. Turner 



Lawrence Kinney 
Robert Luecke 
Leo Knoll 
Richard Hehraan 
Tom L. Gabbard 



Bobby Whitaker 
Harry Graham 
C. J. Sutherland 
Robert Barlow 

Bobby A. Kinder 
Jarvis Parsley 
H. 0. Hale 
Cecil Hellard 
Richard Gulick 

Clay Evans 
Jesse Amburgey 
Woodrow Crum 
Bob Hall 
Charles Straub 
Francis Stahl 
Joe Simons 

Fred Reece 
Gayle Bowen 
Jerry Calvert 
Glenn Dorroh 
Fred Creasey 
Eugene Clark 
William B. Reed 



Homer Bickers 
Charles Mrazovich 
Charles Furr 
Charles J. Lee 
James McAfee 

James D. Boyd 
Billy D. Marshall 
Forest Sale 
Bill Maxwell 
Amos Black 
Ed Allin 
Leonard J. Cavil 
Monty Singleton 



Page Eight 


THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 


School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 43 Bryan Station 


Lexington 


R. L. Grider 


Robert J. Abney 


Douglass 


Lexington 


Mrs. Theda VanLowe 


Charles Livisay 


Henry Clay 


Lexington 


Clyde T. Lassiter 


Elmer T. Glib 


Lafayette 


Lexington 


Dr. H. L. Davis 


Ralph Carlisle 


Lexington Catholic 


Lexington 


Rev. Leo G. Kampsen 


Fred O'Brien 


P. L. Dunbar 


Lexington 


P. L. Guthrie 


S. T. Roach 


University 


Lexington 


Dr. Erwin H. Sasnian 


Eugene Huff 


D. 44 Berea 


Berea 


Mable E. Todd 


Jim Mitchell 


Estill County 


Irvine 


Luther Patrick 


Rodney Brewer 


Foundation 


Berea 


Roy N. Walters 


Douglas Massey 


Irvine 


Irvine 


Joe Ohr 


Joe Ohr 


Madison Central 


Richmond 


J. B. Moore 


Russell Roberts 


Madison-Model 


Richmond 


Lloyd E. Patterson 
REGION 12 


Zeb Blankenship 


I). 45 Bate 


Danville 


William Summers 


Joe Gilliam 


Buckeye 


R. 3, Lancaster 


W. R. Duerson 


W. R. Duerson 


Cp. Dick Robinson 


R. 5, Lancaster 


W. R. Tudor 


Howard Foley 


Danville 


Danville 


Ron R. Rawlings 


Leon Kingsolver 


Forkland 


R. 1, Gravel Switch 


Donald G. Lamb 


Donald G. Lamb 


Junction City 


Junction City 


Earl Cocanougher 


Fred Rice 


Lancaster 


Lancaster 


Stanley Marsee 


Leslie C. Dyehouse 


Mason 


Lancaster 


Mrs. Tommie F. Merritt 


Warren Wainwright 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 


Mrs. Faye Ward Little 


Harold Murphy 


Parksville 


Parksville 


Joseph E. Wesley 


Hillard Combs 


Perryville 


Perryville 


Garland Purdom 


Lee Thomas Mills 


D. 46 Brodhead 


Brodhead 


D. A. Robbins 


Billy Riddle 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


Lewis A. Wash 


H. Elliott 


Hustonville 


Hustonville 


Cecil Purdom 


Jack Johnson 


Liberty 


Liberty 


Stanley Bryant 


Pat Tully 


Lincoln 


Stanford 


G. W. Parks 


Charles Kavanaugh 


Livingston 


Livingston 


Charles B. Parsons 


Preston Parrett 


McKinney 


McKinney 


M. C. Montgomery 


Lloyd Gooch 


Memorial 


Waynesburg 


Lawrence Hale 


Doyle McGuffey 


Middleburg 


Middleburg 


Nathaniel Buis 


Truman Godby 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


Cleston Saylor 


Jack L. Laswell 


Stanford 


Stanford 


J. C. Eddleman 


James Farley 


D. 47 Burnside 


Burnside 


Hobart Thompson 


Oscar Fitzgerald 


Eubank 


Eubank 


J. B. Albright 


Beldy Massey 


Ferguson 


Ferguson 


Howard T. Moore 


Herbert Childers 


McCreary County 


Whitley City 


Martin Marlar 


Joe S. Williams 


Monticello 


Monticello 


Vernon Miniard 


Joe W. Harper 


Nancy 


Nancy 


Herbert T. Higgins 


M. A. Warner 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


Mrs. C. D. Harmon 


Howard Jones 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 


Edward B. Webb 


Robert Randall 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 


John Holbrook, Jr. 


James Bingham 


Shopville 


Shopville 


Murrell Stewart 


William F. Adams 


Somerset 


Somerset 


W. B. Jones 


Ed Tucker 


Wayne County 


Monticello 


A. J. Lloyd 


Ray Mills 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 


C. Frank Bentley 


Joe T. Gregory 


Hazel Green 


East Bernstadt 


Clark E. Chestnut 


Holbert Hodges 


Lily 


Lily 


R. S. Baldwin 


Harold Storm 


London 


London 


Leighton Watkins 
REGION 13 


Gilbert Samples 


D. 49 Annville Institute 


Annville 


Roland J. Simmerling 


Jerry Hacker 


Clay County 


Manchester 


Robert Campbell 


J. W. Thurman 


McKee 


McKee 


Walter Power 


Charles E. Norris 


Oneida Institute 


Oneida 


David C. Jackson 


David C. Jackson 


Tyner 


Tyner 


James W. Wilson 


Jack Powell 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



Page Nine 



¥ 



School 

D. 50 Barbourville 
Corbin 

Knox Central 
Lynn Camp 
Pleasant View 
Poplar Creek 
Rockhold 
Rosenwald 
St. Camillus Acad. 
Williamsburg 
Woodbine 

D. 51 Bell County 

Henderson Settle. 

Lincoln 

Lone Jack 

Middlesboro 

Pineville 

Red Bird 
D. 52 Benham 

Black Star 

Cumberland 

East Benham 

East Main Street 

Evarts 

Hall 

Harlan 

Loyall 

Pine Mountain 

Rosenwald 

Wallins 

West Main Street 

D. 53 Dunham 

Fleming-Neon 

Jenkins 

Kingdom Come 

Letcher 

White.sburg 
D. 54 Buckhorn 

Dike Combs Mem. 

Hazard 

Leatherwood 

Leslie County 

M. C. Napier 
D.55 Breathitt 

Carr Creek 

Cordia 

Hindman 

Jackson 

Knott County 

Magoffin Bapt. Inst. 
D. 56 Hazel Green Acad. 

Lee County 

Owsley County 

Powell County 

Wolfe County 



D. 57 Belfry 
Dorton 
Elkhorn City 
Feds Creek 
Hellier 
Johns Creek 
Mullins 
Phelps 
Pikeville 
Virgie 



Address 

Barbourville 

Corbin 

Barbourville 

Corbin 

Pleasant View 

Carpenter 

Rockhold 

Barbourville 

Corbin 

Williamsburg 

Woodbine 

Pineville 

Frakes 

Middlesboro 

Four Mile 

Middlesboro 

Pineville 

Beverly 

Benham 

Alva 

Cumberland 

Benham 

Lynch 

Evarts 

Grays Knob 

Harlan 

Loyall 

Pine Mountain 

Harlan 

Wallins Creek 

Lynch 

Jenkins 

Fleming 

Jenkins 

Linefork 

Letcher 

Whitesburg 

Buckhorn 

Jeff 

Hazard 

Slemp 

Hyden 

Darfork 

Jackson 

Carr Creek 

R. 2. Hazard 

Hindman 

Jackson 

Pippa Passes 

Mountain Valley 

Hazel Green 

Beattyville 

Booneville 

Stanton 

Campton 



Belfry 

Dorton 

Elkhorn City 

Feds Creek 

Hellier 

R. 1, Pikeville 

R. 1, Pikeville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Virgie 



Principal 

Charles Singleton 
H. A. Howard 
Clinton B. Hammons 
P. M. Broughton 
George E. Moses 
Jack V. Foley 
John Perry 
Albert L. Gregory 
Sr. Antoinette Marie 
H. B. Steely 
Robert L. Jones 

James A. Pursifull 
Robert Hendrickson 
Miss E. R. Ball 
Chester L. Click 
Shelvie Fuson 
Effie Arnett 
P. P. Estridge 
C. E. Calloway 
Nicholas Brewer 
Kendall Boggs 
J. A. Matthews 
Sam Potter 
Claude R. Dozier 
Charles R. Steele 
Roy G. Teague 
Lee P. Jones 
Gerna Campbell 
William M.. Wood 
John H. Howard 
John V. Coleman 
REGION 14 

G. V. Curry 
Roy T. Reasor 
Dave L. Craft 
Ira L. Frazier 
Jeff B. Mayes 
J. M. Burkich 
Fred W. Johnson 
Homer Jones 
H. M. Wesley 
Bingham Brashear 
Roscoe Turner 
Paul Colwell 
Millard Tolliver 
Morton Combs 
Alice H. Sloan 
Claude Frady 
Orloff L. Knarr 
Edward Madden 
Mrs. James E. Brown 
Mrs. Henry A. Stovall 
Elbert Hudson 
W. O. Gabbard 
H. G. Pennycuff 
A. M. Ritchie 

REGION 15 

W. F. Doane 
Charles Wright 
James V. Powell 
Nelson Hamilton, Jr. 
Scottie Sterling 
Quentin R. Howard 
Landon Hunt 
0. H. Phillips 
Charles E. Spears 
Fred W. Cox 



Basketball Coach 

H. D. Tye 
Harry J. Taylor 
Harold Cole 
Oscar Howard 
Clyde E. Hill 
Garrett Bennett 
Lane G. Boyles 
Albert L. Gregory 
Rev. Tyrell Keller 
Allan LeForce 
Ralph Roach 

Willie Hendrickson 
Wayland Jones 
A. M. McKinney 
G. B. Hendrickson 
Darrell Storm 
Orville Engle 
Ted Curtis 
Charles A. Davis 
James Burkhart 
Fred Parsons 
Emmett Broadus 
Ed Miracle 
Charles Hunter 
Joe Campbell 
Doyle Troutman 
Needham Saylor 
John D. Wilson 
E. R. Gray 
James L. Howard 
Eugene Traylor 

Green K. Smith 
Robert Atkinson 
Jim Summers 
John P. Graham 
H. E. Wright 
Don Burton 
Clay Dooley 
Albert Combs 
Goebel Ritter 
Delano Combs 
Bascom Fawbush 
Robert Igo 
Fairce 0. Woods 
Morton Combs 

Pearl Combs 
J. B. Goff 
Edward Madden 
Paul Sears 
William Day 
Harold E. Flynn 
John Seale 
Bill Orme 
Roger Johnson 



Jim Hutchins 
Monroe Hall 
Arthur Mullins 
W. S. Risner 
Jack Castle 
Donnie Layne 
Gary D. Layne 
Jack Cunningham 
John B. Trivette 
Virgil Osborne 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



School 


Address 


D. 58 Auxier 


Auxier 


Betsy Layne 


Betsy Layne 


Garrett 


Garrett 


McDowell 


McDowell 


Martin 


Martin 


Maytown 


Langley 


Prestonsburg- 


Prestonsburg 


Wayland 


Wayland 


Wheelwright 


Wheelwright 


D. 59 Blaine 


Blaine 


Flat Gap 


Flat Gap 


Inez 


Inez 


Louisa 


Louisa 


Meade Memorial 


Williamsport 


Paintsville 


Paintsville 


Van Lear 


Van Lear 


Warfield 


Warfield 


D. 60 Ezel 


Ezel 


Morgan County 


West Liberty 


Oil Springs 


Oil Springs 


Salyersville 


Salyersville 


Sandy Hook 


Sandy Hook 



Principal 

John C. Wells 
D. W. Howard 

Charles Clark 
George L. Moore 
J. W. Salisbury 
Burnice Gearheart 
James V. Rolen 
Claude May 
Boone Hall 



Paul H. Gambill 
Virgil Porter 
Russell Williamson 
J. I. Cheek 
Harold L. Preston 
Paul W. Trimble 
Hysell Burchett 
Russell H. Stepp 

William A. Heagen 
Ottis Murphy 
Willis H. Conley 
Creed Amett 
Len Stiner 



Basketball Coach 

Jack F. Wells 
Thomas Boyd 
J. E. Campbell 
Estill Hall 
Denzil Halbert 
Ray Heinisch 
Bill Goble, Jr. 
Lois E. Erasure 
Don Wallen 



Paul H. Gambill 
Gail Gillem 
U. G. Horn 
Ivan Curnutte 
Howard W. Wallen 
Billy R. Cassady 
Howard Ramey 
John C. Marcum 



Henry E. Cochran 
Neil Hunley 
Howard Yates 
Leonard Marshall 
Len Stiner 



REGION 16 



D.61 Carmago R. 2, Mt. Sterling 

Clark County Winchester 

DuBois St. Sterling 

Montgomery County St. Sterling 

Mt. Sterling St. Sterling 

St. Agatha Acad. Winchester 

Winchester Winchester 



J. B. Cunningham 
Letcher Norton 
Arthur R. Hawkins 
Calvin Hunt 
Dawson Orman 
Sr. Caroline Mary 
Miss Eunice Haggard 



Julian R. Cunningham 
Letcher Norton 
William Elster 
Robert Crawford 
James Floyd 
Homer Fanning 
Alex Stevens 



D. 62 Breckinridge Tng. 
Haldeman 
Owingsville 
Rowan County 
Sharpsburg 
Menifee County 



Morehead 

Haldeman 

Owingsville 

Morehead 

Sharpsburg 

Frenchburg 



James M. Howard 
James 0. Botts 
Edsel L. Karrick 
Russell Boyd 
Glynn B. Baucom 
Hiram Walters 



John E. Allen 
Jack Roberts 
Donnie Gaunce 
Warren Cooper 
Tom M. Evans 
Harry Howard 



D. 63 Carter Carter 

Hitchins Hitchins 

Laurel Camp Dix 

Olive Hill Olive Hill 

Prichard Grayson 

V'burg Lewis Co. Vanceburg 



Thomas E. Phillips 
Harold H. King 
William A. Carver 
Ollie D. Adams 
Max E. Calhoun 
Teddy Applegate 



Roy E. Murphy 
William Caudill 
Stuart Nolen 
Jack Fultz 
Harold Holbrook 
Hovi-ard Shumate 



D. 64 Ashland 

B. T. Washington 

Boyd County 

Catlettsburg 

Fairview 

Greenup 

Holy Familv 

McKell 

Raceland 

Russell 

South Portsmouth 

Wurtland 



Ashland 

Ashland 

Ashland 

Catlettsburg 

Ashland 

Greenup 

Ashland 

South Shore 

Raceland 

Russell 

South Portsmouth 

Wurtland 



H. L. Ellis 
C. B. Nuckolls 
John C. Stringer 
Frank C. Burns 
Walter J. Ross 
Ann M. Sammons 
Sr. M. Barbara 
Cliff Lowdenback 
Howard Bowling 
Frank V. Firestine 
(Supt.) Foster Meade 
Stanley Ramey 



Bob Wright 
W. A. West 
Delmis Donta 
Harold Barker 
Harold D. Tate 
George Arrington 
Jack Gossett 
Edward Moore 
Ronnie Potter_ 
Marvin Meredith 
Foster Meade 
Charles Banks 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



Page Eleven 



The Flying Dutchman 

With 1959 now history, let's take a stroll down 
memory lane to view its highlights. 1959 will long 
be remembered as the year when the football champ- 
ionships were introduced. The most popular action 
taken by the Board of Control during the past decade 
has brought state-wide acclaim from coaches, spec- 
tators, sports writers and officials. The Dutchman's 
prediction for 1960 is that football interest will in- 
crease by leaps and bounds because of this wise 
action. 

Early in the spring of 1959, we predicted that 
Ralph Mussman, popular Newport sports official, 
would be elected Mayor of that City by a landslide; 
at the same time, the old Dutch Neck was again 
laid on the block with the prediction that the "Ash- 
land Fireball," George Conley, would win his race 
for the State Senate. Ralph was an easy winner 
and George set a new record in earning the title, 
"Senator Conley." 

With the Football Rules Committee meeting 
scheduled in Indianapolis in January, and with "Big 
Ed McNabb" helping write the rules, another 1959 
prediction is that a good job will be done for the 
high schools. The time may not be too far off when 
it may be necessary for the high schools to write 
their own basketball rules just as the football 
rules are now written. 

1959 records another achievement by "Moun- 
taineer Russ Williamson." This year saw the popu- 
lar sports leader become President of the Inez 
Deposit Bank, adding another activity to his long 
list. Time has marched on for Russ, progressing 
from coach to principal to Board of Control Chair- 
man and now to Bank President. 

Another fine achievement turned in by the 
Commissioner's Office was the appointment of 
Briscoe Inman, Twelfth Regional Representative of 
Basketball Officials. Compliments are coming to 
The Dutchman daily, praising the work "Brainy 
Briscoe" is doing with his basketball demonstration 
clinics. The Centre College Athletic Chief has an- 
other clinic behind him and another success. This 
was at Somerset on December 17th. 

A telephone call from "Hooper" Eblin, Tennessee 
Tech, representing the Ohio Valley Conference, in- 
dicated that conference's interest in another of 
Kentucky's outstanding sports officials. "Hooper" 
told The Dutchman that "Chunkie Ben" Edelen is 
getting top consideration as the next Commissioner 
of the O.V.C, succeeding my good friend, "Slim" 
Porter. Another prediction by your Dutchman 
Prophet is that "Chunkie Ben" will do a magnificient 
job in this capacity. 

Enough for our trip back into 1959! 

Let's look at some of the new items on our 
agenda. The first and most important is the recog- 
nition long due Fred "Rock" Reece of Paris. The 
Bourbon County High sports enthusiast not only 
gets The Flying Dutchman's "Corn Cob Pipe" award 
for January but he also gets the acclaim of hun- 
dreds of young men over Kentucky who have bene- 
fited by "Rock's" unselfish service. The "Rock" 
is hereby listed on The Dutchman's Wall of Fame 
as one of nature's noblemen. Pesonally, I'd rather 
claim friendship with "Rock" than have a brand 
new set of curls start growing on my rapidly baring 
dome. 

From E'Town Catholic High Coach Hardin 
McLane comes an invitation to engage in a long- 




■%'^% 




*-?^' 



BEN EDELEN 

distance telephone conversation on basketball for 
a tape recording for Coach McLane's radio sports 
show which he calls "Coach's Corner." Citizens of 
Elizabethtown set their clocks with "Mac's" pro- 
gram. Fom Purdue University comes an invita- 
tion to The Dutchman to speak on March 21st to 
approximately 1,000 young athletes at the annual 
banquet sponsored by the Lafayette, Indiana, Ex- 
change Club. 

As invitations come in for speeches. The Dutch- 
man reminds Kentuckians that he would like to 
accept them all but he must limit his athetic ban- 
quet speeches and his commencement speeches to 
three each. 

Let's take a look in the mailbag at some of 
the questions contained in letters coming from all 
sections of the Commonwealth along with The 
Dutchman's replies! 
Dear Dutchman: 

(1) How are The Flying Dutchman awards 
determined ? 

Answer: If a Kentuckian recommends an in- 
dividual for The Flying Dutchman Corn Cob Award, 
indicating his unselfish work, the Corn Cob Award 
is automatic. The same is true of an Abou Ben 
Adhem Award for schools and communities. 

(2) Who pays for The Flying Dutchman 
awards ? 

Answer: The Flying Dutchman personally. 

(3) How long have you been writing this 
column ? 

Answer: Since 1950. 

(4) How old is Commissioner Ted Sanford? 
Answer: Ageless! 

(5) May I recommend Dick Looney for the 
Mr. Methusaleh award? 

Answer: Impossible! This award is not for 
youngsters. 

In keeping with The Dutchman's policy of 
closing the column with some of his Dutch philos- 
ophy. Now Hear This: 

"If men grew physically at the rate they grow 
spiritually, lots of them would spend their lives 
in a playpen." 

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!! 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



DURRETT— CLASS AAA STATE RUNNER-UP 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgrs. Demaree, Adams; Reisser. Haney. Hunter. Stiles, Russell, Cline, Raymer. 
George. Parrish. Williams. Mgr. Huffmer. Second Row: Coach Clark. Allsmiller, Caddie, Hadley. Melcher, V. 
Randall. Senn. Hujo. Hebel, Pulliam. J. Randall, Terr ell. Brunson. Coach Slechter. Third Row: Ath. Dir. Grey- 
nolds. Coach Miller. Hodges. Cox. Cooper. Myers, Miller. Puekett. Rudolph, Heyser, Klein. Pierce. Jones, Coach 
Slucher. Head Coach Redman. 



Conference Standings 

Barren River Eight-Man Conference 

Dickinson 







Won 


Lost 


Tied 


Rating 


Caverna 




8 










Hiseville 




6 


2 







Temple Hill 




4 


4 







Park City 




2 


6 







Austin-Tracy 







8 







Bluegrass 


Ei 


ght-Man Conference 




Perryville 




8 










Mt. Vernon 




7 


1 


1 




Paint Lick 




5 


4 







Eminence 




3 


4 







Berea 




2 


5 


1 




Camp Dick Robinson 


2 


4 


2 




Burgin 







8 







Central Kentucky Conference 




Danville 




4 


1 





25.00 


Madison-Model 




6 


2 





23.00 


Millersburg Mill. 


Inst. 6 








22.00 


Mount Sterling 




9 


1 





22.00 


Harrodsburg 




6 


2 





21.00 


Shelbyville 




5 


2 





20.00 


Georgetown 




7 


2 





18.89 


Lancaster 




6 


2 





18.75 


Winchester 




5 


4 





17.22 


Cynthiana 




4 


4 


1 


16.11 


Henry Clay 




1 


3 


1 


16.00 


Jessamine County 




3 


4 





15.71 


Carlisle 




3 


4 


1 


14.38 


Anderson 




3 


6 





13.33 


Paris 




2 


7 





12.22 


Versailles 




1 


8 





11.11 


Frankfort 




1 


8 





11.11 


Stanford 







5 





10.00 


Irvine 







9 





10.00 


Somerset 




2 





No: 


Rating 



Cumberland Valley Conference 

East Main Street 6 

Evarts 7 10 

Benham 5 2 

Cumberland 4 3 

Black Star 4 3 



Loyall 
Hall 
Wallins 
Leslie 



Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 



Hazard 

Whitesburg 

Pikeville 

Paintsville 

Belfry 

M. C. Napier 

Prestonsburg 

Jenkins 

Fleming-Neon 

Elkhorn City 



Mid-Kentucky Conference 

St. Joseph 6 

Old Kentucky Home 6 10 

Elizabethtown 5 10 

Bardstown 3 3 

Glasgow 3 3 

Lebanon 2 3 

Fort Knox 14 

Shepherdsville 5 

Springfield 6 

Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

McKell 4 10 

Louisa 4 10 

Russell 3 2 

Catlettsburg 2 3 

Wurtland 3 4 

Raceland 5 

Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 



Highlands 


8 








30.00 


Holmes 


4 


1 





25.00 


Boone County 


5 


2 


1 


20.62 


Dayton 


6 


2 





20.00 


Bellevue 


5 


3 


1 


19.72 


Ludlow 


3 


3 





18.33 


Dixie Heights 


3 


5 





13.75 


Campbell County 


2 


7 





13.33 


Lloyd 


2 


6 





12.50 


Newport 


1 


5 





11.67 


Beechwood 





5 





10.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



Page Thirteen 



Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Corbin 4 1 No Rating 

Middlesboro 6 10 27.00 

Harlan 4 1 1 25.50 

London 4 10 No Rating 

Knox Central 5 3 19.47 

Pineville 5 4 18.95 

Bell County 4 4 18.87 

Hazel Green 2 2 No Rating 

Williamsburg 2 7 13.33 

Barbourville 16 11.47 

Lynn Camp 8 10.00 

Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Henderson 10 30.00 

Owensiboro 6 10 22.50 

Madisonville 7 2 1 21.11 

Bowling Green 6 2 20.00 

Henderson County 6 2 20.00 

Hopkinsville 6 3 19.44 

Caldwell County 5 3 19.38 

Fulton 3 11 18.50 

Morganfield 6 4 1 18.40 

Daviess County 2 4 1 15.00 

Murray 4 5 14.44 

Sturgis 3 8 1 14.35 

Mayfield 2 4 1 14.28 

Trigg County 3 5 1 13.88 

Crittenden County 2 6 1 12.77 

Franklin-Simpson 14 12.00 

Owensboro Catholic 15 11.66 

Russellville 19 11.00 

Providence 10 10.00 



All-Conference Teams 

Barren River Eight-Man Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Ends: J. Strickland, Caverna; Edwards, Hise- 
ville. 

Guards: Thompson, Temple Hill; Bray, Hiseville. 

Center: White, Hiseville. 

Backs: Doyle and Rogers of Caverna; Cox, Hise- 
ville. 
Defensive Team: 

Ends: Edwards, Hiseville; Oaks, Park City. 

Guards: Nunn, Caverna; Bray, Hiseville. 

Linebackers: Wilkerson, Austin-Tracy; Thomp- 
son, Temple Hill. 

Backs: Braden, Caverna; Depp, Temple Hill. 
Bluegrass Eight-Man Conference 

Ends: Jackson and Hundley of Perryville. 

Guards: Glasscock, Perryville; Kurtz, Camp 
Dick Robinson. 

Center: West, Paint Lick. 

Backs: Yankey and Reynolds of Perryv'lle; 
Watson and Foley of Berea; Walls, Burgin; Lindsay, 
Eminence; Nunnelley, Hansel, and Thomason of 
Mt. Vernon; Deshon, Camp Dick Robinson; Ledford, 
Paint Lick. 

Central Kentucky Conference 

Linemen: Hoffmeyer and Rankin of Danville; 
Dougherty, Georgetown; Cole, Henry Clay; Corm- 
ney, Madison-Model; Osborne, Deweese and Miller 
of M. M. I.; Burton, Jessamine County; Green, 
Shelbyville; Fawns and Ishmael of Mt. Sterling; 
Waddle, Somerset. 

Backs: Jackson and Wise of Danville; Briscoe, 
Anderson; Bruin, Georgetown; Burkhead, Harrods- 
burg; Richardson, M.M.L; Lansdale, Mt. Sterling; 
Head, Shelbyville. 



Cumberland Valley Conference 

Ends: Howard, Black Star; Yount, Evarts. 

Tackles: Jones, Cumberland; Mayerchak, East 
Main. 

Guards: Burkhart, Loyall; Dizney, East Main. 

Center: Scott, Cumbei'land; Jackson, East 
Main (Tie). 

Backs: Bryant, Evarts; Hodges, Benham; Felt- 
ner, Leslie County; Hoiska and Powell of East 
Main (Tie). 

Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Ends: Green, Hazard; Conley, Paintsville. 

Tackles: Clark, Jenkins; Stambough, Fleming- 
Neon. 

Guards: Wells, Paintsville; Bradshaw, Whites- 
burg. 

Center: Benters, Pikeville. 

Backs: Mahan, Jenkins; Kincer, Whitesburg; 
Minix, Paintsville; Smyly, Hazard. 

Mid-Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Haydon, St. Joseph; Sympson, Old Ken- 
tucky Home. 

Tackles: Staimpel, Fort Knox; Holtz, St. Joseph. 

Guards: Humble and Wilson of Lebanon. 

Center: Brashear, Old Kentucky Home. 

Backs: Owen, Lebanon; Jenkins, Elizabethtown; 
Carrico, St. Joseph; Cornish, Springfield.. 
Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 
Offensive Team: 

Sammons, Watkins and Stevens of McKell; 
Wellman, Roberts and Lemaster of Louisa; Gum- 
bert, Wurtland; Crank, Catlettsburg; Cotton, Race- 
land. 
Defensive Team: 

Callahan, Willis and Rowe of McKell; Elkins, 
Van Home and Osborne of Louisa; Duncan and 
Thomas of Russell; Maddox, Wurtland; Lewis, Cat- 
lettsburg; Ross, Raceland. 

Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Lemos, Campbell County; First, High- 
lands. 

Tackles: Lewis, Holmes; Moore, Dayton; Her- 
fel. Highlands; Garrison, Beechwood. 

Guards: Wells, Holmes; Napier, Lloyd; West, 
Campbell County; Malone of Ludlow and Berry of 
Highlands (Tie). 

Centers: Bradford, Bellevue; Meadows, Boone 
County. 

Backs: Herbst, Dayton; John Burt, Highlands; 
Drames, Holmes; James Burt, Highlands; Baker, 
Ludlow; Kyle, Lloyd; Creamer, Ludlow; Higgins, 
Dayton. 

Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Ends: Scalf, Harlan; Loy of Middlesboro and 
Zachary of Pineville, tie; Tackles: Rader, Corbin; 
Parsons, Harlan. Guards: Grant, Corbin; Conner, 
Middlesboro. Center: Cawood, Harlan. Backs: Fultz, 
Knox Central; Bird, Corbin; Mize, Harlan; Miracle, 
Bell County. 
Defensive Team: 

Ends: Newport and Scalf of Harlan; Tackles: 
Cain and Parsons of Harlan. Guards: Asher, Pine- 
ville; Seales, Harlan. Linebackers: Rader, Corbin; 
Burch, Knox Central. Backs: Tweed, Rodgers, and 
Mize of Harlan. 



I 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Elliott, Morganfield; Briggs, Henderson; 
Odil, Bowling Green; Napper, Daviess County. 

Tackles: Estes, Henderson; French and Brown 
of Morganfield; Sturgeon, Owensboro. 

Guards: Lewis, Caldwell County; Moran, Hop- 
kinsville; Woodall, Crittenden County; Randolph, 
Franklin-Simpson. 

Centers: Ligon, Madisonville; Dunkel, Owens- 
boro. 

Backs: Anderson and Helmers of Owensboro; 
Glover, Henderson; Mabree, Madisonville; Malone, 
Majifield; Heffington, Trigg County; Kopperud, 
Murray; Brooks, Morganfield. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled January 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise desigmated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Anderson. K'nkle. 1405 Clav, Paducah. 2-0777 

.•\rcher. A. J.. Jr.. Central Avenue. Prestonsburg. 2708, 4571 

Barter, William F.. Co. D 29!). Engr. Bn. (CI APO 169. c/o PM, 

New York, New York 
Bates, Gardner, Box 143 Cumberland, 269 (Bus. No.) 
Batie, Calvin T., c/o Holland Dairies. Madisonville, TA 1-5942 

(Bus. No.) 
Beck. Thomas M.. 827 Ann Street. Newport, JU 1-5786, 

PA 1-0988 
Bohan. Jim, 5943 Oak Apple. Cincinnati 11, Ohio, MO 1-1001, 

ME 1-0010 
Brown, Donald W., P. O. Box 66, Cayce, 2431 
Brown, Doyle. 310 West Lexington Dr.. Winchester, PI 4-5338, 

PI 4-2243 
Burton, Donald. Whitesburg, 2458, 2339 
Byers, Laymon. Welchs Creek, Lakeview 6-5694 
Campbell, Lonnie. Beaumont Ave.. Harrodsburg 
Covington. Ralph D., 1122 Royal Spring, Georgetown, 1359-J 
Cox, Charles Glenn, 326 S. Morgan. Morganfield. 160 
Crawford Donald Ray. 401 W. Brown, Nicholasville, TU 5-4761 

(Bus. No.) 
Dawson, Alhv, Box 644, Morehead State College, Morehead, 

ST 4-5549 
Deaton, Charles. Jr., 1103 Riverview, Pikeville, 7-6923. 7-6810 
Disken, Jim, 2930 Vine Street. Cincinnati. Ohio, AV 1-0316, 

KI 1-9640 
Dixie, C. P.. 608 So. Clay. Louisville. JU 7-7680, EM 6-9561, 

Ext. 325 
Dodson, Gilbert Winston, 213 Greenbrier Rd., Lexington, 

7-2598, 2-2250 
Fads, Walter, Route 1, Box 5, Monticello, FI 8-3849, FI 8-3456 
Ellis, Johnny. P. O. Box 331, Prestonsburg, 2751, 4671 
Ferrell, Doc, 409 Greenbrier Road, Lexington 
Fisher, Larry J.. Wurtland, Oak 943, Armco 323 
Fulkerson. James R., 1120 Pearl Street, Owensboro, MU 4-5458, 

MU 3-3513 
Gaither, Gene, 7704 Edma M. Drive, Pleasure Ridge Park, 

WA 1-3179 
Gilligan. John W., 1146 Tassie Lane, Cincinnati 31, Ohio. 

J'^ 2-2042. JE 1-1580 
Gipson. Jimmy. Route 1, Bowline Green 
Gose. James. Whitesburg. 7729. 2339 
Graham. James, 2601 Elm St., Ashland. Ea 4-8169 
Green, Walter. 1816 So, Kentucky, Corbin. 2377. 465 
Harvey, Bennie. 925 Center. Henderson, VA 6-3758 
Hicks. Don. Route 1. Boaz. 3-6893 
Hoagland, Robert W.. 213 Dewey Drive, Frankfort, 3-3065. 

3-0737 
Holtzclaw. James Roby. Route 4, Stanford. 4-7326, Lexington, 

(Bus. No.) 
Howard, Carl, 109 Garwood Dr., Nashville, Tennessee. AL 

5-2876, AL 5-(;451 
Hudson, J. D., Caneyville 

Hunter. Thurman. P. O. Box 172. Pineville. ED 7-2239 
Hurst. David E.. Box 453. Middlesboro. 707. 263 
Kearns. James W., Jr., Main St.. Williamstown, 3-4731. 4-3393 
Kilgore. Danny. Leatherwood 
Kleinschmidt. Richard. 3830 Burwood. Norwood. Ohio, EL 

1-5574, EL 1-5574 
LaCombe. Leo L.. 43 Meadow Lawn Dr., Valley Station, Ft. 

Knox 4-4428. (Bus. No.) 
Lane. Jack. Bee Spring. LY 7-3685. LY 7-3960 
Leathers. O. C. Jr.. 6 Tanner Drive. Frankfort. 7-4116. 3-9030 
Littlepage. Pryce. 3581/. Sugg. Madisonville. TA 1-7343 (Bus. 

No.) 
Lunn. Riley. South Hall, Room 229. Western Kentucky State 

College. Bowling Green. VI 3-9185 
Marcum. Ronald W.. 1148 Claridge Dr., Lexington, 7-6323, 
7-6323 



Martin, Robert Eugene, 608 First St., Henderson, VA 6-4048 

McCord, Anthony A., 1636 Courtney Ave.. Lexington, 3-3814 

Miller, Jack, College St., Barbourville. LI 6-3560 

Miracle, Ed, Box 998, Lynch, VI 8-2326, VI 8-5486 

Mitchell, James. 339 College St.. Georgetown 

Moore. Charles H.. 218 E. Crest Dr., Reading, Ohio, PO 1-0290, 

VA 1-3889 
Mwicle, John, 509 Logan St.. Williamson, W. Va. 
Motley. Paul. 209 Kentucky Ave., Richmond, 619-J 
Newman, Buddy, 223 Lincoln Ave,, Henderson, VA 7-9402, 

HA 5-5212 
Parrott, Lanny L., Box 36, Campbellsville 
Peters, Arthur, Keavy 

Peters, Earl W.. 340 N. Ingram, Henderson. VA 6-2254 
Pettis. Carl. Jr., 47 E. Bel Air Blvd., Clarksville, Tenn., MI 

7-4374, 3500 Ft. Campbell 
Powell, Logan, 819 Delia. Lexington. 6-1653. 2-3266 
Quillen. John. E. Main St.. Hazard, GE 6-4893, GE 6-3711 
Rice, Willard S., 3673 D. Fincastle Rd., Louisville, GL 2-1426, 

JU 7-1121, Ext. 25ft 
Roberts. Earl R. .Route 2. Philpot, PA 9-4071 
Runyon, Tommy Dean, Belfry, EL 3-7883 
Schneider, Robert, 619 Fifth Street, Dayton, CO 1-8581 
Sexton, Steven C, P. O. Box 354, Whitesburg, 2465, 2339 
Sheffer, Larry, 801 N. Morgan. Morganfield. 851 
Simpson. Fred. Route 1. Mason 
Slack. Earl H.. 4630 Hillside Dr.. Shivley. EM 6-8793, EM 

8-1611 
Stidham, Juder, Jr.. Keavy 
Thompson. Arthur Lee, Hatcher Court, Apt. 1. Pikeville, 

GE 7-9141 (Bus. No.) 
Thompson. Thomas A., 430 Hollvwood, Lexington, 6-7326 
Tinsley, Marion F,. 116 W. 22nd Street, Owensboro, MU 4-5464, 

MU 3-2703 
Torian, Virgil, Jr.. 1107y. East Third, Hopkinsville, TU 5-5161 
Welch, Henry C, 301 Maxville, Stanford, 5-2474 (Bus. No.) 
Wiler. James W.. Blaine. OL 2-3541 
Wilson. Burnell Zeke. 140 Wabash. Lexington. 7-6049. 3-2880, 

Ext. 344 
Wright, Paul, 349 Broadway, Hazard. Central 6-4277 
Young. Glenn Maurice. 205 W. 9th, Owensboro, MU 3-7281. 

MU 4-6501 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the K.H.S.A.A. 
building, Lexington, on Saturday morning, December 
19, 1959. The meeting was called to order by President 
Russell Williamson at 10:4.5, with all Board members, 
Commissioner Theo A, Sanford, and Assistant Com- 
missioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

W. B. Jones, moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, 
thit the reading of the minutes of the October 17th 
meeting be waived, since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

W. B. Jones, chairman of the Trophy Committee, 
reported that the Committee had met in the K.H.S.A.A. 
office at 10:00 A.M., December 19, 1959, at which 
time the sealed bids for the 1960 district and regional 
basketball tournament trophies were opened. Mr. 
.Jones reported that the committee had accepted the 
low bids of $29.80 and P8.00 respectively for each 
set of 1960 district and regional basketball tourna- 
ment trophies, made by the Sutcliffe Company of 
Louisville. W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Louis 
Litchfield, that the action of the Committee be ap- 
proved by the Board. The motion was carried unan- 
imously. 

The Commissioner eave a report on the recent 
football championships. He stated that, in his opinion, 
the championships had been well received in all parts 
of the state, with interest . in high school football in 
Kentucky now at a new high. He gave complete 
financial reports on the first round playoffs in Classes 
A and AA, with the following profits or losses being 
involved: Henderson High School and Somerset High 
School each $903.54 profit; Highlands High School 
and Hazard High School, each $979.30 profit; Mt. 
Sterling Hi.gh School and Lynch East Main Street 
High School, each $86.44 profit; Henderson Douglass 
High School and Old Kentucky Home High School 
each $112.44 loss. The Commissioner stated that bad 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 



Page Fifteen 



LOUISA— NORTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Curnutte, Lemaster, Elkins, Cline, Osborne C. 
P. Shortridge, Wellman, Cyrus, Cha£fin, Roberts. Second Row: Miller, D. Kelley, Bowe 
Dotson, Wheeler, L. Kitchen, Estep, Burns, Adkins, Rice. Third Row: Calhoun, Beck, 
McGuire, Chaney, B. Shortndge, Preece, O'Daniels, Arrington. Fourth Row: Mgrs. D. 
Daniels, Simpson. 



Hall, Short, VanHoose, 
IS, B Kitchen, B Hall, 
J. Kelley, Whitt, Ball, 
Hall, Preston, Phillips, 



weather had held down the crowd at the Class A and 
Class AA championship games session, held in Lex- 
ington on November 28, it appearing that the As- 
sociation might lose approximately $1,500.00 on these 
games. He said that this loss would he partially off- 
set by profits which had accrued to the Association 
from the Class AAA championship game at Louisville, 
the K.H.S.A.A. profits from this game being $1,016.87. 
He said that the latter figure amounted to one half 
of the Class AAA game profit, the Board 
having voted unanimously by referendum to give 
each of the schools involved one-fourth of the 
profits, due to the fact that no first round games 
games were possible in Class AAA, on which the 
schools had a chance of realizing profits as is true in 
the other classes. Chairman W. H. Crowdus of the 
Football Championship Committee stated that he 
thought that the championship plan in football had 
been very successful, and that it had great possibilities 
for the future. Mr. Crowdus moved, seconded by 
Jack Dawson, that the Board of Control appropriate 
the amount of $112.44 to the Old Kentucky Home 
School and the same amount to the Henderson Doug- 
lass High School to reimburse these schools for the 
deficits reported by the Commissioner. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner read a letter from Prin. H. A, 
Howard of the Corbin High School, requesting that 
Corbin be moved from Region IV to Region II in 
Class AA; and a letter from Prin. Paul W. Trimble of 
the Paintsville High School, requesting that Paints- 
ville be moved from Region IV to Region III in Class 
A. The Commissioner stated that he thought that both 
requests were reasonable ones, and that the proposed 
changes had his approval on the basis of informa- 
tion which he now had. After a considerable discus- 
sion concerning the merits of the requests. Jack Daw- 
son moved, seconded by Louis Litchfield, that the 
Paintsville High School be changed from Region IV 
to Region III in Class A for the football season of 1960; 
and that the Corbin High School remain in Region 
IV in Class AA for the 1960 season. All voted "Aye" 
except Cecil A. Thornton who voted "No." 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, 
that individual awards be given to the members of 
the winning football team in each of the three classes. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner recommended that the 1960 



regulations in swimming be the same as the 1959 
regulations, with the Swimming Committee being 
given authority to make any necessary adjustments 
in the classes and events, and with girls allowed as 
members of a school team in the diving event only. 
Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, 
that the recommendationss of the Commissioner be 
accepted and adopted. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. Pres.. Williamson announced the appointment 
of three new members to the Swimming Committee 
these bsino- Jack Thompson and Marshall Beard of 
Louisville, and Howard Law of Ft. Thomas. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Robert P. 
Forsythe, that the next meeting of the Board of Con- 
trol be held in Louisville on the date selected by the 
Commissioner. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by K. G. Gillas- 
pie, that all bills of the Association for the period be- 
ginning October 17, 1959, and ending December 18, 
1959, be allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



Basketball Publications Corrections 
CASE BOOK: 

1. Page 6, Comment on Rule 5-2: Delete last sen- 
tence of 2nd paragraph. 

2. Page 12, P.S. 24: In 1st sentence of ruling, 
substitute "responsible team" for "teams". In the last 
sentence, insert "one or more" before "players of B." 

3. Page 19, P.S. lOOB: To conform with ruling, 
play should specify that A2 is touching space mark 
nearest the basket. 

4. Page 20, P.S. 102: Ruling in (b) should read 
"the ball provided by the home team should be used 
only if the teams agree." 

5. Page 21, P.S. 109: Follow ruling in (b) of P.S. 
10 for correct interpretation. 

6. Page 40, P.S. 248: Ruling correct for (a) but 
not for (b). In (b), first live ball, insofar as correc- 
tion is concerned, begins when try fails. Therefore, 
the second live ball starts when the throw-in is touched 
and it is too late for a correction. 

7. Page 62, P.S. 390: In (2), of "A jump ends", 
substitute "basket" for "ring." 

8. Page 67, P.S. 428A: In ruling for (b). Officials 
should determine through conference which of the two 
acts occurred first. Review P.S. 112 and 461B. 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1960 




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We believe you will want to join the 
increasing number of schools using 
these excellent coverages. 

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LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 

CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



Indiana H.S.A.A. Wins Court Case 



The following letter, which was received from 
Executive Secretary Cliff Pagan of the National Fed- 
eration, will be of interest to Kentucky school men: 

"You will be very interested and pleased to learn, 
if you haven't already been informed, that on Nov- 
ember 18 the Indiana Supreme Court ruled that the 
Indiana High School Athletic Association had the 
authority to enforce its rules and the right of pupils to 
attend school does not include the privilege of taking 
part in interscholastic athletics. The Court thereby 
upheld the I.H.S.A.A., which had declared two im- 
ported Illinois athletes ineligible for interscholastic 
basketball at Seymour High School. 

"The I.H.S.A.A., you will recall, had declared these 
two boys ineligible for interscholastic athletics at Sey- 
mour High School because the boys had transferred 
to Seymour when their father was offered a job in 
the community. The boys, through agents, sued the 
I. H.S.A.A. to regain their eligibility. As a result, a 
lower Court issued a temporary order prohibiting the 
State Association from applying its eligibility rules 
in the case. The State Association protested the 
right of the lower Court to interfere with its internal 
affairs and requested a ruling from the Supreme 
Court. It was the contention of the I.H.S.A.A. that, 
as a voluntary, unincorporated Association, it was not 



subject to court action as long as it conducted its 
affairs within the law. 

"The Supreme Court overruled the lower Court, 
drawing a line between the right to attend school for 
an education and the right to attend to participate in 
interscholastic athletics. 

"The opinion was written by Judge Frederick 
Landis, who, incidentally, is the nephew of the late 
Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, the first Commis- 
sioner of Baseball. Two judges concurred. One judge 
was ill and did not vote, another did not participate. 

"The opinion stated, in part, as follows: 

'There is a distinction here between the curricu- 
lar and extracurricular activities of public schools. The 
right of the plaintiffs (Stevensons) under the law to 
go to public schools and receive education and train- 
ing does no include such extracurricular activities as 
interschool sports and games .... as may be en- 
gaged in between picked teams of the 750 various 
public, private and parochial schools belonging to the 
I.H.S.A.A.' 

"The court noted that it had relied somewhat on 
decisions reached by courts of other states, including 
Oklahoma, Florida, North Dakota and the Federal 
Court for the Eastern District of Illinois, since there 
were no previous Indiana cases on which to base a 
decision." 








K. H. S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

i 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies | 

and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's.. We have th€ merchandise j 

listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. I 

BASKETBALLS | 

Get the feel of a basketLall same as will be used in the State Tournament in | 

Louisville, in your District or Regional Tournament. We have the following : i 

No. AFR panel lock molded ball endorsed by Coach Adolph Rupp ! 

and used by the University of Kentucky Basketball Team. ! 

No. XIOL Last Bilt ball made by MacGregor. j 

Both of these balls will definitely be used in the State Tournament || 
in Louisville. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll, printed with 
established admission prices and numbered consecutively. Also PASS OUT 
tickets, ADMIT ONE tickets, all in different colors. $1.25 per roll of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams, All-Tournament teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we 
can engrave and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered resin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaped wood, and rect- 
angular glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once 
delivery. A phone call will get them off to you at once. 

FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Tick-A-Way FF-IS Fair-Play and the dial type 
DeLuxe FD-60 Fair-Play in our warehouse ready for immediate shipment. 
A call will get them to your gymnasium before tournament time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
Our stock is complete. 



Hunt's Athletic Goods 

CH. 7-1941 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



^UTCLIFFE'S 



Will Supply . . . 
Distinguished 
Trophies For Regional 
and District Winners j 




NO. KIA 



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To High School Sportsmen Throughout Our State 
May Your New Year Be Truly Great! 

May You All Be Happy, Successful, Too, 

Is Our Sincere and Cordial Wish to You ! 
"SPORTSMEN'S HEADQUARTERS FOR OVER HALF A CENTURY" 




UTCLIFFE CO 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 








Hiqh khod AthMe 



SITE OF THE 1960 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




Above is a view of the main entrance to the Exposition Center and Coliseum of the Ken- 
tucky State Fair plant in Jefferson County. Freedom Hall, the basketball arena, will be the 
site of the State High School Basketball Tournament this year. The approximate seating 
capacity is 17,000. 



Omcial QrcfQB oith% KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC A§m 
FEBRUARY - ISBD 




TWO FINE GYMNASIUMS 




The top picture above shows Chairman Robs of the Greenville Board of Kducation receivinK keys 

tractor Austin Johnson at the dedication of the $60,000 addition to the Greenville High School Bymnasiu 

Caldwell County Board of Education early in December dedicated at Princeton a beautiful new gymnasiu 

S^Atin^ capacity of approximately 2,500. The lower picture shows 9 pprt of the ^tand; 8n4 playing {l<>or> 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXII— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1960 



.00 Per Year 



National Federation Meeting 

The National Alliance Football Committee and 
the executive officers of the National Federation of 
State High School Athletic Associations met at the 
Claypool Hotel, Indianapolis, Indiana, during the 
period of January 3-6, 1960. The Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association was represented at the football 
meeting by Athletic Director Edgar McNabb, Beech- 
wood High School, football clinic director; Athletic 
Director John Hackett, Ft. Knox High School, President 
of the Kentucky Coaches Association; and Principal 
Joe Orr, Irvine High School, Secretary of the Ken- 
tucky Coaches Association. The K.H.S.A.A. was rep- 
resented at the sessions for executive officers by 
Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford. The Executive Com- 
mittee of the National Federation met on Sunday 
morning, January 3, and the Football Standing Com- 
mittees were in session on Sunday evening. Meetings 
of the Football Rules Committee were held on Mon- 
day morning, Monday afternoon, Tuesday morning, 
and Tuesday afternoon. There was a Non-Athletic 
Conference of state executives on Monday evening, 
and meetings of all executive officers on Tuesday 
evening and Wednesday morning. The Football Rules 
Editorial Committee met on Wednesday afternoon. 

Topics discussed at the sessions for executive 
officers were: Opportunities for High Schools in the 
Olympic Program, Basketball Hall of Fame, Athletic 
Injury Clinics, Liability Insurance for State Associa- 
tions, Workshops for Athletic Directors and Faculty 
members. Eligibility of Foreign Students, Amateur 
Baseball in the High School Program, and Use of 
Tax Monies for Interscholastic Athletics. 

Executive Secretary Clifford B. Fagan of the 
National Federation has summarized the most import- 
ant rules modifications which received the approval 
of the football committee: The summary is as follows: 
A CHECK-UP ON 1959 CODE: Approximately 
20,000 National Alliance Football Questionnaires were 
distributed by the National Federation, the National 
Junior College Athletic Association and the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Approximately 
7,600 were returned and tabulated. This is the largest 
response the Committee has had to the Questionnaire. 
The proportionate vote in one group differed very 
little from the corresponding vote in each of the other 
groups. This prevailed for the check-up on last 
season's rules as well as for possible revisions for 
the 1960 season. 

Questionnaire results, which were received from 
all sections of the country, indicated a high degree 
of satisfaction with the changes which had been 
authorized for the 1959 season. The revision which 
placed the coaches' boxes between the two 45 and 20 
yardlines when on the same side of the field was 
endorsed by a vote of more than 11 to 1. The require- 
ment that flexible-shaft flags be placed at the inter- 
section of the goal lines and the sidelines was en- 
dorsed by a vote of 24 to 1. Approximately 70% 
of the returns approved of recommending that parti- 
cipants wear both face and topth protectors, The 



1959 provision requiring the mandatory removal of any 
injured or apparently injured player for at least one 
down was favored by 92% of those returning Question- 
naires. 969'' endorsed the rule book note urging Of- 
ficials to penalize promptly any unsportsmanlike 
conduct. The rule that no penalty measurement take 
the ball more than half the distance from the en- 
forcement spot to the offending team's goal line was 
approved by a vote of more than 9 to 1. 

Part II of the Questionnaire, which is based upon 
Observation, revealed that 33% considered "use of 
hands during offensive blocking" a major problem. 
16% indicated Officials frequently failed to promptly 
spot the ball and give the ready-for-play signal after 
the ball has become dead. Approximately 1 return in 
4 indicated Officials failed to signal promptly. Failure 
to signal plainly was also indicated as a major problem 
by approximately 18% of those returning Question- 
naires. 

Standing Sub-Committee Chairmen submitted valu- 
able reports which included information and material 
upon which the Rules Committee could base action. 
These reports were made by Kermit Anderson of the 
Safety Committee, J. C. Harper of the Game Adminis- 
tration Committee, Lyle Quinn of the Equipment Com- 
mittee, S. D. Jackson of the Research Committee and 
Webb Porter of the Statistical Committee. W. M. Run- 
yon presented the National Federation's official report 
of fatalities, resulting from 1959 interscholastic compe- 
tition. Joe Kelly addressed the group as representa- 
tive of the National Sporting Goods Manufacturers' 
Association.. The philosophy and application of the 
theory of the expanded neutral zone was ably pre- 
sented by M. F. Sprunger who, during his presenta- 
tion, pointed out the need for additional study of this 
matter.. He called the Committee's attention to in- 
consistencies in the present coverage. A summary 
of these reports will be included in the complete 
minutes. Several carryover problems and new studies 
were referred to the Standing Sub-Committees for 
further study and recommendation. 

ABOUT PROPOSALS FOR 1960: Questionnaire 
returns indicated that 60% were opposed to placing 
the goal post cross-bar on the goal line, even though 
a cantilever device were to be used so that the posts 
themselves would be in the end zone for safety pur- 
poses. Returns also gave evidence that 5 out of 6 
did not favor permitting the team behind to have its 
choice of goals after a touchdovwi or field goal. 60% 
favored increasing the length of junior high school 
quarters to 10 minutes. As has been the previous 
experience, returns revealed opinion was nearly evenly 
divided regarding the advisability of specifying that, 
beginning in a given year, all hard material in rib, 
shoulder and hip pads be covered with soft material. 
3,863 favored the proposal while 3,575 opposed it. 9 
out of 10 returns approved of a requirement that each 
player wear a face protector. 57% of the returns were 
opposed to a requirement that it be mandatory for 
each participant to wear a dental guard. A slight ma- 
jority (54%) preferred permitting ineligibles to go 
(Continued on Page Seven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



FEBRUARY, 1960 



VOL. XXII— NO. 7 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered sb second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1967-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1658-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1968-62), Louisville; Robert 
P. Fors^he (1969-63), Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-631, 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1966-60). Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

^rom the Comtnissionei s Dff'tce 

I960 District Tournament Sites 

(1) Fulton County, (2) Lone Oak, (3) 
Sedalia, (4) Murray College, (5) Caldwell 
County, (6) South Hopkins, (7) Christian 
County, (8) Todd County, (9) Providence, 
(10) Henderson, (11) Livermore, (12) Ow- 
ensboro, (13) Meade County, (14) Caney- 
ville, (15) Beaver Dam, (16) Muhlenberg 
Central, (17) Bowling Green, (18) Olmstead, 
(19) Park City, (20) Metcalfe County, (21) 
Adair County, (22) Memorial, (23) Eliza- 
bethtown, (24) Bardstown, (25) Shawnee, 
(26) DeSales, (27) Fern Creek, (28) Louis- 
ville Country Day, (29) Shepherdsville, (30) 
Shelbyville, (31) Oldham County, (32) 
Owen County, (33) Boone County, (34) 
Covington Catholic, (35) Newport Catholic, 
(36) Highlands, (37) Harrison County, (38) 
Pendleton. (39) Maysville, (40) Paris, (41) 
Frankfort, (42) Harrodsburg, (43) Univer- 
sity, (44) Madison Central, (45) Junction 
City, (46) Memorial, (47) Somerset, (48) 
London, (49) Oneida Institute, (50) Corbin, 
(51) Bell County, (52) Cumberland, (53) 
Fleming-Neon, (54) Hazard, (55) Hindman, 
(56) Hazel Green Academy, (57) Mullins, 
(58) Martin, (59) Meade Memorial, (60) 
Salyersville, (61) Carmago, (62) Rowan 
County, (63) Hitchins, (64) Boyd County. 

1960 Regional Tournament Sites 

(1) Murray College, (2) Crittenden Coun- 
ty High School, (3) Daviess County High 
School, (4) Muhlenberg Central High School, 
(5) Bowling Green High School, (6) Adair 
County High School, (7) Louisville, (8) Old- 
ham County High School, (9) Boone County 
High School, (10) Harrison County High 
School, (11) U. K. Coliseum, (12) Somerset 
High School, (13) Bell County High School, 



(14) Hazard High School, (15) Prestonsburg 
High School, (16) Morehead State College. 
"Certified" Officials 
Since the list of "certified" officials ap- 
peared in the January issue of the magazine, 
two additional officials have qualified for 
this rating. They are: Allen W. Russell and 
Humzey Yessin. 

News About Swimming 

The 1960 State High School Swimming 
Meet for Class A will be held in Lexington 
on Saturday, Februai-y 27, at the University 
of Kentucky pool. The meet for Class B will 
be held at the same location on Saturday, 
April 2. 

Class A will include those high schools 
with an enrollment of 750 or more (grades 
9-12), and Class B will include those schools 
with an enrollment of less than 750. Any 
school may enter a class above its classifi- 
cation. 

Class A will have eleven events this year. 
Class B seven, the numbers being the same 
as last year. Individual contestants may en- 
ter only two events, including Fancy Div- 
ing. 

The Class A events are as follows: 400 
Yard Freestyle, 50 Yard Freestyle, 100 Yard 
Butterfly, 200 Yard Freestyle, 100 Yard 
Backstroke, 100 Yard Breaststroke, 100 Yard 
Freestyle, Fancy Diving, 200 Yard Individual 
Medley, 200 Yard Medley Relay, and 200 
Yard Freestyle Relay. 

The Class B events are: 50 Yard Free- 
style, 100 Yard Backstroke, 100 Yard 
Breaststroke, 100 Yard Freestyle, Fancy 
Diving, 200 Medley Relay, and 200 Yard 
Freestyle Relay. 

The method of entering teams in the meet 
will be the same as in past years, with the 
State Office supplying entry blanks to the 
schools whose principals have indicated that 
they will enter teams in the meet. The As- 
sociation will make the same allowance to 
participants for transportation, lodging, and 
meals, as is given State Track Meet parti- 
cipants in each event. Expenses for the 
swimming coach will be paid if the school 
has as many as four entries in the State 
Meet. 



Corrections 

In the January issue of the magazine 
Coach Ralph Roaden of the Woodbine High 
School was listed incorrectly as Ralph 
Roach. The Midway High School is in 
basketball district 41, not 42. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



Page Three 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 




Adron Doran 

Dr. Adron Doran, President of the More- 
head State College and the Kentucky Press 
Association's "Outstanding Kentuckian of 
the Year," will be the principal speaker at 
the annual dinner meeting of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association, scheduled 
to be held in the Crystal Ball Room of the 
Brown Hotel, Louisville, at 6:00 P. M. April 
21. 

Dr. Doran is a native of Graves County. 
He has A.B. and M.A. degrees from Murray 
State College, and he received a doctor's de- 
gree from the University of Kentucky in 
1952. He is a former high school teacher, 
basketball coach, and principal, and is an 
ordained minister of the Church of Christ. 
He was Director of the Division of Teacher 
Education and Certification for the State De- 
partment of Education from 1952 to 1954. 

From 1944 to 1952 Dr. Doran served as 
State representative from Graves County. 
He was speaker of the House during the 
1950 session. President Doran has headed 
Morehead for the past six years. Dr. Doran 
is a past-president of the Kentucky Educa- 
tion Association. He is currently a member 
of the K.E.A. Board of Directors. He is a 
member of the Board of Managers of the 
Kentucky Congress of Parents and Teachers, 
and he represents Kentucky on the Southern 
Regional Education Board's committee on 
education television. He has developed a 
pre-forestry curriculum for Kentucky insti- 
tutions for higher learning. He^s chairman 
of the committee which developed the new 
program of study for 12-grade schools, 
adopted by the State Board of Education. 



As President of Morehead State College, 
Dr. Doran has seen its enrollment treble 
within the period of his tenure. He has given 
leadership to help create a widely expanded 
and improved curriculum. His faculty has 
grown from 66 to 110. Intergration of the 
races was effected at Morehead without in- 
cident, for which Dr. Doran was awarded the 
Lincoln Key by the Lincoln Foundation. This 
is given each year to the person in the state 
who has done the most for integration. 



KAPOS NEWS 

Pikeville College will be host to a clinic for 
cheerleaders on February 13, 1960. The fee 
is $1.00, registration time is 9 :30 A. M., and 
closing time is 3:30 P. M. Topics to be 
covered are: Sportsmanship in Cheering 
and What's Wrong with your Yell Tech- 
niques. For further information Mrs. 
Bonita B. Sharpe, Department of Physical 
Education, Pikeville College, may be con- 
tacted. 

Transylvania College in Lexington will 
have Pauline Hess, Michigan State, as the 
director of a clinic in the Fall. A chance 
will be given to learn new techniques and 
yells from one of the outstanding cheer- 
leader coaches in the Big Ten. Miss Hess 
is the owner and director of Camp All- 
America. The date is October 1, 1960, fee 
$2.00, registration time 9:00 A. M., and 
closing time 3:00 P. M. Areas to be cov- 
ered are : Cheerleading Techniques, Evalu- 
ation of Individual Yells, New Routines, and 
Skits for Pep Rallies. For further infor- 
mation Mrs. Mildred V. Rodes, Department 
of Physical Education, Transylvania College, 
Lexington, Kentucky, should be contacted. 

Area notes from K.A.P.O.S. give the fol- 
lowing State Tournament plans for cheer- 
leader sponsors: 

"Again, the Kentucky Association of Pep 
Organization Sponsors (KAPOS) will have 
a 'Welcome Booth' set up in Freedom Hall, 
somewhere near the main entrance, for the 
sole purpose of registering and greeting 
you. Please stop by and visit with fellow 
sponsors. 

"Perhaps you would like to have a part 
in making known to the public just what 
is involved in being a cheerleader sponsor. 
If so, we can use you for radio interviews 
or possibly a television program. It would 
expedite schedules if you could let us know 
in advance as to whether you will be avail- 
able for such an interview. 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



The Flying Dutchman 

This month's Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
Award goes to Kenneth Farmer, popular 
principal of new Seneca High School in Jeff- 
erson County. Kenny has merited it because 
of a lifetime of dedicated service to young 
people. All over Jefferson County the name 
of Kenneth Farmer is synonymous with 
unselfishness and hard work. In just a few 
years Kenny has not only developed a fine 
educational program but has molded one of 
the outstanding athletic programs in Ken- 
tucky, besides building a Youth Club which 
is second to none in the Commonwealth. 
Bob Mulcahy, the former all-stater from 
Lafayette, is his coach — and he is a "cracker 
jack" just like his Dad-in-Law, Ernie Chat- 
tin. Ernie is an immortal in Kentucky 
sports. 

On the subject of awards, we note that 
there has been no community recognized 
with an Abou Ben Adhem Award since spring 
of 1959. Check up, sports officials, so that 
you may recommend those communities de- 
serving of this citation. No one has recom- 
mended a physically-handicapped athlete for 
overcoming his handicap to engage in sports. 
Both of these awards have meant a great 
deal to communities and physically handi- 
capped athletes over the past years. Your 
interest in these programs is service to your 
communities and the Commonwealth. 

Sports officials all over Kentucky, with a 
long record of service in the field of officiat- 
ing, are going to be recognized at next year's 
basketball clinics with unusual awards from 
The Flying Dutchman. A lot of interest has 
already been generated in the "Mr. Methu- 
selah" Award. 

From Jimmy Feix of Bowling Green comes 
the following recommendation : 

"Dear Dutchhman: 

"I'd like to take this opportunity to nomi- 
nate, as Mr. Methuselah of Kentucky Basket- 
ball Officials, one of the most dedicated and 
tireless of them all, William Turner Elrod 
of Bowling Green. 

"Turner has been "tootin' " lo these many 
years with a sincerity and efficiency that can 
stand as a goal for all in the "Fraternity of 
the Striped Shirt." 

"After some research and "prying," I can 
report that "Firpo" began his officiating 
while a senior at Bowling Green High School 
during the 1926-27 season. He carried on his 
officiating, as his other duties and responsi- 




The Dutchman 

bilities would allow, through his four years 
as a student-athlete at Western. Turner con- 
tinued his officiating while a teacher-coach 
at Irvine and at Henderson (at which time 
I had opportunity to play for him) and even- 
tually back to Western where he has taught 
and coached since 1948. 

"From escapades too numerous to here 
report, I am convinced that if the 3.3-34 years 
as an official doesn't win the Mr. Methuselah 
Award for the 52 year old Elrod, most cer- 
tainly those years and the even greater 
mileage should entitle him to an "Iron Man 
of the Half Century" Medal." 

The Dutchman can vouch for the fact that 
"Feerpo", as Coach Diddle always called 
him, is entitled to a salute. The Dutchman 
might never have had an opportunity to 
break into basketball officiating had not 
Tumer Elrod asked him to substitute as an 
official in a game between Brownsville and 
Woodburn in the year of 1929. The old 
timers in Brownsville remember The Dutch- 
man's first attempt at blowing a whistle — 
and they still remember the speed with which 
he departed after the game had ended. If 
"Feerpo" did not already have a Cob Pipe, 
he'd be getting one right now. 

Paul Walker, Recreation Director of Bowl- 
ing Green, is Chairman of the Kentucky 
Recreation Workshop scheduled at Cumber- 
land Falls on March 26 through April 1st. 
Kentuckians, interested in learning the op- 
eration of recreation of all phases, will do 
themselves favors by getting in touch with 
Paul to register for this Workshop. Paul, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



Page Five 



who is doing an outstanding job with the 
recreation program of Bowling Green, is one 
of Kentucky's finest young leaders in the 
field of recreation. 

When the Kentucky School Boy Basket- 
ball Tournament returns to Louisville in 
March, Kentuckians may expect to find the 
welcome mats rolled out on every highway 
leading into Jefferson County. Bill Moore, 
Superintendent of Louisville's Parks and 
Recreation, is joining The Flying Dutchman 
to form a team of Co-Chairman for Hospital- 
ity aimed at making Kentuckians feel wel- 
come in and around Louisville. Jack Daw- 
son, Member of the Board of Control, "Got 
the Ball Rolling" when he called a meeting 
of leaders of Louisville and Jefferson Coun- 
ty in January for the purpose of building a 
strong hospitality organization. 

Some of the plans in the "Hopper" include 
activities for young people at Freedom Hall 
between sessions. The City Department of 
Parks and Recreation has a Sports Center, 
which is the finest in the country, set up in- 
side this building which will give young peo- 
ple a sports menu to make any youngster's 
mouth water. They may engage in minia- 
ture golf, archery, tennis — or you name it, 
it will be there. 

Besides this, the Jefferson County Parks 
and Recreation Board will conduct a Youth 
Center in the Armory each morning until 
game time and will set up dances for the 
youngsters after Freedom Hall closes at 
night. In addition to this, the Kentucky 
Theatre will sponsor a late show beginning 
at 11:30 p.m., which will give young people 
another outlet who are not yet ready for the 
"sack". The City and County Police will be 
cooperating. Cots will be set up in the mass- 
ive gymnasium of the Police Department 
where youngsters without lodging may "bed 
down" as long as space holds out. 

These are only a few of the hospitality 
features. The Chamber of Commerce will 
have a hospitality room at Freedom Hall 
for coaches and principals ; all visitors want- 
ing to play golf on Louisville's golf courses 
will play without paying a green's fee — and 
so the hospitality goes on and on with too 
many things being planned to mention in 
the short space allotted The Flying Dutch- 
man. 

Your old Dutch friend signs off with this 
bit of philosophy for Kentucky's quintettes 
who have been unlucky — "The harder you 
work, the luckier you get." 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of 
the University of Kentucky Department of Extension. 
The Code letters "e,j,s,c,a" refer to elementary, junior 
high, senior high, college and adult audiences who 
may enjoy the particular film listed. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
special subscription service plans, offered by the 
Bureau of Audio- Visual Material. 

Basketball 

BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 
$1.50 
Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling- in- 
cluding- stance, grip, control, adjustment, before 
shooting, catching- the ball, and other points. Pre- 
sents game shots, using special photographic tech- 
niques to illustrate principles. 

BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Animated play diagrams, slow motion photog- 
raphy, and action shots are combined in this new 
film prepared under the personal direction of Mr. 
Rupp especially for coaching use. Among the drills 
and plays covered in this film are: pivot man's slide 
into the basket; Play No. 6, the famous Kentucky 
Basket Maker; legal screening; penetrating zone 
defense; and the Kentucky fast break. 

BASKETBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 
This is the film for 1958-59, produced by the Of- 
ficial Sports Film Service under the sanction of 
the National Federation. A fantastic dream sequence 
where impossible and nightmarish situations can 
and do arise is the continuity thread used through- 
out the film to depict: Accepted officiating proce- 
dures — problems created by double fouls and false 
double fouls — tricky situations connected with 
front and back court — jump ball infractions and 
procedures — little understood distinction between 
player and team control — and a panorama of basic 
rule fundamentals. 

BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS — INDIVIDUAL 
TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a, 1% reels, $2.50 
Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, uses his team to demonstrate the fundamen- 
tals of basketball. Slow-motion photography is 
used to break the various court techniques do^wn 
into easily grasped essentials. 

BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, $2.50 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 
This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 

BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 
reel, $1.50 
The basic strategy of offense play (fakes, rolls, 
cutting, screening, varying pace) and defense play 
(player to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, 
and diagonal) is demonstrated and explained in this 
film. 

BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 
1 reel, $1.50 
Basic movement skills (running, starting, stop- 
ping, turning) passing (finger control, movement 
with the pass, leading the receiver, choice of the 
right pass), catching (side pass, high pass), shoot- 
ing (finger control, arm extension, wrist flip, choice 
of the right shot), dribbling, making, and pivoting 
are demonstrated and explained in this film. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



BETTER BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 
This film is produced by the Official Sports Film 
Service under the sanction of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associations. It 
demonstrates current rules and good officiating 
procedure, wdth colorful action by skilled players. 

CARR CREEK VS. HENDERSON (1956) K.H.S. 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j- 

s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 

The final game of the 1956 State Basketball 

Tournament is shown in this film. Carr Creek High 

School defeated Henderson by a narrow margin, 

72 to 68, to win the championship. 

CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALI^TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 
Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means 
best used under varying conditions. 

DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL 
j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvering 
him out of position and other basic skills are illus- 
trated, using special photography to demonstrate 
points. Rebounding, pivoting, and correlated arm 
action are taught also. 

EASTERN VS. LAFAYETTE (1957) K.H.S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 
3 reels, color, $.75 
The final game of the 1957 K.H.S. State Tourna- 
ment was played in Freedom Hall at the Kentucky 
Fairgrounds and Exposition Center before a record 
crowd of 18,000. The final score was 56-52 as the 
Lafayette Generals won the crown for the fourth 
time. 

HAZARD VS. ADAIR COUNTY (1955) K.H.S. 

STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 

This is an excellent film of the game in which 

Hazard defeated Adair County by the score of 74-66 

for the championship. Johnny Cox bore the brunt 

of the attack by the champions while all-state players, 

Ralph Shearer and Terry Randall, were best for 

Adair County. The presentation of all awards and 

trophies for the tournament is shown also. 

HIGHLIGHTS OF 1956 STATE BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, sound, $.75 
Interesting scenes of events during the tourna- 
ment are shown in this film. Action shots of the 
crowd, cheerleaders, and bands are shown in addi- 
tion to a part of the play in each tournament game. 

KING BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The official rules for the 1953-54 season are in- 
terpreted in this film. In addition, play situations 
are demonstrated by members of the Shawnee Mis- 
sion basketball team, finalists in the Kansas State 
High School Tournament. Particular skills are 
shown by Robin Freeman, jump shot artist, who 
averaged thirty points a game for Hughes High 
School, Cihcinnati; Wade Holbrook, a 7 foot % 
inch giant from the Portland, Oregon, State High 
School champions; and Chuck Darling, All-American 
center from the University of Iowa. 

NORTH MARSHALL VS. DUPONT MANUAL 
(1959) K.H.S. BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
The Indians of North Marshall High School proved 



too much for the Reds of duPont Manual in the final 
game, winning by a score of 64-63. All-State players, 
Doyle and Lampley, were best for the winners, while 
Melear and Siers led the Reds. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c-a, 1 reel, silent, $1.25 
Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats 
(1949-50) demonstrate ten different plays in such a 
clear manner that it is easy to follow and learn each 
play. 

RUPP'S PARADE TO THE NATIONAL CHAMP- 
IONSHIP OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $3.50 
This film presents the high lights of all the games, 
both regular season and tournament games, which 
led up to the U of K's Wildcats winning the NCAA 
basketball crown. 

SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures 
the action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and 
fingertip control. Special attention is given total 
body coordination, especially inward rotation of the 
hand and arm making the throw. 

ST. XAVIER VS. DAVIESS CO (1958) K.H.S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j- 
s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 
St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 1958 
State Basketball Tournament by defeating Daviess 
County of Owensboro, 60-49, in the final game of 
the tournament at the University of Kentucky 
Coliseum. 

Swimming 

AQUATIC ARTISTRY, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The film presents a diving exhibition by Harold 
Smith, an Olympic champion. Slow motion photog- 
raphy brings out clearly various points in Smith's 
techniques. 

BEGINNING SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Through scenes photographed both above and be- 
neath the surface of the water, basic techniques of 
swimming for beginners are demonstrated. Land 
and water drills involving kicking, breathing, floating, 
paddling and stroking and pulling with the arm are 
practiced separately, then coordinated as the swimmer 
learns the American crawl. The back float, back 
stroke, and breast stroke are also illustrated and ex- 
plained. 

BREAST STROKE, SIDE STROKE, AND UNDER- 
WATER SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, reel, $1.50 
This film presents the conventional breast stroke 
timing the strokes, and the kick. 

CRAWL STROKE, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented in 
this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the breath- 
ing are demonstrated. This film also includes slow 
motion shots under water. 

DIVING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the 
following points are explained and demonstrated: The 
hurdle jump, determining the correct distance, proper 
arm action, correct way of landing on the feet, proper 
takeoff and lift, correct entry into the water. The 
backward dive is also taught, including lift, arching 
the body, and entry into the water. The motion 
is stopped at various points to enable detailed study 
of form. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



Page Seven 



DOLPHIN KICK , e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

An excellent swimmer, an undei-water camera and 
carefully devised teaching demonstrations introduce 
the new swimming technique known as the dolphin 
or fish-tail kick. Analyzing the body movements 
used in the dolphin kick, the film stresses the im- 
portance of practice for mastery of this efficient 
speedy kick. 

1955 KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL A. A. SWIM- 
MING MEET, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, silent, $.75 
Highlights of the meet and championship heats 
are shown in the film. St. Xavier of Louisville won 
the Class A title for the ninth consecutive year. 
University High of Lexington won the Class B and 
Bellevue "the Class C. 

SWIM AND LIVE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Men of the Army Air Forces at Miami are taught 
to swim from floating to swimming through burn- 
ing oil. The film is useful for pre-induction instruc- 
tion and for safety classes as well as for general 
programs. 

NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 

beyond the scrimmage line as soon as a pass is in 
flight rather than when it is touched. A proposal 
that it be provided the ball become dead when K first 
touches a scrimmage-kick beyond the line was favored 
by 3,964. 2,866 were opposed. A slight majority were 
opposed to a revision which would provide that a 
free-kick beyond the free-kick line would become 
dead when K first touched. The vote indicated that 
2 out of 3 were not interested in including in the 
rules a means of determining a winner if a regular 
game ended in a tie. 61% favored retaining the pres- 
ent width goals and 81% endorsed the present rule 
by which the ball becomes dead when any kick touches 
in R's end zone. An overwhelming majority of 17 to 1 
favored retaining the present coverage which pro- 
vides that when R touches a scrimmage-kick beyond 
the line it is the same as a change in team posses- 
sion as far as ending a series is concerned. Nearly 
60% were opposed to a requirement which would 
provide that a player who committed a foul must 
raise his hand at arms' length above his head. 

The Questionnaire results indicated that the simpli- 
fication and orderly arrangement of the rules in the 
National Alliance Code are continually becoming bet- 
ter understood and more appreciated. 

AUTHORIZED RULES REVISIONS 

1-2-Note: The Committee authorized permission to 
use goals with a cross bar of 23 feet 4 inches if the 
home team is required to use a field equipped with 
goals of this type. 

l-3-3Note: The home management shall also make 

available a competent crew to operate this equipment. 

1-5-1: An addition to the present coverage 

will indicate that a player shall wear a face protector 

while participating. 

1-5-3-c: A note will explain the Rules Committee 
strongly recommends that new hip, rib and shoulder 
pads have all hard surfaces and edges covered with 
soft or shock-absorbing material. 

2-3-3: The revision will provide that a valid fair- 
catch signal is the extending and holding of one hand 
only at full arm's length above the head. It will no 
longer be necessary to wave the hand sidewise. 

2-4: So that the possibility of injury may be re- 
duced, this section Will provide that the area in which 



blocking from the rear is permitted is reduced to 4 
yards laterally on either side of the snap and 2 yards 
behind each scrimmage line. It will also provide that 
to block from the rear in this rectangular area (8 
yards by 4 yards) without it being a foul, the blocker 
must be ir. the area at the snap. 

3-4-1: An item added to the article will permit 
an Official's time-out for "any unusual delay in get- 
ting the ball ready-for-play." 

6-4-2: The revision will provide that only a 
player who signals can make a fair catch. 

7-5-6: The article will be rewritten to permit 
ineligible A to advance beyond the scrimmage line 
as soon as the forward pass leaves the passer's hand. 
However, ineligibles will continue to be restricted 
from touching a forward pass before it has touched B. 
GENERAL 

1. It was voted to include the following items in 
the 1960 Football Questionnaire: 

(a) Do you favor authorizing the Referee to 
make an equitable adjustment or to order a replay 
if the ball becomes dead because of an inadvertently 
blown whistle which obviously handicapped one of 
the teams ? 

(b) Should the rules require that beginning in 
1963 (or in 1965) all hard surfaces in rib, hip and 
shoulder pads be covered with soft or shock-aljsorb- 
ing material ? 

(c) Would it be desirable to remove the restric- 
tions which prohibit an interior lineman from moving 
after he has placed his hand on the ground? 

(d) Should R be required to put the ball in play 
at the inbounds spot if R is the last to touch a free- 
kick which goes out-of-bounds? 

(e) Should it be mandatory that, beginning in 
1962, each participant, unless excused by a dentist, 
be required to wear a mouth protector? 

(f) Shall there be five charged time-outs per- 
mitted in games played in 15-minute quarters? 

(g) Is it desirable to have an Official's time-out 
whenever there is a change of team possession? 

(h) Shall all blocking from the rear, including 
that during close line play in the 8-yard by 4-yard 
rectangle along the scrimmage line, be considered a 
foul? 

(i) Do you favor a 2-minute intermission between 
quarters for changing goals? 

2. The Committee directed the Case Book inclus- 
ion of play situations which would indicate that: 
(a) first touching does not cause the ball to become 
dead; and (b) a Captain's request for measurement 
may be refused if, in the Referee's opinion, it is 
obvious the first down has or has not been made. 

3. Revision of Case Book Play 320b so as to in- 
clude a situation in which the ball is "advanced out 
of the end zone" was voted. 

4. At the request of its Committeeman, the North 
Carolina High Schhool Athletic Association was 
granted permission to continue to experiment dur- 
ing the 1960 season with declaring a scrimmage-kick 
beyond the line dead when K first touches. 

5. For games played in 15-minute quarters, per- 
mission to experiment with allowing 5 charged time- 
outs to each team each half was authorized. 

6. A proposal that the coin toss take place a 
minimum of 15 minutes before the game starting 
time was submitted but received only limited support. 
Because coverage does not now set the time of the 
toss, the toss can be made other than immediately 
prior to the kick-off when it is mutually agreeable. 

7. No great interest in determining a winner if 
a regular game ends in a tie was expressed. The de- 
termination of a winner is necessary when a tie 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



occurs during a play-down for a state championship 
and various plans are now used in several states 
for this purpose. However, there was no disposition 
to incorporate a method for tie elimination in the 
rules. The representative from Maine reported on 
limited experimentation in his state with this matter. 
The results of the experiment did not meet with 
favor and a large majority of those experimenting 
preferred to leave the game as a tie. 

8. A motion to assess a 15-yard penalty against 
the home team at the start of the game when 5 
yardlines are not marked was considered and then 
lost by substantial majority. 

9. Some concern over proper enforcement and 
adherence to the coaching from the sideline rule was 
expressed. Seveial areas reported improved enforce- 
ment during the past season. Other areas indicated 
frequent violations and less progress than desired. A 
motion to delete from the rules any reference to 
coaching from the sidelines was withdrawn after the 
discussion. 

10. The meeting keynote was safety. From the 
opening remarks of Chairman Knowles until the dis- 
position of the last items, the importance and neces- 
sity of stressing safety was emphasized. It was point- 
ed out that there are no expendables in an inter- 
scholastic program and the welfare of each individual 
is of the utmost importance. The Committee urges 
adherence to all safety measures. Members and rule 
interpreters were directed to stress safety aspects of 
the program to coaches, game administrators and of- 
ficials. The editor was directed to include in the Rules 
Book recommendations which will contribute to the 
safety and welfare of the participants. Such recom- 
mendations will include the desirability of having a 
medical doctor in attendance at games and, when- 
ever possible, at contact practices, a stretcher available 
at fields, the need of thorough physical examinations 
and adequate conditioning. 

EIGHT-MAN RULES 

1. The Six-Man field (300x120) with Eleven-Man 
goals shall be official for the Eight-Man game. 

2. The try-for-point shall be attempted from B's 
2 yardline. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled February 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams. Gillus Lee, Grays Knob. 640-W 

Alford. William C. Thatcher Ave., AIe.xandria, MY 7-2462, 

MY 7-8221 
Anderson. Paul W., Route 3. Albany, 8202-Y 
Bryant, Thomas H.. 1428 Rhondaway, Louisville, EM 8-7976, 

JU 4-5435 
Chaput. Louis E., 410 College, Elizabethtown, RO 5-5769 
Davidson, Danny J., 400 R 3rd Avenue. Chesapeake, Ohio, 

72248, 72248 
Franklin. Clifford. 10152 Ziz Zag Road, Cincinnati 42, Ohio, 

TW 1-3567, EA 1-0545 
George. M/Sgt. Michael N.. A. Co.. 1st ABG 502 Inf., Ft. 

Campbell. 3695 (Bus. No.) 
Golden, Leonard T.. 517 Main St., Lynch, Viking 8-2512 
Griffith. Edwin Dale, 2135 Hilton Ave., Ashland, EA 4-2497, 

EA 4-1155, Ext. 475 
Hammond. William. 105 Walnut. Berea, 104W, 820 
Heradkovich. Carl T., H.Q. 538 Engr. Bn., Fort Knox. 4-6051. 



iBu 



No.) 



Hubbard. Ronald Edward. 635 Moulton Place, Portsmouth, Ohio 

EL 3-4993 
Huffman. Charles E., 1020 Stewart, Worthington, Park 1077 
Kouns, Melvin R.. 2179 Winchester Ave.. Ashland, EA 4-9774, 

EA 4-9226 
Lusby. George, 504 Clinton. Georgetown, 678-W 
McCarter. Bobby G.. Special Services, Ft. Campbell 
Munk, McKee C. Henryville. Indiana 2928 
Neville. Fred. 1112 N. 6th St.. Ironton, Ohio. JE 2-5407 
Phipps. Vencil, P. O. Box 51, Barbourvllie 
Price. Jimmy. Wheatcroft, No. 4-2047 
Sipes, Jimmy E., Route 3, Caneyville. Caney 3404 
Stearns, John, P. O. Box 218, Monticello. FI 8-4553 



Stiff, Maurice, Apt. 2, 1509 Arcade. Louisville, EM 8-4186, 

JU 7-9177 
Webb, Jimmy, Lindseyville 

Woodward, Danny H., P. O. Box 253. Nortonville, OR 6-3200 
Yessin, Humzey, 1024 Catsleway Way South, Lexington, 6-4092, 

6-2811, 6-2854 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at 
the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Saturday 
morning, January 23, 1960. The meeting was 
called to order by President Russell William- 
son at 9:00, with all Board members, Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant 
Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Ce- 
cil A. Thornton, that the reading of the min- 
utes of the December 19th meeting be 
waived, since the members of the Board had 
received copies of these minutes. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

Director Jack Dawson reported on a meet- 
ing of the Kentucky High School Basketball 
Tournament Hospitality Committee, held at 
the Kentucky Hotel on January 21, which 
had been attended by him and the Com- 
missioner, representing the Board of Con- 
trol. Mr. Dawson reported that preliminary 
tournament plans, as far as the committee 
mentioned was concerned, seemed to be mov- 
ing along very well. The Commissioner stat- 
ed that the cooperation of the Louisville 
group to date had been outstanding. Assist- 
ant Commissioner Mansfield reported that 
the advanced sales of tournament tickets 
had been very fine, possibly better than ever 
before at this time. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by W. 
B. Jones, that the following regulations 
concerning fees for regional tournament of- 
ficials be adopted: The official shall );eceive 
a fee of $20.00 per game and a transporta- 
tion allowance of seven cents per mile for 
all necessary travel. In the event it is nec- 
essary for the official to remain overnight 
at the tournament site, he ^shall be paid an 
additional $10.00 per day for lodging and 
meals. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by K. G. 
Gillaspie, that the 1960 State Track Meet be 
held in Lexington on May 20-21, and that 
the Commissioner be authorized to set the 
dates and determine the sites of the other 
spring events. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Rob- 
ert P. Forsythe, that all bills of the Associa- 
tion beginning December 19, 1959, and end- 
ing January 22, 1960, be approved. The 
motion was carried unanimously. No further 
business the meeting adjourned. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



Page Nine 



KAPOS NEWS 

(Continued from Page Three) 

"Please notify either Mrs. Nelda Smith 
at Scott County High School, Georgetown, 
Kentucky, or Mrs. Stella S. Gilb at the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky of your willingness to 
take part in the 'interview program' by 
sending us your name and the dates on which 
you will be available for an interview. 

"Principals who wish their cheerleaders 
to be considered for the annual cheerleader 
award should be prompt in their reply, stat- 
ing that their cheerleaders are being chaper- 
oned during their entire stay at the State 
Tournament by a school-approved chaperon ; 
and the name of the chaperon should be 
given. Send confirmation by telegram to: 
President Nelda Smith (KAPOS), Kentucky 
Hotel, Louisville, Kentucky. 

"The Cheerleader selection will be made 
on the following basis: 

1. Appearance (neatness and general good 
grooming) 

2. Ability to execute the yells 

3. Ability and effort displayed in control 
over own rooters 

4. Appropriateness of the choice of yells 

5. Conduct while in uniform (gum chew- 
ing, smoking, using intoxicants or profane 
language. This applies to rest rooms, hotels, 
etc.) 

6. Pep and enthusiasm displayed during 
cheering 

7. Sportsmanship (toward opponents and 
officials) 

"Method of grading, based on possible 70 
point total, is as follows : Excellent, 10 pts. ; 
Good, 7 pts. ; Fair, 5 pts. ; and Poor, 2 pts. 

"The following note is given to those 
schools planning on bringing the school band : 
Bands add color and pep to a contest, and 
they deserve equal time to perform. How- 
ever, there are certain courtesies to be ob- 
served by each of us. With your permis- 
sion I will mention some areas where, in 
the past, school bands have been criticised: 

1. By trying to 'drown' out the other band 
even thought your opponent started playing 
first. 

2. By beating drums and clashing cymbals 
when an opposing player is at the foul line. 

3. By going into a number after either 
own or opposing cheerleaders have started 
a cheer. 



4. By monopolizing the available time by 
playing a very long number or going into 
a second number without giving the other 
band a chance to perform." 

No Extra Charge 

To Spare the Nerves and Spoil the Fans 
Observe the following and your's will be a 
Popular Band: 

Let no Notes Issue from Playful Hands 
Until the Director Calls, "STRHCE UP THE 
Band." 

Do not Toot the Flute nor Beat the Drum, 
When the Action is at the Foul line, BE 
MUM. 

Blow your Horn and Show your Stuff 
But One at a Time, That's Enough. 

Wave the Baton and Declare your Rights 
Unless the Cheerleaders are Yelling, FIGHT, 
FIGHT! 

BUT 

When Tempers Flare and a Riot is in Sight 
STRIKE UP THE BAND and Play with all 
Your Might! 

Anonymous. 



The Power of Athletics 

America is a sports loving nation from tiie stand- 
point of both the spectator and the participant. One 
need only to observe some of the happenings on the 
American scene for evidence of this statement. 

Talce for example, the great American game of 
baseball. During the World Series baseball is the 
main topic of conversation wherever you go or 
wherever you may be. Millions of baseball fans 
across the nation pause to listen on radio or watch 
the games on television. During the recent Series 
it was estimated that one out of every ten persons 
in Los Angeles was carrying a transistor radio. 
During a current baseball season millions of fans 
attend professional, high school, college and amateur 
baseball games. SUCH IS THE POWER OF BASE- 
BALL. 

Following the baseball season, fan hysteria 
switches to a favorite football team. Millions of 
football fans fill high school and college stadiums. 
Every Friday and Saturday in Ohio, three hundi-ed 
and sixteen high school football games are played 
to an estimated total attendance of over 500,000 
people. Crowds of more thn 82,000 attend each 
game at the Ohio State University Stadium. The 
various college conferences in Ohio and elsewhere 
are not without their supporters. Almost every 
Sunday crowds of 50,000 to 100,000 watch the pro- 
fessional football teams, not to mention the millions 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



that are viewing the games on television. SUCH IS 
THE POWER OF FOOTBALL. 

Then comes the basketball season with no change 
in the tempo. Almost every town, village, hamlet or 
city has a local basketball team with its followers and 
loyal supporters. Regardless of floor size, spectators fill 
every available seat and space in the gymnasium to 
lend their moral support to the players and cheer their 
team on to victory. During the tournament time it 
is not unusual in some communities to find signs 
on the doors of business places which read "Closed — 
Gone To The Tournament." In 1959 over a million 
fans attended the high school basketball tournaments 
sponsored by the Ohio High School Athletic Associa- 
tion. SUCH IS THE POWER OF BASKETBALL. 

Horse racing has its Kentucky Derby, automobile 
racing has its 500-Mile classic, golf has its Walker Cup 
as well as championship golf, bowling has its ABC and 
championship bowling, yacht racing has its Lipton Cup, 
speedboat racing has its coveted cup and so it goes — 
all have their fans and followers which i-un into mil- 
lions. To the list of sports already mentioned we can 
add hunting, horseback riding, fishing, swimming, 
skating, skiing, trap and skeet shooting, boating, 
canoeing, wrestling, boxing and many others which 
have their supporters. All of these examples point up 
the power of athletics and the important part which 
athletics play in the lives of American people. 

Spectators receive certain benefits from watching 
or attending a sports spectacle. Social and recreational 
values are the more obvious outcomes. Some writers 
claim mental and spiritual values for the spectator as 
a result of seeing acts of good sportsmanship and fair 
play. Others emphasize the development of community 
pride and school spirit that comes from a common 
interest in an athletic team. Many other claims might 
be made in support of "spectator athletics." However, 
the chief concern of this editorial is to emphasize the 
Power of Athletics as it relates to the participant. 

Athletics are a part of the educational program and 
as such they contribute to the total development of the 
individual. Physical, mental, moral, social and spiritual 
values result from participation in athletics. These 
values and many others are emphasized in eligibility 
cases referred to the Commissioner's office. An appeal 
is often made in behalf of the boy with such statements 
as "athletics is the only thing that will straighten the 
boy out and keep him in school'' or "the boys future 
will be jeopardized if he cannot play basketball or 
football." Many reasons are given why the boy should 
be declared eligible so that he can derive the benefits 
that come from being a member of the team or squad. 

Eligibility for interscholastic athletics as based on 
meeting academic requirements, age, residence, 
amateur standing, no undue influence and many 
other rules and regulations of the O.H.S.A.A. which 
cannot be waived or set aside by the Commissioner. 

As often stated, a program of athletics cannot 



be justified unless it is a part of the total educational 
program. Using each letter of the theme 'POWER OF 
ATHLETICS" following are some values, outcomes and 
characteristics of athletics. 
P — Privilege of representing the school as a member 

of an athletic team; a purposeful activity which 

builds physical fitness and better boys. 
O — Opportunity to develop physically, mentally 

emotionally and socially. 
W- Worthwhile qualities of sportsmanship, fair 

play and other desirable social and moral char- 
acter traits. 
E — Enthusiasm, endurance and energy for living in 

an age of automation and increased leisure. 
R — Reliability, resourcefulness and responsibility. 
O — Outstanding performance which produces poise 

and self-confidence. 
F — Fitness and moral fibre for peace and for war 

and foresight. 
A — Appreciations, attitudes and attributes which 

contribute to public acceptance of the athletic 

program. 
T — Teamwork and the tenacity to keep going in 

victory or defeat. 
H — Health and happiness from competing in a 
wholesome program of competitive activities. 
L — Loyalties associated with his team, his school 

and his community; learn to respect the rights 

of others. 
E — Esprit de corps and a feeling of belonging; en- 
thusiasm for sports as a means of recreation. 
T — Ties of friendship with team mates; tolerance, 

trustworthiness, training and self-discipline. 
I — Inspiration, intestinal fortitude and initiative. 
C — Confidence in one's self and consideration for the 

welfare of the group. 
S — Self-control, social responsibilities and satisfactions 

for living in a democratic society, sportsmanship 

and fair play. 

SUCH IS THE POWER OF ATHLETICS. 
—Editorial in THE OHIO HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE 



Attention, Principals! 

Attention is called to the provisions of 
K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 21, Number of Basket- 
ball Games. The last sentence of this By- 
Law reads : "In one county, conference, or 
invitational tournament, the games played 
by a member school shall count as one game." 

The Commissioner has been advised that 
there is a possibility that many principals 
are not complying with K.H.S.A.A. regula- 
tions with respect to exchanging eligibility 
lists when second teams are involved. Under 
the "By-Laws" heading in the K.H.S.A.A. 
booklet is the following: "Governing All 
Contests Between Teams Representing Mem- 
ber Schools." 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



Page Eleven 



State Tournament News 

Hospitality Committee 

Charlie Vettiner, Director of Parks and 
Recreation for Jefferson County, and Bill 
Moore, Director of Parks and Recreation 
for Louisville, are Co-Cbairmen of the 
Louisville and Jefferson County Hospitality 
Committee which is assisting the manage- 
ment of the forthcoming State High School 
Basketball Tournament. The following pro- 
gram of events has been announced: 

MOVIE KENTUCKY TREATRE "Opera- 
tion Petticoat," 11:30 P. M. Thursday and 
Friday Night, March 17th and 18th. Regular 
price of admission $1.25, Special Price to us 
$.50. Supervision at the Theatre will be fur- 
nished by the City and County Recreation 
Division. 

ROLLER SKATING— Fair Roller Rink, 
825 W. Broadway, Friday and Saturday, 
March 18 and 19, 9:00 A. M. to 11:30 A. M. 
Free admission. Skate rental: 25c. 

ICE SKATING— Armory, Friday and Sat- 
urday, March 18 and 19, 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 
A.M. Free admission, skate rental 35 and 50c. 
Rental on Ice Rink will be paid for by the 
City Dept. of Parks and Recreation. Super- 
vision by City and County Recreation Divi- 
sions. 

TEEN TOWN DANCE AT KNIGHTS OF 
COLUMBUS— 525 South Fifth Street. Thurs- 
day and Friday, March 18 and 19, 10 :00 p.m. 
to 1 :00 p.m. Small Admission Fee. The 
County and City Recreation Divisions will be 
in charge. 

TEEN TOWN GAME ROOM AT THE 
ARMORY— Friday and Saturday, March 18 
and 19, 8:30 A.M. to 11:30 A.M. No admis- 
sion. The County and City Recreation Divis- 
ion will be in charge. 

SWIMMING AT THE HENRY CLAY 
HOTEL— 3rd and Chestnut Streets. No ad- 
mission, but bring own suits. The City Parks 
and Recreation Department will be in charge. 
Friday and Saturday, March 18 and 19, 
9:00 A.M. to 11:30 A.M. 

FREE GOLF AT LOUISVILLE'S FIVE 
MUNICIPAL GOLF COURSES— March 16, 
17, 18, 19. Courtesy Department of Parks 
and Recreation. 

INDOOR RECREATION CENTER— West 
wing State Fairgrounds will be open 9 :00 a.m. 
11:00 P.M. on March 17, 18, 19. Offering 
Tennis, Archery, Basketball goal shooting. 
Table Tennis, Miniature Golf, Golf Driving, 
Badminton, Shuffleboard. 

Price for any sport 25c per person. All 
equipment furnished except tennis shoes. 



The City Division of Recreation will be in 
charge. 

Information desk and Activity Board in 
lobby of Kentucky Hotel and Freedom Hall 
March 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

Pass Gate at Fairgrounds for official cars 
to be Gate 2, off Crittenden Drive, using last 
gate on right. 

Housing Bureau 

Mr. Lewis C. Tingley, manager of the 
Louisville Chamber of Commerce Convention 
Bureau, writes that it is the desire of his 
organization to set up a housing bureau for 
the State Tournament. Mr. Tingley says: 
"All inquiries for the tournament housing 
should be addressed to the Kentucky High 
School Basketball Housing Bureau, in care 
of the Louisville Chamber of Commerce, 300 
W. Liberty, Louisville 2, Kentucky. Date of 
arrival and departure should be given along 
with type of accommodations, and whether 
they would like hotel, motel, YMCA, YWCA, 
or private home. They should state whether 
they want one room with 1, 2, 3, or 4 beds 
and approximately how much they wish to 
pay per night. The minimum will run around 
$2.00. These reservation requests should be 
received in Louisville no later than March 
10, and those individuals making requests 
will receive written confirmation from the 
establishment in which the reservations are 
made. 



Letter of Interest 



Louisville, Ky. 

January 27, 1960 
Mr. T. A. Sanford, Commissioner 
Ky. High School Athletic Association 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Dear Commissioner: 

Regarding taxicab transportation for the 
Ky. High School Basketball Tournament 
players which will be held March 16-19, 1960 
and discussion we had at luncheon meeting 
January 21, 1960. I contacted Mr. Marshal 
Gathof of the Checker Cab Co. and Mr. John 
Werner of the B-Line Cab Co. and both have 
agreed to carry five passengers from the 
center part of town to the fair grounds and 
from the fair grounds to the center part of 
town for $1.50 per trip, one (1) or five (5) 
passengers during the three days, the 16-19. 
This is in accord with my statement at the 
meeting whereas Yellow Cab Co. will also 
do the same. They have also agreed that 
they will have cards posted on the inside of 
their cabs during the time giving the above 
rate quoted. I have talked to the taxicab 
inspector in Louisville, Sargeant Walter 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1960 



Jones, and he will endeavor to contact all 
other small cab companies along the line 
stated by the three major companies and 
will caution them that at no time will they 
be permitted to charge more than motor rate 
for passengers carried on trip. I hope this is 
the information that you have requested and 
also hope you have a very successful tourna- 
ment in Louisville for the Ky. High School 
Basketball. Any further details I can give 
you, please feel at liberty to call on me. 
Sincerely, 

J. R. Sclarenco, Vice-President, Operations, 
Louisville Taxicab & Transfer Co.. Inc. 



Baseball For Millions 

BASEBALL FOR MILLIONS is the new- 
est addition to the family of rules films 
produced by Official Sports Film Service. 
The premier showing was held during the 
Fortieth Annual Meeting of the National 
Federation of State High School Athletic 
Associations. 

The scenes were filmed on Al Lopez Field, 
Tampa, Florida, with playing personnel 
chosen from four Tampa High Schools and 
outstanding players from the University of 
Florida and University of Tampa. 



BASEBALL FOR MILLIONS is sanctioned 
by the National Federation, in cooperation 
with the National Junior College Athletic 
Association, National Association of Inter- 
collegiate Athletics, American Association 
of College Baseball Coaches and the Joint 
Baseball Committee composed of the Nation- 
al Federation and the Major and Minor Pro- 
fessional Baseball Leagues. 

Paul Richards, colorful Big League Man- 
ager and outstanding student of the game, 
narrates for play situations covering the 
official interpretations of a panorama of 
basic rules involving batting, pitching, base 
running and fielding. This film is recom- 
mended for officials, coaches, players and 
fans wherever the game of baseball is 
played, and it will increase the understand- 
ing and enjoyment of one of the great Amer- 
ican pastimes — Baseball. 

General Mills, Inc. and Wilson Sporting 
Goods Co. co-sponsored this new addition to 
the Official family of rules films as they 
have for the previous seventeen productions. 
A color print of the film has been rented by 
the K.H.S.A.A. and placed on loan with the 
U. K. Department of Extension. 




Don t Delay... 




WHY NOT WRITE US ABOUT YOUR 
ATHLETIC AND STUDENT ACCI- 
DENT INSURANCE FOR 1960-61? 

Our Policies have been approved by 
The Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association and are underwritten by 
a Kentucky Company. 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



^ke KiH(fden Qo^nfM^uf 



W. S. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Spec. Agt. 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 

CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



HUNT'S .... 

For Those in a Hurry 

For those last minute needs for tournament play and for the last few 
games before tournaments we have our warehouses full and ready to ship. 
And REMEMBER our motto: 

"WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" 

FAIR-PLAY SCOREBOARDS 

No. FISS Tick-A-Way and Dial Types No. FD80 in Stock. 
CONVERSE ALL STAR BASKETBALL SHOES 

All sizes from 5 thru 17 in Stock either white or black uppers. 

BASKETBALLS 

Our No. AFR endoi'sed and used by Coachh Adolph Rupp and the University 
of Kentucky Wildcats. 
MacGregor No. XIOL Last Bilt. 

Both of these balls will be used in the 1960 K.H.S.A.A. State Tournament 
in Louisville. 

We also have the Spalding No. 100 and Spalding No. PLIO. 
AWARD SWEATERS AND JACKETS 

We have HUNT'S, O'Shea and Butwin jackets, HUNT'S and O'Shea sweaters 
in stock. Speedy lettering service. 

CRAMER AND BIKE AVEB 

Training and First-Aid Supplies. 
OFFICIAL'S EQUIPMENT 

We have a complete stock of equipment of all types for the man in the 
white and black stripes. 
GLASS, STEEL AND WOOD RECTANGULAR & FAN SHAPED BANKS 

All complete with goals and nets. Contact us for prices. 
ADMISSION TICKETS 

All denominations of tickets available and in stock. Two thousand to roll 
and five colors available at $1.25 per roll.. Ticket punchers only 60c. 
TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

Third place trophies and awards for Most Valuable and All Tournament Teams. 
Speedy delivery complete with engraving. 

We only wish that every school in Kentucky could send its team as a partici- 
pant to the 3960 Basketball Tournament. Best of luck to the 16 teams who 
finally make it. 

All of you who will be in Louisville at State Tournament Time come and 
see us. Our display will be, as usual, at the Kentucky Totel. We willl be 
looking for you. 



Hunt's Athletic Goods 

CH. 7-1941 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 





WHILE you ARE IN LOUISVILLE 

FOR THE 

State Basketball Tournament 

Visit Our Sample Room 
Kentucky Hotel, Room 812 



YOU are cordially invited to join the happy 
throng of players . . . coaches . . . fans . . . celebrities 
. . . school and factory representatives who make our 
special Sample Room their meeting place and head- 
quarters during the Tournament. 

YOUR traveling Kentucky school representatives: 
Bill Shannon, Chuck Shuster, Al Le Comte and John 
Head will be there to greet you. 

It will be our pleasure to show you the new I960 
nationally advertised football and basketball equip- 
ment, honor sweaters, 
and award jackets. 




Write For Our Spring 
Catalog 

If you have not received 
your copy of the new I960 
Sutcliffe Catalog which 
features the very finest in 
Baseball - Track ■ Softball - 
Tennis and other Athletic 
Equipment, please let us 
know at once — by letter or 
post card. 



UTCLIFFB^ft 

225-227 So. 4th St., Louisville, Ky. 



illill|n'':ii \^ 




^ 



Hiqh khool AthMf 



St. Xavier High School Swimming Team 
Kentucky Class "A" Champion— 1960 





fLeft to Kight) Front Row: Hubbiich, Bohannon, Vetter, T. Uiebold, French, Collins, 
Kotcher. Second Row: Buschemeyer, Kute, Horton, Sprauer, Ambrose, Prescott, Bowen. 
Third Row: Aubrey, Fischer, Hines, Ackerman, Parsons, Rausch, Knopf, Merkt, Captain 
Coy. Fourth Row: Tandy, Harpring, Lococo, G. Diebold, Profumo, Martin, Reilly. 



OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MARCH - 13B0 



Modern Ides of March 



The gym lights gleam like a beacon beam 

And a million motors hum 
In a good will flight on a Friday night; 

For basketball beckons, "Come!" 



A sharp-shooting mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged feet fly, the ball sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 



The colors clash as silk suits flash 

And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail, 
All fans are birds of a feather 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is fuU of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relative under the skin. 



It's festival time. — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nation-wide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And liberty lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead, — 
In this happy Madness of March ! 

— H. V. Porter. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXII— NO. 8 



March, 1960 



$1.00 Per Year 



GUEST EDITORIAL 

Athletic Participation 

The benefits from athletic participation 
should be enjoyable, lasting and beneficial. 
This activity is by far the most expensive 
extra-curricular activity in our schools and 
in order to be justified it should be conduct- 
ed in such a way that our sons receive last- 
ing benefits from it. 

Athletic participation should give to our 
sons: 

1. Physical benefits. While this is not the 
most important phase of the progi'am, it is 
certainly an important one. 

2. A pride in thpir nhysical development. 
Particination should teach them to work 
with others and to sacrifice self for the suc- 
cess of the team. It should teach them to 
work against odds: and to learn that life is 
not always soft and easv. Athletic participa- 
tion should toughen them for the shocks 
that are sure to follow in the future. 

3. Something: wholesome and clean in which 
thev can occudv their leisure time. "A kid 
with a baseball p-love in his pocket never 
stuck up a bank." Forty-two per of our crime 
is committed bv youths under eighteen years 
of age. Athletic Darticipation is one means 
of combatting this evil. 

4. A knowledge of how to protect them- 
selves and an understanding of the benefits 
of clean living habits. Interest in one or more 
types of recreation that will stay with them 
throughout life. To manv it may be the 
means of obtaining an education (athletic 
scholarshins). and to some it may give train- 
ing in their life's work (coaching or partici- 
pating in athletics). 

5. A strength of character that cannot be 
developed elsewhere in our school program. 
If this phase of the prooram fails, the entire 
program fails. "What doth it profit a man 
if he gain the whole world and lose his own 
soul?" 

Properly conducted the athletic program 
can be of lasting value to our sons. If not 
properly conducted, it can do lasting harm. 
If our sons are to receive the fine benefits 




It Won't Be Long, Now! 



outlined above the athletic program must be 
properly administered; otherwise, they will 
not receive good but evil training. If our sons 
are taught to violate the rules by faking in- 
juries to stop the clock, to engage in the 
"sucker shift" in order to gain an advantage 
or if they see their coaches engage in illegal 
coaching from the sidelines or violate ath- 
letic association or board of education rules, 
thev are not receiving the proper training. 

Most of us can look back with deep regret 
upon some of the incorrect advice given us. 
We can remember how someone suggested or 
taught a "slick" way of violating and beat- 
ing the rules, either of an athletic game or 
in human behavior. It is impossible to know 
the full impact upon a community when a 
very few are taught to disregard rules and 
regulations. The evil is multiplied over and 
over through the years. 

A rule is no stronger than the man who 
coaches it or the official who is administer- 
ing it. 

If the rule is a bad one, we should go to 
work to change or repeal it, but so long as 
it is in effect it should be respected and en- 
forced, or our influence is harmful to those 
we teach or influence by our example. 

When a man teaches by precept or ex- 
ample, the violation of any rule is a harmful 
influence and should be corrected. His way 
of thinking will be most harmful to those 
he has entrusted to his care. It may be con- 
sidered "a small thing", "good strategy", 
or "a winning plan", but it is causing a grow- 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 



MARCH, 1960 



VOL. XXII— NO. 8 



Films 



Published montl.ly, except June and July, by tho Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1967-61), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville; Robert 
P. Foisnhe (1959-63), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), 
Georgetown; Cecil A, Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



^rom the Commissione'i s CJfji 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1959-60 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Spring Meets 

Tentative dates have been set for the var- 
ious .spring meets and tournaments in base- 
ball, golf, track, and tennis. They are as 
follows : 

May 9, regional tennis tournaments 
May 10-12, district baseball tournaments 
May 13-14, regional track meets 
May 16-17, State Tennis Tournament 
May 18, regional golf tournaments 
May 20-21, State Track Meet _ 

May 23-24, State Golf Tournament 
May 25-26, regional baseball tournaments 
June 8-9, State Baseball Tournament 

Board Election 

At the copy deadline for this issue of the 
ATHLETE, principals in Sections 7 and 8 
were still balloting in the election for Board 
of Control membershin. In Section 7, Assist- 
ant Superintendent Cecil A. Thornton of 
Harlan County Schools was running for re- 
election to the Board, and he was opposed 
bv Principal Roy T. Reasor of the Fleming- 
Neon High School. There were four candi- 
dates in Section 8. They were : Principal W. 
F. Doane. Belfry High School ; Superintend- 
ent Oran C. Te-'ter, Paintsville City Schools; 
Coach John Bill Trivette, Pikeville High 
School ; and Superintendent Webb Young, 
Bo/d Cpwnt.v SchriQls, 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the De- 
partment of Extension. Universtiy of Kentucky. The rental 
prices shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
special subscription service plans, offered by the Bureau of 
Audio-Visual Materials. 

Track 

The Eroad Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed — timing and coordination — de- 
velopment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and 
hips, one, two, three style — foot roll — single and 
triple air stride — soft versus hard take off — arm 
position. 

Discus, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Principle of centrifugal force — muscle development 
for side arm throw — grips — finger roll — heel of thumb 
pressure — finger exercises — clockwise spin — hip snap 
— reverse and non-reverse styles. 

Distance Races, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeplechase 
are demonstrated. Style of distance runner is con- 
trasted with that of dash man. Differences in 
typical physiques are shown. Slow motion photog- 
raphy is used to analyze movements. 

Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoiding 
shin splint — controlled tension — for.vard knee reflex 
— straight line running — automatic stride. 

The High Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style 
— body lean and reverse — approach — body tension — 
coordination of arm and leg action. 

The Hurdles, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action — 
rhythmic running — hurdling calisthenics — body bal- 
ance — correct clearance — circular stepover action — 
adapting styles of physiques. 

The Javelin, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run — 
concluding stride — throwing stance — throwing and 
reverse — alternative hand and finger grips — facing 
)osition — balance of stomach and back muscle ten- 
ion — throwing angle — body and leg coordination drills 
-flexibility exercises. 

Tumps and Pole Vault, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are shown 
for running high-jump; running broad- jump; hop, step 
and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion photography 
is used for detailed study of form. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

The finals of all the track and field events are 
fhown as Ashland High School won the meet with 26 
points. Tilghman High School of Paducah was second 
with 20% points. New records were set in the Mile 
Run, Mile Relay, and Discus. 

Midd'e Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ball of foot running — automatic 
stride — pendulum and bicycle stride — exercise — counter 
balance(i arm action — push drive — jockeying for 
position. 

Pole Vault, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercises — 
running action — grip — selecting the pole — take-off — 
Western and Eastern style — slotting — novice training. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 



Page Three 



The Relays, j-s-c-a. 1 reel, $1.50 

Passing — visual pass — blind pass — right and left 
exchange — merging of runners' speed — baton grips 
— relay starts, underhand action — cup style — overhand 
sprint pass — f'ly scoop — practice and team work. 

Shot Put, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash- 
impact style and natural stretch stride — synchronizing 
leg and arm action — conditioning exercises — starting 
techniques — slow motion of muscular utilization and 
coordination. 

Baseball 

Baseball All-Star Game of 1956, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
color, $.75 

The All-Star Game of 1956 was played in Griffith 
Stadium at Washington. Stars of the American and 
National League are pictured in action during the 
pre-game activities. Highlights of the game are 
shown as the National League wins by a score of 
7-3. 

Baseball All-Star Game of 1958, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, 
$.75 

Twenty-five all stars from the American League 
defeat an equal number of National League greats by 
a score of 4-3 at Baltimore. Close-ups of the baseball 
stars of today and interesting plays of the game are 
shown in the film. (KHSAA) 

Baseball By The Code, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

Ihis picture gives an official interpretation of the 
rules and a demonstration of game administration by 
Umpires from the Major and Minor Leagues. Play 
situations are demonstrated by high school, college, 
and professional players. Correct pitching procedure, 
interference and obstruction, live and dead ball, trap 
plays, infield fly, and strike zone are illustrated. 

Baseball for Millions, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

In this film a colorful Big League Manager and 
an outstanding student of the game narrates play 
situations covering the official interpretation of a 
panorama of basic rules involving batting, pitching, 
base running, and fielding. It is recommended for use 
by officials, coaches, players and fans. (KHSAA) 

Batting Fundamentals, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic skills which must be mastered before one 
becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat selection, stance, 
grip, stride, swing and follow-through are clearly 
demonstrated in this film by professional players. 

The Batting Stars of Baseball, s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

Who are the big names among batters and what 
makes them good? Watch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well as 
classes. 

Catching In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic skills in catching baseball are presented 
in this film. How to catch a high rapid ball, a batted 
ball, a thrown ball, and a ground ball are shown. 
Stance, footwork, and body balance are described. Slow 
motion and close-up photography are used to enable 
the viewer to follow each step or movement in each 
of the basic skills. 

Catching Stars of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

This is a film designed to assist in the coaching of 
catchers but it is also interesting and entertaining. 
Correct methods and techniques of receiving, throw- 
ing, signalling and fielding are illustrated by Bill 
Dickey, Sherman Lollar, Yogi Berra and Roy Camp- 
anella. 



Democracy of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

The purpose of this film is for further development 
of young baseball players in our modern democracy 
and illustrates this through sports and sports com- 
petition. This film includes a brief history of baseball 
along with a cavalacade of past and present stars. 
Double-Play Kings of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

This film presents an analysis of the double play 
in baseball. Different players from several major 
leagues are shown in action. Fielding, tagging, and 
throwing are illustrated and explained. 

Hitting In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 
follow accurately and graphically the basic fundamen- 
tals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of feet, legs, 
hips, shoulders, arms, and head is explained. How to 
select a bat, how to hold it, and correct batting posi- 
tion are sho\vn. 

Infield Play at 1st and 3rd, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

The fundamentals and finer points of infield play 
at first and third base are illustrated by big league 
players. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging runners, 
etc., pictured, often in slow motion. Sponsored by A. 
G. Spalding Co., The American and National Leagues. 

Inside Baseball, j-s, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching, bat- 
ting, fielding and base-running, are demonstrated. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b&w, color, $.75 

duPont Manual defeated Hall High School for the 
championship by a score of 13-3. All the final game 
is shown in color. 

1956 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

Group pictures and action shots of the eight teams 
in the tournament are shown in the film. Also included 
are the first innings of the semi-final games and four 
innings of the final game between Newport Catholic 
and Murray. 

1957 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Toui-na- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, color, $.75 

duPont Manual defeated Owensboro High for the 
championship by a score of 8-3. All of the final game 
is shown in color. 
Pitching Stars of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. Types 
of pitches and methods for practice are portrayed. 
Play Ball, Son, j-s, IV2 reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film showing a group 
of fourteen-year-old boys who are experts in baseball. 
Correct methods of hitting, catching, and throwing 
are demonstrated in natural and slow motion. Based 
on book by Bert V. Dunne. 
Throwing In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and stop photography are used 
in presenting the basic fundamentals of throwing in 
baseball. Instructions are given for the over-head, 
three-quarter side, side, and underhand throws. Co- 
ordination of foot and arm motion is stressed, as well 
as coordination of the body as a whole. 

Touching All Bases, j-s-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball 
by showing various American League stars playing 
their positions. It is also intended to give fans as a 
whole a better understanding and knowledge of the 
national pastime. The film shows Father Flanagan 
and his Boys Town Team, the Hall of Fame cere- 
monies in Cooperstown, New York, and scenes from 
night baseball games. 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 



The Flying Dutchman 

Don Davis of Bellevue and his officiating 
partner, Bob Miller, are high in their praise 
of two basketball players who won an Abou 
Ben Adhem Award for Erlanger-Lloyd High 
School. According to Don and Bob a player, 
who is identified only as No. 55, brought 
credit to Lloyd Memorial when he raised his 
hands for quiet and got it while a free-throw 
attempt was being made by a Dixie Heights 
shooter. No. 21 on Lloyd added credit to the 
actions of No. 55 when he quieted a small boy 
who was screaming and gesturing at the free- 
throw shooter. 

A citation has gone to Radio Station WIEL 
of Elizabethtown, Kentucky for outstanding 
services rendered in the promotion of sports- 
manship practices. Al Gustafson, Jr., first 
called the Dutchman's attention to this serv- 
ice which was sparked by Hardin McLane. 
Kentuckians ought to know Al Gustafson, 
Jr., better. The first time the Dutchman 
heard the name of Gustafson was when he 
was a youngster. Then there were two Gus- 
tafsons. Al Sr. was referred to as "Big Gus" 
and Al Jr. as "Little Gus." No man ever did 
more for young men interested in whole- 
some sports than "Big Gus." No father could 
have been more thrilled if he had been privi- 
leged to live long enough to see the fine 
record which "Little Gus" has racked up as 
a competitor and now as a sports official. 
Al Gustafson, Jr., "Little Gus," has been 
more than an outstanding basketball official. 
He has been a crusader for the promotion 
of better sports and friendlier relations, fol- 
lowing closely in the steps of a man whose 
memory this Dutchman will always cherish, 
"Big Gus." "Little Gus," you have won a 
corn cob pipe of honor. 

Meet Ronald Richardson, age 10. Here is 
a candidate for the 1960 Game-Guy Award. 
Already a Lionheart Lapel Button has been 
mailed to this young fighter who has over- 
come polio. In spite of three leg operations, 
causing one leg to be shorter than the other, 
he is playing basketball. Ronald, coached by 
Harold Sauter, plays in a basketball league 
sponsored by the Louisville Times and the 
Louisville Recreation Department. Examples, 
provided by game-guys like Ronald, inspire 
other young people to overcome their phy- 
sical handicaps to engage in sports. 

Kenny Arnold and Ray Winchester recom- 
mend Coach Paul Coop and his assistant, 
"Butch" Gilbert, for corn cob pipe awards. 
Kenny and Ray declare that these men have 
displayed outstanding sportsmanship, win 




Al Gustalson, Jr. 

or lose, and are of the highest moral charac- 
ter. The Dutchman would like to add 
"ditto" to what these gentlemen have said 
about Paul and "Butch." Not enough men 
like Paul Coop were made before the pat- 
tern was lost. "Butch" is one of Kentucky's 
luckiest young men to be associated with 
Paul. A corn cob pipe is on its way to 
"Butch" Gilbert. Paul Coop has had one 
since away back. May their tribe increase! 

"Gentleman" Jim Baker, Superintendent 
of Monticello Schools, commends the work of 
the Louisville Hospitality Committee in pro- 
viding additional attractions and conven- 
iences for visiting students to the State 
Tournament. Jim, who will be remembered 
as an outstanding official at the Kentucky 
State High School Tournament, recommends 
that an Abou Ben Adhem Certificate be sent 
to Allen County. Jim said that he witnessed 
a great exhibition of sportsmanship by 200 
fans who traveled over 100 miles from 
Scottsville to play Monticello. These kids 
could not have been other than sportsman- 
like under the type of leadership which Tom 
Simmons, Principal, and Coach Jimmie 
Bazzell give. An Abou Ben Adhem Certifi- 
cate is on its way. 

About this fellow, Tom Simmons! The 
Dutchman will never forget Tom lining up 
a half dozen coaches around Fountain Run 
and Tompkinsville back in 1930 for a fishing 
trip. The Dutchman was to be the "honored 
guest." Tom never did tell the Dutchman 
that it was illegal to go "dipping" until the 
local lawmen took over this phase of his 
education. Those country boys got this city 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 



Page Five 




if 

Wm. mil liiMi 

Donald Richardson 

kid in the water at 7 P. M. and the Dutch- 
man was still wading neck deep in Barren 
River at 4 o'clock the next morning when 
the game warden arrived. 

A sign hanging in "Ole Ben" Edelen's tax 
office is very misleading. It says "This is a 
non profit organization. We didn't intend it 
to be that way but that's how it turned out." 
One glimpse at the referee's new suite of 
offices is enough to convince any skeptic 
that he is in the presence of one of Ken- 
tucky's wealthiest sports officials. 

The five officials, elected by the "Sweet- 
Sixteen" Coaches to officiate the State Tour- 
nament, are hereby notified to meet the Fly- 
ing Dutchman in his offices in the Armory 
at 3 P. M. Central Standard Time on March 
16. Each year before the big classic opens 
the Dutchman has an orientation period vdth 
the "Happy Five." 

Kentucky's basketball officials get the 
"Salute of 1960." They have again done 
themselves proud. To appreciate your home 
you have to go visiting. To appreciate Ken- 
tucky's officials, take your teams to play in 
far-away places. Kentucky's coaches indicate 
that they are 90% satsified with officiating. 
Officials indicate that they are more than 
90% satisfied with the coaches. We are 
just 20% above average and that's good in 
any league. 

John Showalter, fondly known as "Beef" 
to his friends, has been nominated for the 
"Mr. Methusaleh" award. One such award 



will go to an official in each of the 15 basket- 
ball clinics next fall. Who do you know in 
your region with many years behind him 
as a sports official? 

The Dutchman's closing philosophy is for 
Oran Teater, George Conley and Sid Meade 
while they are in the big city for the "Ken- 
tucky Schoolboy Classic." 

"For that rundown feeling, try jaywalk- 
ing." 



1960 TRACK AND FIELD RULES 

RULES REVISIONS, most of which are 
of a minor nature, are outlined in the new 
edition of the Track and Field Rules Book 
which came from the press in January. 

Rule 1-c: Lanes should be marked with a 
material which is not injurious to the eyes 
or the skin. 

Rule 4-Note : A contestant should be limit- 
ed to not more than four events and he should 
not run a distance of 440 yards or over in 
more than one event. 

Rule 6-1: Starter is to now use the word 
"set" in his instruction to the competitors. 

Rule 6-2: (a) Competitors must be "set" 
and motionless for approximately two sec- 
onds before the starter fires the pistol; (b) 
A contestant who leaves his mark with hand 
or foot at the "set" instruction before the 
pistol is fired or without the firing of the 
pistol is charged with a false start. 

Rule 9-1: Trials may be conducted in 
flights of three or more when there is a 
large number of competitors in the high 
jump and for pole vault. 

Rule 9-6 and Equipment Table, page 26: 
The discus throwing sector is now 60 degrees. 

SITUATION RULINGS: New or revised 
situations include 16; 17; 18; 21; 22 and 50. 
These are designed to clarify such matters 
as when a false start is charged and the cir- 
cumstances under which a vault counts as a 
trial if the pole falls forward and touches 
the ground beyond the plane of the stop- 
board. 

The article "Mechanics and Technics of 
Starting" has been rewritten in view of cur- 
rent practices and rules coverage. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 



Schools' Ratings of Football Officials for 1959 



NAME Excel. 

Abele, George F. I 15 

Almon, James H. | 

Alston, E. Deedom 1 3 

Anderson, Bob ' 1 

Anderson, E. W. Jr 1 3 

Atkinson, Charles T. _._| 

Attick, William E. 1 5 

Bach, Leonard 1 1 

Baker, Charles Joe ! 6 

Ballard, Robert A. ! 5 

Barbour, Morris I 

Barlow, Billv I 12 

Barlow, Bob 1 11 



Bartels, John R. 
Baskin, Sylvester 
Bauer, Richard E. . 
Beck, C. Norman . 
Bell, Clarence T. _ 
Bell, Thomas P. _ 
Bennett, Howard "Pete". 



Black, Charles D. I 12 

Blackburn, Adrian I 1 

Blankenbeckler, Ralph B. I 1 

Blanton, Homer | 8 

Boeh, Bill ! 1 

Boemker, Bob | 2 

Bond, Jack C. | 10 

Bonner, John C. I 2 

Bostick, Lord M. Jr. | 15 

Bowman, Earl G. "Dick" i 6 

Boyles, Jerry | 2 

Brandenburg, Donald E. | 21 

Brian, Ted | 

Brichler, Joe A. I 2 

Brizendine, Vic I 10 

Broderick, Carroll A. | 7 

Brotzge, Maurice J. I 4 

Brown, Bill (G. W.) | 7 

Brown, John W. | 7 

Burke, Daniel F. I 4 

Byrd, Harry G. 1 6 

Cain, Paul D. I 3 

Caldwell, Charles M. ___j 1 

Caiman, E. C. Jr. I 3 

Campbell, John J. | 2 

Campbell, William C. | 

Canter, John I 3 

Carlson, David A. I 10 

Can-oil, Thomas J. I 14 

Caruso, J. T. 14 

Cathey, Gene S. 7 

Cecil, A. Morris 4 

Cisco, Robert D. I 6 

Clark, B. W. | 6 

Clark, Owen B. | 4 

Clinard, Fred L. I 7 

Cole, Harold | 1 

Coleman, L. J. "Duke" __| 8 

Corea, Frank | 2 

Corrao, Philip J. | 2 

Coudret, Raymond J., Jr._| 

Coulter, William I 4 

Cowan, Robert L. 2 

Cox, William J. I 2 

Craft, Bill | 12 

Creasey, Fred | 11 

Crosthwaite, John S., Jr.-I 21 

Crouch, Jack . 1 4 



Good Fair Poor 



I 13 


1 


1 5 





3 





1 





6 


2 


1 





4 


2 





1 


10 





10 





3 


3 


6 





9 


1 


6 


2 


5 


1 


5 


1 


9 


2 


5 





1 





7 


2 





, 1 


3 


1 


3 


1 1 


7 





7 





2 





6 


2 


2 





I 7 





9 





4 


4 1 


5 


3 


1 1 





1 





10 





5 


1 


16 





7 


2 


3 


2 


3 


1 


5 





1 





1 





6 


3 


5 


1 


2 





9 


1 


5 





14 


1 


1 


3 


7 





3 





4 





5 


1 


6 





6 











5 


3 


3 


2 








2 





5 





4 





7 





4 


1 


7 





1 


1 1 


4 


1 



NAME 

Crum, Edward E. | 

Gulp, Willard E. i 

Current, Ellis Ray i 

Daniel, Ernest H. 

Davis, Charles A. ' 

Davis, Clyde E. I 

Davis, Webster Curtis --| 

Deaton, Daniel E. 

DeMuth, Paul E. | 

Denton, Charles M. 

Detenber, Gene 

Dial, Jack W. 1 

Dierolf, William H., Jr. __| 

DiMuzio, Robert M. 

Dixie, C. P. 

Dixon, Sam ! 

Dolan, Richard S. "Dick"_| 

Dotson, W. S. ! 

Drake, Richard "Dick" __| 
Duke, J. W., Jr. | 



Durkin, Jack \ 17 



Edelen, Ben R, 
Ellspermann, George A. _| 
Elovitz, Carl I 

Ensslin, Thomas F. I 

Ernst, Edward R. [ 

Falls, William F. | 

Farley, Kenneth 

Faust, Jack | 

Fey, Allen | 

Figg, Charles Raymond i 

Fishback, Olen W. 

Florence, Robert H. 

Forbes, John W. "Jack"-_I 

Fortney, Robert Lee ': 

Foster, Berryman E. | 

Fraley, Bill 

Freese, Oliver T. [ 

Fugate, E. Hugh | 

Funkhouser, Roy A. [ 

Gammon, William H. | 

Gettler, John F. | 

Gibbons, E. G. | 

Giles, J. W. I 

Gluszek, Henry J 
Golden, Billy Joe _ 
Gour, Robert A. . 
Grace, Charles K. 

Grace, Hickory E., Jr. | 

Graham, James E.. 

Greenlee, 0. C. "Doug"-- 

Greenslait, James W. 

Grooms, Randall D. 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr 

Hagan, Joseph "Red" 

Hagerman, Bart 

Hagy, Harold J. | 

Hale, Don C. -_-_ 

Hall, Frank P. | 

Hanes, Edward C. ! 

Harris, Gene ! 

Harris, James B. [ 

Harris, Russell | 

Harrod, Robert | 

Hartig, Malcolm W. | 

Hartley, William E. | 

Hatfield, Cecil E. | 

Hatfield, Gene E. | 



Excel. Good Fair Poor 



7 


1 


7 


1 


3 


2 


7 


1 


1 





5 








1 


2 





4 





2 





2 


2 








1 





1 


1 


4 


2 1 


1 


1 


3 





4 


3 


2 





10 


1 


9 





10 


1 



10 


1 


3 





1 1 





t 3 





1 4 


3 


i 6 


1 


1 3 





6 





1 





1 4 





1 17 





1 11 





1 7 


2 


1 4 





9 


1 


5 


4 


4 


2 


4 


1 


1 8 





1 


1 


1 2 





4 





9 


2 


1 


1 


8 





3 


1 


10 


1 








1 1 





6 


2 


1 14 


2 


9 





1 16 


1 








7 


5 


5 





16 


2 


7 





2 





4 





5 











2 





3 





1 6 






THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 



NAME Excel. 

Hawkins, Robert ] 4 

Heinold, F. Thomas | 3 

Heinold, Jack j 4 

Heinze, Frank | 4 

Heinze, John G. j 7 

Hellard, George D., Jr. __i 5 
Hertzberger, Robert H. _ 1 

Hewling, Richard I 6 

Hofstetter, Joe ] 2 

Hoferer, Louis R. | 11 

Holbrook, William I 5 

Holeman, D. Fletcher \ 5 

Hohnan, S. T. | 4 

Holstein, Herbert B. [ 1 

Howerton, Jack, Jr | 11 

Huiet, Fred "Whitey" __.[ 2 

James, Gene | 1 

Janning, Robert L. | 11 

Jenkins, Kean | 9 

Johnson, Bernard | 6 

Johnson, Frank | 1 

Jones, J. Carl | 6 

Katman, Bernie | 5 

Kauffman, Victor C. j 2 

Kemper, Russ | 9 

Kerr, Kenneth | 2 

Kimble, Frank i 2 

King, Allen | 3 

Knight, James A. I 1 

Kraesig, Charles j 6 

Kyle, Leslie G., Jr. | 5 

Lamb, Billy | 5 

Lancaster, Morris B. [ 3 

Lawson, Carl E. I 13 

Lawson, Leland | 2 

Lee, Charles J. | 

Lenahan, Thomas F. ! 5 

Lewis, Richard O., Jr. | 

Liber, James | 1 

Lohr, Joel D. t 3 

Longenecker, David M. _| 15 

Lowe, Eugene 14 

Lowe, Stanford | 2 

Lucas, Gene T. [ 10 

McClaskey, Booker | 4 

McCoIlum, Robert G. | 8 

McConachie, Byon E. --_| 

McCowan, Connell [ 17 

McDade, C. F. "Mickey". _| 1 

McHenry, Louis P. j 4 

McMullan, Cecil E. ! 1 

McQuilling, Gerald | 

Makepeace, William H., Jr.] 9 

Marsili, Lee A. | 

Martin, Bill I 8 

Massey, Douglas L. [ 5 

Matarazzo, Sal | 4 

Mathis, Curtis W. | 15 

May, E. B., Jr. | 13 

Mayhew, William M. ___l 1 

Mayhugh, Robert L. | 9 

Mayo, Henry L., Jr. | 4 

Meeks, Jack | 13 

Mercke, Frank | 2 

Miller, Sgt. Kenneth H. _-l 2 

Mitchell, Emmett ! 7 

Mitchell, Vyron W.. | 4 

Moellering, Louis H. ' 

Moran, Warren Carl ' 4 

Mordica, William A. ' 1 

Morrisey, Rockne | 1 

Moss, Howard A. [ 10 



Good 

6 I 
2 ! 

1 i 
13 I 
12 

5 I 
4 I 

6 i 

2 i 
I 

13 
10 

4 I 

I 
13 I 

1 I 
I 

5 ! 

7 I 

6 I 
10 
10 

3 

4 I 

3 I 

5 i 
3 

9 I 

2 I 
12 I 

8 

4 I 

7 I 

5 I 
4 I 

2 I 
7 I 
4 t 

3 I 

7 I 

10 i 

11 I 

12 1 

4 i 

2 I 

8 I 
1 

9 I 

I 
11 I 

8 t 

1 I 

3 I 

3 I 

5 ! 

4 I 

I 
4 I 
7 ! 

1 I 

6 I 
6 I 

10 I 

13 I 
4 1 

11 I 
6 I 
1 I 
6 I 
7 

4 
5 



"■air 


Poor 




















5 





3 






































2 


3 





1 


1 


1 























1 


1 


2 


1 


1 





2 

















2 





1 











2 





1 





2 





1 





1 





4 


1 


3 








1 


2 


1 


1 





1 





1 











1 





1 





2 














1 


1 


1 








1 





1 
































1 





1 


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5 


2 


1 





4 





3 











4 





3 











3 





1 





1 





1 











1 





2 


1 











1 



NAME 

Moss, James W. 

Mudd, Ed 

Mullins, B. E. 

Muntan, P. J. 

Mussman, Ralph, Jr. _ 

Myers, Lee E. 

Nau, Bill 

Neal, Gene 

Noland, Douglas 

Nord. Ed 

Oakley, William D. -- 

Omer, Billy W. 

O'Nan, Norman 

O'Neal, Bud 

Osborne, Ted 

Overby, H. E. 

Palmer, Carl A. 

Parker, Billy E. 

Parsley, Clyde E. 

Pate, Lloyd W. 

Peden, Harlan C. 

Peeno, Harry R. 

Pence, William M. 

Perkins, Billy 

Perry, Alfred L. 

Perry, L. J. 

Pinson, Eugene 

Poore, William E. 

Powell, Logan 

Raisor, J. T. 

Raitt, William C. 

Ray, Shirley G. 

Reddington, James T. . 

Reece, Fred 

Reed, Gordon "Moe" _. 
Reinhart, Eugene A. . 

Renfro, John E. 

Rentz, Thomas W. 

Rhatigan, Alfred J. _. 

Richards, Jim S. 

Riddle, Maurice 

Riggins, Jason 

Riggs, William T. 

Rocke, James M. 

Rogers, Harry K., Jr. . 

Rogers, J. B. 

Rolph, Harold J. 

Rudolph, Fred, Jr. 

Russell, Charles B., Jr. 

Russell, Joe 

Sabato, Al 

Sacra, Gresham 

St. Charles, Thomas A. 

Sanders, Mel I 

Sauter, Harold S. | 

Saylor, Ben H. I 

Saylor, Deward | 

Saylor, Emanuel j 

Scharfenberger, Irvin T._ 

Sehellhase, David 1 

Schlich, Paul 

Schmitt, Karl F. 

Schutz, John J., Jr. __. 

Scott, Luther | 

Scott, W. L. I 

Selvy, Curt | 

Shaw, John H. 

Shaw, Stanley E. 

Showalter, John 

Shumate, Roy V. 

Sinclair, George H. __. 
Sizemore, Dewey 



Excel. 

5 

2 

2 

4 
10 

1 
24 
23 

5 
15 

1 

5 

5 

4 

8 

7 

2 

9 

6 
11 

6 

1 

5 

6 

1 



1 
11 

5 

3 

2 

1 

1 
10 

4 

5 

7 

9 

1 



7 



4 

2 





3 

2 

17 
10 

3 

5 

6 

4 

6 

7 
14 
14 

6 

2 

4 



Good 

7 

5 

6 
18 

5 

1 

4 

2 

5 
22 

2 

7 

4 

9 

7 

4 


11 

7 

2 

7 

2 

3 

6 

5 

5 
12 

4 
10 

8 



4 

4 

3 

7 

4 

3 

6 

3 

1 

7 



9 

9 

5 

1 



7 
14 
10 



9 

5 

4 
17 

1 

5 

5 I 

1 

2 I 
12 I 



8 




3 





4 


6 


6 


18 


10 


6 


5 


8 


5 


11 


2 


1 


2 


4 


6 


6 


4 



Page Seven 


Fair 


Poor 


1 











2 


1 





2 


1 


1 


1 





2 


1 














1 


1 


2 





1 








1 





1 


1 

















3 























1 





1 





1 





1 








1 








3 








1 














1 








1 


1 

















1 


1 











1 














2 





3 














1 














3 


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3 


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1 

















4 











4 


1 


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1 











5 



































2 














4 


1 





3 












Page Eight 

NAME 

Skinner, Earnest 

Sloan, Earl Dean 

Sloan, Wallv 

Smith, Edgar J. 

Smith, J. E. 

Smith, Walter K. 

Smithson, Richard A. 

Snider, Louis Gene 

Snook, Patrick 

Steele, Charles S. _ — 

Stephenson, B. H. 

Stephenson, Harry 

Stevens, William D. _ 
Stewart, Herbert T. „ 

Stone, Clifton 

Stone, Robert E. 

Strong, Arnett 

Sullivan, Don C. 

Swope, William 

Taylor, Dennis H. 

Taylor, James R. 

Thompson, Jack, Jr. __ 

Thompson, Jack 

Thurman, J. W. 

Treas, Joe W. 

Trunzo, Nicholas P. __ 

Vance, Wendell R. 

VanKirk, Alvis S. _ — 
VanMeter, David G. _ 
VanMeter, John W., Jr, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 



Excel. 


Good 


Fair 


Poor 





4 








8 


2 


1 


1 


7 


22 








12 


8 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


4 


1 


1 





4 








2 


1 


1 





1 


2 





2 


1 











2 


4 


1 





15 


8 


1 





4 


10 








1 


3 








1 


4 








6 


4 


1 





9 


4 








7 


13 


2 








1 


1 





2 








2 





6 








14 


16 





1 


20 


22 








27 


8 


1 


1 


6 


6 





1 








1 


1 


1 


5 


1 


2 


3 


6 








5 


7 


1 





2 


12 


2 






NAME Excel. 

Varner, Ray I 8 | 

Vennari, Paul | 2 | 

Waide, Harry D. | 5 | 

Walker, Paul R. I 9 

Wanchic, Nicholas \ 10 

3 
5 

2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
5 
4 
1 
1 
2 
4 
6 
3 
4 
2 



Watson, Ronald L. 

Watts, Shirley Ray ! 

Weber, David | 

Weber, Edward H. | 

Weisbrodt, Paul E. | 

Welch, Tom | 

Werkowitz, Jack | 

Whipple, Lloyd G. | 

White, Harlie, Jr. | 

White, James E. | 

Wigginton, Allen M., Sr._| 

Willey, Harold L. | 

Williams, Bert O. ] 

Williams, James H. | 

Williams, Reid V. 

Williams, Roy E. | 

Williams, Smythe Jack I 

Wilson, Jack R. I 

Wilson, John Pope | 

Winfrey, Shelby I 4 

Wise, Billy I 5 

Wise, Jack j 4 

Womack, William H. __.| 6 
Wurtz, Emil | 



Good 

6 

1 

7 
17 

9 



8 

2 

1 

4 

8 

3 

1 

5 



8 



5 

6 

4 

6 





5 

4 
10 

6 

7 

1 



air 


Poor 


2 


2 


1 




















1 


























2 


1 


2 
































3 











1 


2 











2 





3 











5 


3 


5 














1 















Football Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A. 
Member Schools^-1959 



SCHOOL 



Anderson (Lawrenceburg) 

Ashland 

Attacks (Hopkinsville) 

Austin Tracy (Lucas) 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Beechwood (S. Ft. Mitchell). 

Belfry 

Bell County (Pineville) 

Bellevue 

Benham 



Be 

Black Star (Alva)_. 

Boone County (Flo 

Bowling Green 

Bryan Station (Lexington) 

Butler (Louisville) 

Caldwell County (Princeton) 

Campbell County (Alexandria) - 

Campbellsville 

Camp Dick Robinson 

Carlisle 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna (Horse Cave) 

Central (Louisville) 

Corbin 

Crittenden County (Marion) 

Cumberland 

Cynthii 



Danville 

Daviess County (Owensboro) 

Dayton 

DeSales (Louisville) 

Dilce Combs Memorial (Jeff) 

Dixie Heights (So. Ft. Mitchell). 

Douglass (Henderson) 

Douglass (Murray) 

DuBois (Mt. Sterling) 

duPont Manual (Louisville) 

Durrett (Louisville) 

Eastern (Middletown) 

East Main Street (Lynch) 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 





COACH 




OTHER 


SCHOOL 
























OFFICIALS 




CROWD 






TEAM 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E G F P 


E 


G P 


P 


E 


G F 


11 


12 


2 





11 


8 


1 





12 


11 


1 


1 


11 


13 


1 


32 
12 


3 
2 


1 



1 




33 
12 


1 
2 


2 



1 




29 

11 


3 






1 



31 
12 


6 
2 


1 




19 
24 


4 











19 
24 


1 









u 




18 
20 


5 
3 








1 


20 
23 


3 

1 






15 


4 








15 


4 








13 


6 








16 


3 





20 


4 








20 


3 


1 





20 


4 








19 


3 


2 


23 
35 


3 

1 



4 




1 


23 
40 


3 









1 


14 
39 


9 
1 


3 





1 


15 
36 


8 
4 


3 

1 


22 
19 


4 
4 



2 



2 


26 
24 






2 


u 
n 


22 
23 


3 
3 


1 

1 






21 
21 


5 
6 




1 


11 


1 








11 


1 








6 


6 








10 


2 





25 
27 
26 
17 



4 
5 



5 





1 


1 




30 
24 
28 
16 




7 
4 
1 


1 











20 
22 
25 
17 


1 
8 
6 



5 

1 
1 



5 





19 
23 
22 
15 


2 

8 
10 
1 


4 




1 


31 
26 


5 

8 


2 
1 


1 
1 


33 
31 


6 
5 










29 

28 


9 

7 




1 






30 
23 


6 
9 


3 
4 


27 


9 








30 


7 





II 


25 


9 


1 


1 


22 


12 


1 


27 


1 








25 


3 








24 


4 








26 


2 





4 


3 


1 





6 


2 





II 


6 


2 








6 


2 





23 


2 








22 


3 





II 


19 


6 








20 


4 


1 


18 


7 


2 





18 


8 


1 





11 


12 


4 





10 


13 


4 


19 


7 


1 


1 


22 


4 


1 


II 


17 


7 


3 


1 


18 


9 


1 


19 


23 





4 


21 


23 





2 


17 


27 


2 





16 


26 


1 


38 


6 








38 


6 








39 


5 








40 


4 





11 


15 


5 


3 


17 


14 


2 





11 


11 


7 


5 


12 


16 


3 


22 


4 


1 





26 


1 








23 


2 


2 





23 


4 





19 


4 








20 


3 





1) 


19 


4 








17 


5 


1 


30 


2 








31 


1 








28 


4 








28 


4 





17 


9 


2 





17 


in 


1 





14 


13 


1 





9 


14 


2 


28 


2 


2 





26 


6 








20 


10 


2 





16 


11 


3 


26 


5 


2 


2 


27 


5 


3 





25 


7 


3 





26 


6 


3 


7 











6 


1 





II 


7 











6 





1 


25 


5 








25 


6 


n 


II 


23 


4 


8 





24 


4 


1 


18 


6 








13 


11 





II 


11 


13 








14 


10 





10 








4 


14 


4 








9 


G 


3 





13 


4 


1 


9 


11 








10 


10 





II 


7 


13 








8 


12 





33 


« 


1 





31 


9 








31 


7 


2 





32 


7 


1 


21 


6 


3 





22 


7 


2 





20 


10 


1 





22 


8 


1 


27 


fi 








31 


2 








29 


4 








29 


3 


1 


26 


4 








28 


2 





II 


26 


2 


2 





26 


1 


1 


24 


6 








27 


3 








26 


4 








27 


4 


1 


31 











30 





1 


(1 


27 


4 








26 


I 2 


3 


7 


4 


1 


1 


12 





1 





7 


3 


3 





4 


6 


2 


30 


1 


1 


1 


32 


1 





u 


30 


1 





■^ 


31 


1 






THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 



Page Nine 



SCHOOL 



FairdaJe 

Fern Creek 

Flaget (Louisville) 

Fleming-Neon (Fleming) 

Ft. Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin County (Frankfort) 

Franklin-Simpson (Franklin) 

Fulton 

Gamaliel 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Hall (Grays Knob) 

Harlan 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green (East Eernstadt) 

Henderson 

Henderson County (Henderson). 

Henry Clay (Lexington) 

Highlands (Ft. Thomas) 

High Street ( Bowling Green) 



Hii 



ille- 



Atherton (Louisville). 



Jessamnie County (Nicholasville) _ 

Ky. Mill. Inst. (Lyndon) 

Knox Central (Barbourville) 

Lafayette (Lexington) 

Lancaster 

LaRue County (Hodgenville) 

Lebanon 

Leslie County (Hyden) 

Lily 

Lincoln (Franklin) 

Lincoln (Padueah) 

Lincoln Inst. (Lincoln Ridge) 

Lloyd Memorial (Erlanger) 

London 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp (Corbin) 

McKell (South Shore) 

Madison Model (Richmond) 

Madisonville 

Male (Louisville) 

Mayfield 

M. C. Napier (Hazard) 

Metcalfe County (Edmonton) 

Middlesboro 

Millersburg Mili. Inst 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Oldham County (LaGrange) 

Old Ky. Home (Bardstown) 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Padueah Tilghman 

Paint Lick 

Paints ville 

Paris 

Park City 

P. L. Dunbar (Lexington) 

Perryville 

Pikeville 

Pineville _ 

Pleasure Ridge Park 

Prestonsburg 

Providence 

Raceland 

Rosen wald (Harlan) 

Rosenwald (Lebanon) 

Russell 

Russellville 

St. Joseph Prep. (Bardstown) 

St. Xavier (Louisville) 

Seneca (Louisville) 

Shawnee (Louisville) 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Somerset 

Southern (Louisville) 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Temple Hill (Glasgow) 

Tompkinsville 

Trigg County (Cadiz) 

Trinity (Louisville) 

Valley (Valley Station) 



2 





1 


■,u 


7 





111 


8 





2K 


3 


1 


]•/. 


6 





■M 


3 


1 


11 


4 


3 


an 


4 


2 


H« 


4 





IS 


2 





27 


3 


1 


■M 


10 





H(] 


3 


1 


H2 


1 


1 


2;h 


7 





■M 


2 


1 1 


2(1 


2 





■Ml 


3 


1 


!l 


16 


2 1 


XS 


2 


1 


:H7 





1 


IS 


5 


1 


in 


7 


1 


2K 


3 


1 1 


X\ 


8 


1 


» 


7 


5 1 


an 


6 


2 1 


2t; 





1 


k; 


3 


1 1 


21 


2 


1 1 


25 


1 





K 


9 


6 


IK 


4 





X 


1 


1 


1(1 


9 





2« 


6 


1 


IV 


6 


1 


in 


4 





^« 








H 


7 


2 


2(1 


9 


1 


4;i 


1 





K 


8 


5 


17 


5 


1 


25 


1 





nil 


4 


1 


IH 


3 


2 


15 


10 


1 


22 


2 


1 


2K 


12 





27 


4 





25 


1 





2il 


2 


1 


12 


3 





2(i 





1 


IK 


10 


1 


24 


10 


1 i 


HII 


3 


2 


12 


(1 





H7 


3 





20 


3 





z:f 


1 





24 


5 





2(1 


9 


4 


2H 


6 





15 


K 





IH 


5 


1 


5 


4 


2 


2K 


1 


3 


24 


4 





2(1 


1 





X 


8 





5 


7 


1 


21 


1 


1 


2H 


2 


1 


7 


2 





2fi 


1 





2H 


11 





15 


9 


1 


V 


1 


1 


(i 


2 





12 


7 


1 


2B 


12 





2:i 


6 





:u 


9 


1 


Hfi 


2 





29 


6 


2 


2!) 


6 


1 


17 


8 


1 


;<H 


2 





2» 


7 


1 


15 


11 


1 


19 


4 





H2 


2 





15 


6 


3 


22 


1 





2fi 


5 





21 


fi 


1 


27 


4 


1 



HER SCHOOL 
OFFICIALS 




CROWD 






TEAM 


G 


F 


1' 


E 


G 


K 


P 


E 


G F 


1 


1 





2 








1 


2 








1 6 








32 


6 








34 


3 





1 8 





2 


16 


9 





1 


16 


8 


1 


1 1 








28 


1 


3 





21 


4 


5 


1 5 





3 


10 


7 


II 


1 


11 


4 


1 


1 6 








16 


7 


1 





11 


8 


1 


1 6 


1 





14 


6 





(1 


13 


7 





1 4 








23 


7 


2 





30 


2 





1 2 








36 


3 


1 





35 


4 


1 


1 2 








13 


2 








12 


3 





1 8 








23 


7 








21 


8 


1 


1 6 








25 


8 








22 


11 





1 1 








32 


2 


1 





30 


5 





1 1 


(I 





31 


2 








29 


4 





1 5 








24 


5 


(1 


1 


23 


7 





1 








27 


1 


2 





29 


2 





1 2 








17 


6 








18 


4 





1 2 








27 


6 








29 


4 





1 14 








14 


15 





2 


8 


20 


3 


1 2 








24 


2 


(I 





22 


2 


1 


1 1 


1 





34 


3 


1 





35 


2 





1 4 





u 


11 


9 


2 





12 


9 


1 


1 4 








9 


10 


3 


1 


12 


11 





1 5 








27 


4 








26 


5 





2 








32 


6 


1 





31 


8 





4 








17 


4 


4 





15 


6 


2 


7 


1 


(1 


36 


5 


2 


2 


37 


6 














25 


1 








25 





1 


4 








17 


3 





1 


16 


5 





1 3 








20 


4 








19 


5 





1 








24 


1 


1 





25 


1 





8 








15 


11 








13 


12 


1 


8 





2 


12 


6 


1 


5 


13 


7 


1 


2 


1 


1 


7 


2 


1 





7 


3 





5 





1 


13 


6 


1 


1 


14 


fi 





2 





1 


29 


4 





1 


25 


6 





5 








17 


6 


1 


1 


20 


3 


2 










10 


5 





1 


10 


6 


1 










11 


2 








11 


2 





10 


1 


4 


4 


14 


1 


3 


7 


11 


1 




1 





22 


7 


(I 


2 


16 


12 


1 







(1 


43 


1 


II 





43 


1 





9 


1 


(1 


10 


7 


6 





9 


6 


8 


4 





u 


18 


4 


1 





18 


5 













25 





1 





24 


1 


1 


5 





(» 


29 


5 


1 





29 


5 


1 


2 








21 


2 








19 


3 





5 








11 


11 


4 





13 


9 


4 


3 








20 


5 








22 


2 


1 


12 








20 


16 


2 


2 


19 


19 


2 


3 








26 


5 








26 


5 





2 








23 


3 








23 


3 





4 


1 


3 


27 


4 


2 


3 


18 


8 


5 


4 








12 


2 


1 





11 


3 


1 











24 


1 


2 





24 


1 


2 


10 


1 


2 


18 


11 


2 





16 


7 


5 


9 


2 


1 


20 


11 


3 


3 


20 


15 


1 


6 


1 





30 


6 








32 


4 





1 








5 


7 








10 


?. 





2 








33 


7 








33 


4 


3 


2 








24 


4 


1 





25 


4 





1 








18 


« 








21 


3 





5 








24 


5 








24 


3 


1 


9 





1 


25 


9 


(I 


1 


22 


12 





9 








19 


10 








18 


11 





7 








12 


6 


1 


2 


9 


9 


1 


1 





(1 


20 


2 








19 


3 





1 


1 





5 


3 


1 


2 


5 


6 





5 


1 


(1 


24 


7 





1 


23 


7 


2 


8 








17 


11 








17 


10 


1 


1 








19 


2 








13 


8 





8 








7 


9 








6 


10 





5 








4 


7 


2 


1 


5 


7 


2 


7 


1 





18 


7 


2 


3 


15 


6 


4 











21 


3 


1 


1 


24 


1 


1 1 


2 








6 


2 


1 





6 


?. 














23 


4 


(I 





26 


1 





12 





(1 


14 


19 


(1 


1 


17 


16 





7 





1 


8 


15 


1 





13 


11 


1 1 


1 


1 





7 


1 


1 


II 


8 


1 


1 1 


2 





1 


5 


3 





1 


3 


5 


1 


7 








16 


16 


(I 





11 


10 


1 1 


7 


1 





27 


10 


II 


1 


21 


10 


2 1 


4 


1 





24 


4 


1 


1 


24 


5 


1 1 


8 








30 


10 


1 





35 


6 


1 


4 








33 


5 








32 


6 


1 


2 


1 


1 


29 


6 


2 





32 


4 


1 1 


10 





() 


26 


10 








26 


11 


1 


1 6 








19 


5 


3 





14 


7 


3 1 


3 





2 


23 


9 


3 





27 


6 


1 


1 4 








34 


4 








33 


6 


1 


1 11 





(1 


15 


12 








14 


10 


3 1 


1 4 





II 


18 


5 








17 


6 


1 


1 4 





II 


25 


9 


(1 





26 


8 


" 1 


1 5 





(1 


18 


10 


1 





14 


10 


1 


1 1 


1 





17 


4 


2 





19 


4 


1 


1 9 


n 


(1 


16 


11 


3 


1 


20 


11 


1 


1 ^ 


1 





20 


7 


1 





19 


8 


1 1 


\ 4 








27 


4 








27 


4 


1 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 



SCHOOL 

Wurtland 

Versailles 

Waggener (Louisville) 

Wallins (Wallins Creek) 

Warren County (Bowling G 

Western (Owensboro) 

Western (Paris) 

West Main Street (Lynch). 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Winchester 




Team Scoring— 1960 Kentucky State High School 
Swimming Meet — Class A 



EVENT 



TEAM 
St. X Waggener Lafayette Atherton Bryan Sta. Eastern Henry Clay 



400 Yar(i Freestyle 

50 Yard Freestyle 

100 Yard Butterfly 

200 Yard Freestyle 

100 Yard Backstroke 

100 Yard Breaststroke 

100 Yard Freestyle 

Fancy Diving 

200 Yard Individual Medley 

200 Yard Medley Relay 

200 Yard Freestyle Relay. 
Total Points 



9 
9 

7 
6 
9 
5 
2 
5 
12 
14 
8 
86 





7 
4 


1 

3 

6 

10 
31 



FILMS 

(Continued from Page Three) 

The Umpire In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Summarizes importance of the umpire to the base- 
ball game. Explanation of the duties of umpire and 
also qualifications for job, showing where they re- 
ceive their training. 

World Series of 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

Highlights of the games between the Cleveland 
Indians and the New York Giants are shown in this 
film. The Giants, sparked by the sensational hitting 
of Rhodes, defeated the Indians in four straight games. 
The Indians had set a record for the number of games 
won in winning the American League Pennant. 

World Series of 1955, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

Exciting moments of the seven games between the 
Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees are 
shown in this film. The cojiimentary leading up 
to each game makes the film interesting as the 
Dodgers win the world championship. 

World Series of 1957, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

The American League champion New York Yankees, 
carry the series the full seven games before bowing 
to the Milwaukee Braves, champion of the National 
League. The film catches most of the hitting and 
shows the plays in which runs were scored in each 
game. The narrator, Lew Fonseca, describes the play 
and fills in the background with interesting bits of 
inforination concerning the games. . 



World Series of 1959, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $.75 

The highlights of the six games played in the series 
between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Cleveland 
Indians are shown in this film. Most of the scoring 
plays are filmed, along with many of the outstanding 
defensive plays. The color that goes with these games 
is captured in the film. 

Baseball Hall of Fame, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

This film shows the annual meeting at Cooperstown, 
New York, when new names are ad(ted to the Hall 
of Fame list. Numerous stars of the past return 
to the shrine each year at this time, and are shown 
as their feats on the diamond are related. The history 
of Cooperstown and the purpose of the Hall of Fame 
are explained in the picture. 

Tennis 

Advanced Tennis, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

While working with a tennis pupil. Bill Tilden 
narrates and demonstrates, showing advanced tech- 
niques of tennis. 

Tennis Rhythm, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Bobby Riggs is shown winning national tennis 
championship of Forest Hills. Later, at his tennis 
school in Chicago, he demonstrates how to make var- 
ious shots correctly — the grip, sei-vice, forehand drive, 
backhand, etc., using regular speed and slow motion. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 



Page Eleven 



Golf 

Saving Strokes with Sam Snead, s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Golf champion Sam Snead illustrates his grip, his 
stance, his swing on each of several types of golf 
situations. Slow motion and "freeze" shots help to 
clarify the instruction. Shots with driver, brassie, and 
various irons for difficult lies are illustrated and 
finally his putting technique is shown. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled March 1) 



mber is given for an official listed, it is 
ir unless otherwise designated. If two 
first number is that of the home pho 



Hour 



Lancaste 



If one teleph^ 
the home phone 
numbers are give 

Butner, William M., Route 2, c/o Jul: 

528 R. 757 
Flaugher, Allen, Route 1, Brooksville. RE 5-2924, CO 1-5 
Grooms, Roger C, 311 Linwood, Cincinnati, Ohio. TR 1-2' 

BE 1-8293 
Hall, C. E., Jr., Raceland, North 702 
Jones, Paul. 156 Washington St., Hamilton, Ohio 
O'Connell, James M.. 586 Dorgene. Cincinnati 44, Ohio 
South, William F., 180 Versailles Road, Frankfort. 7-6565 
VanHoose, Jimmy Lee, Euclid Ave,, Paintsville, 786, 9105 
VanHoose, Edgar N., Nippa, 1168 
Watts, Shirley, 802 Carneal Rd„ Lexington, 5-2743, 2-6494 



1960 BASEBALL RULES REVISIONS 

These Baseball Comments apply to the 
1960 rules as authorized by the National 
Alliance Baseball committee representing 
the National Federation, National Associa- 
tion of Intercollegiate Athletics and the Na- 
tional Junior College Athletic Association. 

1. The Catcher must be in his box when a 
pitch leaves the Pitcher's hand. Neither of 
the Catcher's feet may be outside the limits 
of the box. Any infraction is considered an 
illegal pitch if there are no base runners 
and a balk if there are runners. 

2. In making an appeal play, the Umpire's 
attention must be called to it before the time 
of the next pitch or, if a half-inning is end- 
ing, before the infielders leave the diamond. 

3. The substitution rule requires that, in 
addition to giving the Chief Umpire his name 
and shirt number, the substitute must also 
name the player he is replacing in the batting 
order and indicate the position he will play in 
the field. The 1960 Code includes only one 
optional reentry modification. This optional 
provision, when used, provides that only the 
nine starting players may withdraw and re- 
enter once, provided each player occupies 
the same batting position whenever he is in 
the lineup. 

4. If a Coach confers with a Pitcher or 
other defensive player more than once in 
an inning, or more than three times in a 
game, the Pitcher shall be replaced as Pitch- 
er. The replaced Pitcher may participate 
in another position but he may not again 
pitch. 



5. When obstruction occurs, the ball does 
not immediately become dead. If offended 
runner and each other runner reaches the 
base each would probably have reached ex- 
cept for the obstruction, the penalty is ig- 
nored. Otherwise, Umpire awards such base 
or bases to runner or runners. If award is to 
be made, ball becomes dead when time is 
taken to make the award. 

RECOMMENDATION : E-xperim.entation 
with the provision that all base runners wear 
a head protector which covers the top of the 
head, base of the skull and the temples. 



RECOGNIZE YOUR CHAMPIONS 

Tipp City High Schools boasts an unique 
and inexpensive method of stimulating phy- 
sical education and intra-mural programs. A 
strength and efficiency chart has evolved 
after seven years development. It is now ac- 
cepted as the ideal solution for activity recog- 
nition. 

The idea of the chart is to list names of 
champions in various categories for public 
notice. The method described in the next few 
paragraphs requires a low investment of 
finances and only a small amount of effort to 
maintain after it is once established. About 
four hours work each year keep records up 
to date in Tipp City. 

The chart itself is composed of a frame- 
work approximately twenty feet by four feet 
attached securely to the wall of the gymnas- 
ium. Within the framework moveable panels 
are inserted measuring approximately twelve 
inches square. The framework was grooved 
to allow the insertion of the one-quarter inch 
masonite panels. These were purchased in 
three sheets, four feet by eiofht feet long, 
and spray painted white for backgi-ound. 

Lettering on the panels has been done by 
a small brush with a different colored paint 
(poster paint, airplane dope, India ink, and 
enamels all work well) selected for each ac- 
tivity. The lettering itself was done in small 
block letters as is shown in the pictures. 

The chart in Tipp has two length-wise 
units of the boys' activities and one for girls'. 
These male activities are boxing, wrestling, 
volleyball, basketball, chins, dips, jump and 
reach, standing broad jump, rope climb, 
tumbling, sit-ups, mile run, and strength and 
efficiency champion for the boys. 

Included in the girls' chart are standing 
hroad jump, basketball throw, soccer kick, 
tumbling, push-ups, sit-ups, block run, jump 
and reach, posture, G. A. A. outstanding 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1960 




Don't Delay... 

WHY NOT WRITE US ABOUT YOUR 
ATHLETIC AND STUDENT ACCI- 
DENT INSURANCE FOR 1960-61? 

Our Policies have been approved by 
The Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association and are underwritten by 
a Kentucky Company. 




KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND 



ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



^Ue KittCfJUn Qo'mfia4i4f, 



W. E. KINGSLEY 
608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Spec. Agt. 
LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 

CHARLES C. PRICE 
PHONE 2-8522 



girl, and strength and efficiency champion 
of the girls. 

This chart is flexible enough to allow for 
approximately ten years accumulative 
records in all events. Each panel is large 
enough to record the year, name, and record 
of the individual event. 

The idea could be adapted to a varsity pro- 
gram of track and field records, football, 
basketball, and baseball team members and 
records as well as a physical education pro- 
gram. The gymnasium in Tipp City also has 
a dual function of auditorium so that the 
chart had to meet acceptable decorative 
standards. This chart meets all the require- 
ments for both taste and program stimula- 
tion. 

If more specific details concerning the idea 
are desired, write William J. Parrish, Direc- 
tor of Health and Physical Education, Tipp 
City Schools, Tipp City, Ohio. —William Par- 
rish in the OHIO HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE. 



GUEST EDITORIAL 

(Continued from Page One) 

ing concern nationally from grade school to 
college. Most of us have not looked upon the 



"short cuts" as an evil influence. They have 
been passed down from man to man, mouth 
to ear, boy to boy without considering the 
far reaching influence upon the boys of to- 
day or the men of tomorrow. 

School authorities and patrons must dis- 
continue placing too much emphasis on the 
score of the game. Do not force coaches to 
encourage or countenance willful violations. 
If the final score of the game is the only big 
reason for the contest, then we should dis- 
continue our athletic program. We should 
teach proper adherence to the rules and de- 
mand that type of officiating in our games. 
Get rid of those who cannot or will not con- 
form to such a philosophy. 

Those of us who are interested in the fu- 
ture of boys and the games they play must 
combine our efforts to rectify these evils 
that have crept into our program. 

We must have a goal that is greater than 
the one at the end of the football field, the 
goal that is on the backboard at the end of 
the basketball court, a goal that is greater 
than the "pot of gold" at the end of the rain- 
bow. — S. D. Jackson (Tennessee), Member 
National Alliance Football Rules Comnuttee. 



We SHipfiie DaV You BuV" 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY MARCH 16, 17, 18, 19 

See HUNT'S representatives, Roy Boyd, Ed Hendley and C. A. Byrn at 
the Kentucky Hotel. 

We will have a complete showing of Spring and Summer and Fall and 
Winter lines at that time. 

K. E. A. 

When in Louisville for the K. E. A. be sure to visit HUNT'S Display 
Quarters in the Kentucky Hotel on April 20, 21 and 22. 

We again will be there — Roy Boyd, Ed Hendley and C. A. Byrn to show 
you our complete Spring and Summer, Fall and Winter merchandise. 

For those who cannot see them during the State Tournament, please 
make our room your headquarters at that time. 

BASEBALL EQUIPMENT 

HUNT'S has in STOCK baseball uniforms, two-piece shirt and pants, 
trimmed ready for immediate lettering to your specifications at prices 
$7.95, $9.95, $11.95, $13.95. Swatches or samples sent promptly upon 
request. 

Caps, stockings, belts, shoes, all in several price ranges and all top quality 
ready for immediate delivery. 

BASEBALLS 

Reach American League baseball, MacGregor No. 97 official KHSAA 
baseballs, Hunt's official League balls, at all prices from $1.60 each up 
to $2.35 each. ; .1 i. J 

LOUISVILLE SLUGGER BATS 

No. 125 and No. 150, No. 140 and plenty of lower price bats in good supply 
for immediate delivery. Call on Hunt's for "WE SHH* THE DAY YOU 
BUY" Service for all types of Spring and Summer athletic and recreational 
equipment. 

We are at your service. 



^^f^ Sutcliffe always has them-'on timet 

[baseball uniforms 

IN STOCK FOR 

IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY 




2 PIECE SUITS - SHIRTS & PANTS 

?9.00 — $10.50 - $13.00 — $16.95 

Swatches of Fabric in Each Price 
Range Sent Promptly Upon Request 

We have in stock several grades in 
Caps, Belts and Stockings. These are 
shown in our NEW 1960 Athletic Cat- 
alog which you should have. 



K. E. A. When in Louisville be sure to visit Sutcliffe's Display quarters 
at Room 812, Kentucky Hotel, April 20-21-22. See, inspect and order 
your athletic goods equipment for Summer, for next Fall and next year. 

• •* STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT *** 

Louisville March 16-17-18-19 

See SUTCLIFFE REPRESENTATIVES 

Room 812, KENTUCKY HOTEL 



Reach American League Baseballs, each $2.35 Spalding^ National League Baseballs, each $2.35 

Wilson American Ass'n Baseballs, each $2.35 Sutcliffe Official League Baseballs, each $1.75 

LOUISVILLE SLUGGER BATS 

No. 125 - Natural White Ash, each $3.50 No. 150 - White Ash, each $2.70 

Plenty of lower price Bats also in Stock for At Once Delivery 

Write to Sutcliffe for complete illustrated, descriptive Catalog and listing 

of school prices on Jbaseball, soft ball, track, tennis and golf. 

UTCLIFFE CO. 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 





High School Athlete 



FLAGET HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION — 1960 





fur- 

.^ ;: 
^ S 

(Left to Right) Coach Jim Morris, Jim Thomas, Bob Doutaz, James Mont- 
gomery, Tom Finnegan, Don Wilder, Ted Deeken, Don Kalmey, Lou Lange, Buddy 
Weihe, John McGill, Roddy McNemey, Assistant Coach Denny Nash. 

District Tournament Games Won Regional Tournament Games Won 

Flaget 58-49 St. Xavier Flaget 59-51 Manual 

Flaget 69-84 Central Flaget 58-49 Central 

Flaget 56-52 Butler 

Omcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

APRIL - ISBD 



J^ 




Monticello— Runner-Up 
1960 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jack Edwards, Jimmy Duncan, Paul Frye, Jimmy Frazier, Henderson 
Eads, Wendell Barnes. Back Row: Kenneth Kennedy, Gene Pendleton, Kay Morris, Don Frye, 
Samuel Keith, Junior Peyton, Coach Joe Harper. 

Owensboro— Third Place Winner 
1960 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Roy Woodward, Johnny Harralson, Victor Petty, Alan Emerson, Richard Ander- 
son, Jan Adelman, David Yewell, Jerry Brooks, William Carpenter, Randy Embry, Richy Nash, 
Ben Warren, 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XXII— No. 9 



APRIL, 1960 



1.00 Per Year 



1960 Annual Meeting 

The business meeting of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association will be 
held on Thursday, April 21, at 2:30 P. M. 
The place will be the Crystal Ballroom at the 
Brown Hotel, Louisville. The dinner meet- 
ing will be held in the same room at 6 :00 P.M. 

The principal speaker at the dinner meet- 
ing will be Dr. Adron Doran, President of 
Morehead State College. The presentation 
of the Game Guy Award will be made during 
the meeting. The program will also Include 
entertainment features. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of 
the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution, the following 
changes in the By-Laws, to be acted upon by 
the Delegate Assembly, are hereby submitted 
to all members of the K.H.S.A.A. for their 
consideration. 

PROPOSAL I 

The Board of Control proposes that the 
following be added to By-Law 37; "except 
that this exemption shall apply only to full 
boarding students. A school violating this 
rule shall be suspended from the Associa- 
tion." 

PROPOSAL II 

The Board of Control proposes that "nine- 
teenth" be substituted for "twentieth" in 
By-Law 4, with the provision that this 
change, if adopted, not be put into effect 
until July 1, 1961. 

PROPOSAL III 

Supt. Tom L. Gabbard (Silver Grove) pro- 
poses that By-Law 3 be amended by inserting 
"and including" between "to" and "Monday" 
in the first sentence of the By-Law (for 
clarification) . 

PROPOSAL IV 

Supt. Tom L. Gabbard proposes that By- 
Law 26 be amended by adding the following : 
"and the official shall notify the opposing 
school of his intent to officiate the game at 
least fifteen days before the date of the 
game." 

PROPOSAL V 

Supt. Tom L. Gabbard proposes that the 
following be added as Section 12 of By-Law 

(Continued on Page Four) 



BOARD MEMBERS ELECTED 




Cecil A. Thornton Gran C. Teater 

Assistant Superintendent Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton of the Harlan County Schools and Super- 
intendent Oran C. Teater of the Paintsville 
City Schools will represent Sections 7 and 8 
respectively on the Board of Control for a 
four-year period, beginning July 1, 1960. 
Mr. Thornton is beginning his second four- 
year term of Board membership, and Mr. 
Teater will be a new member. 

After graduation from the Newport (Ten- 
nessee) High School, Thornton continued his 
studies at Tennessee Wesleyan and Union 
colleges. He received the M.A. degree in 
Education Administration from the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky. He is married to the form- 
er Gertrude Cawood. Their son, Fred Lee, is 
seventeen years of age. 

The sectional representative lettered in 
football and basketball for four years in high 
school, and in football, basketball and tennis 
for the four years of his college career. He 
worked for many years as a football and 
basketball official, and held the "approved" 
and "certified" ratings in the latter sport 
for several years. He taught science and 
physical education and served as assistant 
coach for three years at Evarts High School. 
His educational experience also includes serv- 
ice as assistant high school principal, pupil 
personnel director, and supervisor. 

Mr. Thornton is an active member of the 
Harlan Methodist Church, where he served 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1960 



APRIL, 1960 



VOL. XXII— NO. 9 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1966-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones. (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin: Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsythe (1959-63), Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), 
Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (19B6-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



^rom the Co 



mtntssione'i s 



Off. 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1959-60 Basketball Participation List 

(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 

ball) 



REGIONAL TRACK MEETS 

The Board of Control has established twelve track 
regions for 1960. The scheduled date for the regional 
meets is May 13-14. Only first and second place win- 
ners in the regions will qualify for the State Meet. 
Sites of the meets are: Murray, Henderson, Bowling 
Green, Port Knox, Danville, Louisville (Bellarmine 
College), Louisville (Shawnee), Bellevue, Lexington, 
Barbourville, Elkhom City, and Ashland. 

The assignment of schools by regions is as follows: 

Murray Region — Ballard Memorial, Caldwell Coun- 
ty, Christian County, Fulton, Hopkinsville, Mayfield, 
Murray, Murray College, Paducah Tilghman, Trigg 
County. 

Henderson Region — Attucks, Daviess County, 
Douglass (Henderson), Henderson, Henderson County, 
Madisonville, Owensboro, Providence, Sturgis. 

Fort Knox Region — Campbellsville, Caverna, 
Clarkson, Elizabethtown, Elizabethtown Catholic, Fort 
Knox, Glendale, Greensburg, Howevalley, LaRue Coun- 
ty, Meade County, Munfordville, Rineyville, Vine Grove. 

Bowling Green Region — Austin- Tracy, Bowling 
Green, Bunche, College, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, 
Guthrie, High Street, Hiseville, Lincoln (Franklin), 
Metcalfe County, Park City, Russellville, Temple Hill, 
Todd County, Tompkinsville, Warren County. 

Bellarmine Region — Butler, Campbellsburg, Dur- 
rett. Eastern, Fairdale, Fern Creek, Kentucky Military 
Institute, Louisville Country Day, Pleasure Ridge Park, 
Seneca, Southern, Trinity, Valley, Waggener. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central (Louisville), 
DeSales, duPont Manual, Flaget, Male, Shawnee, St. 
Xavier. 

Lexington Region — Bourbon County, Bryan Sta- 
tion, DuBois, Dunbar (Lexington), Frankfort, Frank- 
lin County, Georgetown, Harrodsburg, Henry Clay, 
Jessamine County, Lafayette, Lexington Catholic, 
Madison Central, Madison-Model, Midway, Millersburg 
Military Institute, Montgomery County, Paris, Scott 
County, Sharpsburg, University High, Winchester. 



STATE TRACK MEET SCHEDULE 
Lexington, Kentucky May 20-21 
(Time is Eastern Standard Time) 
FRIDAY 

2:30 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (4 heats), 2 
from each heat qualify for Finals; Shot Put and Pole 
Vault, Finals. 

2:50 P.M.— 100 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

3:05 P.M.— 880 Yard Relay (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

3:35 p!m.— 440 Yard Dash (3 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualifv for Finals. 

4:00 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (4 heats), 2 
from each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:20 P.M.— 880 Yard Run (3 heats), 3 from each 
heat oualifv for Finals. 

4:45 p!m.— 220 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

5:05 P.M. — Mile Relay (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

SATURDAY 

1:00 P.M. — High Jump, Discus, and Bread Jump. 

2:00 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles 

2:15 P.M.— 100 Yard Dash 

2:30 P.M.— Mile Run 

2:45 P.M.— 880 Yard Relay 

3:00 P.M.— 440 Yard Dash 

3:15 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles 

3:30 P.M.— 880 Yard Run 

3:45 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash 

4:00 P.M.— Mile Relay 



Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone 
County, Campbell County, Dayton, Dixie Heights, 
Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, Ludlow, Newport, Newport 
Catholic, Simon-Kenton. 

Danville Region — Bardstown, Bate, Bloomfield, 
Burgin, Danville, Old Kentucky Home, Parksville, 
Perryville, Rosenwald (Lebanon), Russell County, St. 
Charles (Lebanon), St. Catherine (New Haven), St. 
Joseph (Bardstown), Springfield, Stanford, Western 
(Sinai). 

Barbourville Region — Barbourville, Bell County, 
Black Star, Clay County, Corbin, East Benham, Evarts, 
Hall, Harlan, Hazel Green (East Bernstadt), Lily, Lon- 
don, Loyall, Middlesboro, Nancy, Pineville, Red Bird, 
Ro.senwald (Barbourville), Rosenwald (Harlan), 
Somerset, Wallins, Williamsburg. 

Elkhom City Region — Belfry, Buckhorn, Dunham, 
Elkhorn City, Flat Gap, Fleming-Neon, Hazard, Jen- 
kins, Martin, M. C. Napier, Paintsville, Pikeville, Virgie, 
Wayland, Cumberland, Dilce Combs, Whitesburg. 

Ashland Region — Ashland, Catlettsburg, Fairview, 
Meade Memorial, Raceland, Russell, Wurtland. 

TENNIS TOURNAMENTS 

On May 9 six regional tennis tournaments will be 
held. The sites are Bowling Green, Fort Knox, Louis- 
ville, Jefferson County, Lexington, and Bellevue. The 
State Tennis Tournament will be held in Louisville 
on May 16-17. The assignment of schools by regions 
is as follows: 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, Franklin- 
Simpson, Glasgow, Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Russell- 
ville, Tompkinsville, Warren County. 

Louisville Region — J. M. Atherton, Central, De- 
Sales, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1960 



Page Three 



Jefferson County Region — Durrett, Eastern, Ken- 
tucky Militiary Institute, Louisville Country Day, 
Seneca, Southern, Trinity, Valley, Waggener. 

Lexington Region — Ashland, Berea Foundation, 
Danville, Franklin County, Hazel Green (East Bern- 
stadt), Henry Clay, Millersburg Military Institute, 
Paintsville, Pikeville, Somerset, University. 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Covington 
Catholic, Dayton, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, Ludlow. 

Ft. Knox Region — Caverna, Elizabethtown Cath- 
olic, Ft. Knox, Greennsburg, Henderson, Larue 
County, Memorial (Hardyville, Owensboro, St. Joseph. 
GOLF TOURNAMENTS 

Eight regional tournaments have been set up in 
golf. These tournaments will be held on May 18 at 
Princeton, Bowling Green, Louisville, Jefferson County, 
Danville, Harlan, Paintsville, and Covington. The 
State Golf Tournament will be held at Fort Knox on 
May 23-24. The assignment of schools by regions is 
as follows: 

Princeton Region — Caldwell County, Douglass 
(Henderson), Fulton, Greenville, Hopkinsville, Madison- 
ville, Mayfield, Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Pa- 
ducah Tilghman. 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, College 
High, Elizabethtown, Elizabethtown Catholic, Fort 
Knox, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, High Street, Tomp- 
kinsville, Russellville, Scottsville, Vine Grove. 

Louisville Region — DeSales, Flaget, J. M. Ather- 
ton, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 

Jefferson County Region — Butler, Durrett, East- 
ern, Fern Creek, Frankfort, Kentucky Military Insti- 
tute, Louisville Country Day, Seneca, Southern, Shelby- 
ville, Trinity, Waggener, Valley. 

Danville Region — Bardstown, Danville, Franklin 
County, Lafayette, Lebanon, Lexington Catholic, 
Springfield, St. Augustine, St. Joseph, University High. 

Harlan Region — Corbin, Cumberland, East Main 
(Lynch), Hall, Middlesboro. 

Paintsville Region — Ashland, Boyd County, Haz- 
ard, Martin, Paintsville, Pikeville. 

Covington Region — Beechwood, Covington Cath- 
olic, Dixie Heights, Highlands, Holmes, Holy Cross, 
Lloyd, Maysville, Newport, St. Henry. 

BASEBALL TOURNAMENTS 

The district baseball tournaments are scheduled to 
be held on May 10-12. The dates should be set by the 
district tournament managers, and should represent the 
thinking of the majority of principals or coaches in 
the district involved. The regional tournaments will 
be held on May 25-26, and the State Baseball Tourna- 
ment is scheduled to be played at the University of 
Kentucky, Lexington, on June 8-9. The assignment 
of schools to the various districts and regions is as 
follows: 

MURRAY REGION 

South Christian District — Attucks, Christian Coun- 
ty, Hopkinsville, Trigg County. 

Murray District — Benton, Douglass (Murray), 
Hazel, Miirray, Murray College, South Marshall. 

Paducah District — Ballard Memorial, Carlisle Coun- 
ty, Heath, Reidland, St. John (Paducah), St. Mary 
(Paducah), Tilghman. 

Mayfield District — Cuba, Fulton County, Hickman, 
Lowes, Mayfield, Wingo. 

Caldwell County District — Caldwell County, Critten- 
den County, Fredonia, Livingston Central, Lyon County. 
OWENSBORO REGION 

Henderson County District — Henderson, Hender- 
son County, Holy Name, Morganfield, Sebree, Sturgis, 
St. Vincent. 



Irvington District — Breckinridge County, Flaherty, 
Frederick-Fraize, Hawesville, Irvington, Lewisport, 
Meade County. 

Hartford District — Beaver Dam, Centertown, 
Fordsville, Hartford. 

Owensboro District — Daviess County, Owensboro, 
Owensboro Catholic, Western (Owensboro). 

Madisonville District — Bremen, Calhoun, Earling- 
ton, Livermore, Madisonville, Sacramento, South 
Hopkins. . I 

Greenville District — Central City, Drakesboro, 
Drakesboro Community, Graham, Greenville, Hughes- 
Kirk, Muhlenberg Central. 

GLASGOW REGION 

Bowling Green District — Bowling Green, Bristow, 
College High, Franklin-Simpson, High Street, Lincoln 
(Franklin), North Warren, Richardsville, Warren 
County. 

Russellville District — Adairville, Auburn, Russell- 
ville, Todd County, Todd County Training. 

Glasgow District — Austin-Tracy, Bunche, Gamaliel, 
Glasgow, Hiseville, Park City, Temple Hill, Tompkins- 
ville. 

Caverna District — Caverna, Cub Run, Larue 
County, Memorial, Metcalfe County, Munfordville. 

Leitchfield District — Butler County, Clarkson, Ed- 
monson County, Leitchfield. 

Campbellsville District — Adair County, Campbells- 
ville, Greensbm-g, Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. Charles, 
St. Francis, Taylor County. 

St. Joseph District — Bardstown, Bloomfield, Fred- 
ericktown, Lebanon Junction, Mt. Washington, St. 
Aloysius, St. Joseph, Springfield. 

Vine Grove District — Elizabethtown, Elizabethtown 
Catholic, Fort Knox, Glendale, Howevalley, Lynnvale, 
Rineyville, Sonora, Vine Grove. 

LOUISVILLE REGION 

St. Xavier District — Central, Flaget, Shavraiee, St. 
Xavier. 

Manual District — Atherton, DeSales, Male, Manual. 

Butler District — Butler, Durrett, Fairdale, Fern 
Creek, Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, Valley. 

Trinity District — Eastern, Kentucky Military In- 
stitute, Louisville Country Day, Seneca, Trinity, Wag- 
gener. 

NEWPORT REGION 

St. Henry District — Boone County, Lloyd Memor- 
ial, Simon-Kenton, St. Henry. 

Dixie Heights District — Beechwood, Covington 
Catholic, Dixie Heights, Holmes, Holy Cross, Ludlow. 

Silver Grove — Campbell County, Highlands, Silver 
Grove, St. Thomas. 

Grant County District — Falmouth, Grant County, 
Pendleton, Walton- Verona, Williamstown. 

Newport District — Bellevue, Dayton, Newport, 
Newport Catholic. 

Maysville District — Bracken County, Fleming 
County, May's Lick, Maysville, Orangeburg, ToUesboro, 
Vanceburg. 

LEXINGTON REGION 

Frankfort District — Anderson, Frankfort, Frank- 
lin County, Georgetown, Scott County, Versailles. 

Paris District — Bom'bon County, Carlisle, Cyn- 
thiana, Harrison County, Millersburg Military Insti- 
tute, Paris, North Middletown, Western. 

Harrodsburg District — Buckeye, Camp Dick Robin- 
son, Danville, Harrodsburg, Lancaster, Mercer County, 
Parksville, Junction City, PerryvOle. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1960 



Crab Orchard District — Crab Orchard, Hustonville, 
Liberty, Lincoln (Stanford), McKinney, Memorial, 
Middleburg, Mt. Vernon, Paint Lick 

Carrollton District — Campbellsburg, Carrollton, 
Eminence, Gallatin County, Owen County, Pleasure- 
ville, Trimble County. 

Lexington District — Bryan Station, Henry Clay, 
Jessamine County, Lafayette, Lexington Catholic, Uni- 
versity High. 

Shelbyville District — Bagdad, Lincoln Institute, 
Shelbyville, Simpsonville, Taylorsville, Waddy. 

Richmond District — Estill County, Hazel Green 
Academy, Irvine, Lee County, Madison Central, Madi- 
son Model, McKee. 

MIDDLEBORO REGION 

Somerset District — Burnside, Eubank, Ferguson, 
Hazel Green (East Bernstadt), Lily, London, Mc- 
Creary County, Nancy, Pine Knot, Pulaski County, 
Russell County, Somerset. 

Lynch District — Benham, Cumberland, East Main, 
Evarts, Hall, Harlan, Loyall. 

Middlesboro District — Bell County, Corbin, Lone 
Jack, Middlesboro, Red Bird Settlement, Williamsburg, 

Jenkins District — Carr Creek, Fleming-Neon, Jenk- 
ins, Whitesburg. 

M. C. Napier District — Buckhorn, Clay County, 
Dilce Combs, Hazard, Leatherwood, Leslie County, 
Magoffin Baptist Institute, Napier, Tyner. 

Elkhorn City District — Elkhorn City, Johns Creek, 
MuUins, Pikeville, Virgie. 

GRAYSON REGION 

Ashland District — Ashland, Blaine, Boyd County, 
Catlettsburg, Fairview, Louisa. 

McKell District— Greenup, McKell, Russell, South 
Portsmouth, Wurtland. 

Mt. Sterling District — Camargo, DuBois, Montgom- 
ery County, Mt. Sterling, Owingsville, Powell County, 
Sharpsburg, Winchester. 

Grayson District — Breckinridge Training, Hitchins, 
Olive Hill, Prichard, Rowan County. 

Paintsville District — Ezel, Inez, Meade Memorial, 
Morgan County, Oil Springs, Paintsville, VanLear. 

Wheelwright District — Auxier, Betsy Lane, Mar- 
tin, McDowell, Wheelwright. 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, on Friday morning, March 18, 1960. The meet- 
ing was called to order by President Russell William- 
son at 9 :00, with all Board members and Commissioner 
Theo. A. Sanford present. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by W. H. Crowdus, 
that the reading of the minutes of the January 23rd 
meeting be waived, since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton had been re-elected to Board membership, repre- 
senting Section 7; and that Oran C. Teater had been 
elected to Board membership, representing Section 8, 
each or our year periods beginning July 1, 1960. The 
Commissioner reported that the votes cast were as 
follows: Section 7— Cecil A. Thornton 44, Roy T. 



Reasor 5; Section 8— Oran C. Teater 27, Webb Young, 
16, W. F. Doane 15, John Bill Trivette 2. 

There was a discussion of new proposals to be 
presented by the Board of Control to the forthcoming 
Delegate Assembly. The Commissioner was author- 
ized to submit the follovi'ing proposals as Board pro- 
posals, on motion of W. B. Jones, seconded by Jack 
Dawson, the motion carrying unanimously: 

Proposal I — The Board of Control proposes that 
the following be added to By-Law 37: "except that 
this exemption shall apply only to full boarding stu- 
dents. A school violating this rule shall be suspended 
from the Association." 

Proposal II — The Board of Control proposes that 
"nineteenth" be substituted for 'twentieth" in By- 
Law 4 with the provision that this change, if adopted, 
not be put into effect until July 1, 1961. 

The Commissioner recommended that the Board 
consider the advisability of setting up a State Tennis 
Tournament for girls. He said that an invitational 
tournament for girls had been sponsored by a Louis- 
ville group for the past two seasons with the approval 
of the Board, and that it now appeared that enough 
interest had been created in the sport for an official 
State Tournament to be attempted by the Associa- 
tion. W. B. Jones moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, 
that the Commissioner be given a maximum budget 
of $1,000 for the current school year for the pm'pose 
of attempting to organize and manage a state tennis 
tournament for girls whose schools are members of 
the Kentucky High School Athletic Association. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner recommended that regulations 
in golf for 1960 be identical with those of 1959 with 
one exception, this being that each participant in a 
regional golf tournament be required to play 18 holes 
rather than 36 holes. W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded 
by Robert P. Forsythe, that the recommendation by 
the Commissioner be accepted and adopted. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton, that all bills of the Association beginning Janu- 
ary 23, 1960, and ending March 17, 1960, be approved. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



1960 ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
29: "Any coach or other person connected 
with competing schools who is to officiate 
a game in which his school participates, who 
does not notify the opposing school of his 
intent to officiate the particular game at 
least fifteen days before the game, shall be 
suspended from officiating the remainder 
of the season in the particular sport involved. 
PROPOSAL VI 
Prin. Herman 0. Hale, (Deming) proposes 
that the following be added to By-Law 37: 
"for boys from states other than Kentucky." 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1960 



Page Five 



1960 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, February 27, I960 



CLASS A 
Results 

St. Xavier 88 

Waggener 86 

Lafayette 55 

Atherton 31 

1. 400 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Diebold, St. Xavier 
(5:42.9); Dennis, Atlierton (6:03.3): Old- 
ham. Atherton (6:13.4): Hart, Bryan 
Station (6:24.8); Wilson, Bryan Station 
(7:01.8); Hollingsworth, Bryan Station 
(7:30.5). 

Heat No. 2 : Horton, St. Xavier 
(5:21.0); Fransen, Atherton (5:29.6); 
Wyatt, Waggener (6:37.5); Freeman, 
Lafayette (5:55.7); Durham, Lafayette 
(6:18.1). 

Heat No. 3: Farmer, Waggener 
(4:60.4); Freeman, Lafayette (4:53.2); 
Kute, St. Xavier (4:63.2); Hammond, 
Lafayette (4 :58.2) ; Georgi, Waggener 
(6:09.3). 

Finals 

1. Farmer, Waggener 4:50.4 

2. Freeman, Lafayette 4:53.2 

3. Kute, St. Xavier 4:53.2 

4. Hammond, Lafayette 4 :58.2 

5. Georgi, Waggener 6:09.3 

6. Horton, St. Xavier 5:21.0 

2. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Grunwald, Waggener 
(:26.3); Knopf, St. Xavier (:26.1); 
Worrell, Lafayette (:26.4); Ogle, Wag- 
gener (:26.5). 

Heat No. 2: Roof, Atherton (:26.1); 
Cooke, Lafayette ( :26.S) : Dabney, Bryan 
Station ( :27.8) ; Clark, Waggener (:28.0). 

Heat No. 3 : Sprauer, St. Xavier 
( :25.6) ; Patton, Lafayette ( :25.8) ; Hub- 
buch, St. Xavier ( :26.9) ; Johnson. Ather- 
ton (:27.9); Kremmer, Eastern (:3D.O). 

Heat No. 4 : Higgs, Waggener ( :24.4) ; 
Roles, Eastern ( :25.9) : Harpring, St. 
Xavier ( :27.0) ; Schi-im, Lafayette (:29.0); 
Kretschman, Atherton (:29.3). 



Finals 

Roof, Atherton 

Higgs, Waggener 

Grunwald, Waggener 

Roles, Eastern 

Sprauer, St. Xavier . 
Patton, Lafayette 



3. 100 Yard Butterfly- 
Heat No. 1: Bush, Atherton (1:12.8); 

Wightman, Lafayette (1 :20.6) ; Neuman, 

Lafayette (1 :32.9) ; Farley, Lafayette, 

Disqualified. 

Heat No. 2: Vetter, St. Xavier 

(1:11.7); Ackerman, St. Xavier (1:11.8); 

Speevack, Atherton (1:22.1). 

Heat No. 3 : Abbott, Waggener 

(1:02.6); Medez, Atherton (1:19.3); 

Miniea, Waggener (1 :24.8) ; Liebschutz, 

Atherton (1 :30.6) ; Bowen, St. Xavier 

(1:36.3). 

Finals 

1. Abbott, Waggener 1 ;03.1 

2. Vetter, St. Xavier 1:09.3 

3. Ackerman, St. Xavier 1 :12.9 

4. Bush, Atherton 1 :30.0 

5. Wightman, Lafayette 1:18.2 

6. Mendez, Atherton 1 :20.1 



4. 200 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Lococo, St. Xavier 
(2:12.9); Peskoe, Waggener (2:15.7); 
Frankenberger, Atherton (2:34.1): Jump, 
Bryan Station (2:42.3); Durham, La- 
fayette (2:50.1); Sparks, Bryan Station 
(2:53.1). 

Heat No. 2 : Hammond, Lafayette 
(2:14.0); Georgi, Waggener (2:18.7); 
Horton, St. Xavier (2:26.2); Petit, Lex- 
ington Catholic (2:32.7); Wyatt, Waggen- 
er (2:36.3); Lingenfelter, Bryan Station 
(2:52.5). 

Heat No. 3 : F. Freeman, Lafayette 
(2:16.2); Kute, St. Xavier (2:19.5); Ban-, 
Atherton (2:25.6); Diebold, St. Xavier 
(2:40.0); D. Freeman, Lafayette (2:47.6). 

Finals 

Lococo, St. Xavier 2:08.8 

Peskoe, Waggener 2:10.0 

F. Freeman, Lafayette 2:12.9 

Hammond, Lafayette 2 :16.6 

Kute, St. Xavier 2:17.4 

Georgi, Waggener 2 :21.4 

5. 100 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1: Tandy, St. Xavier 
(1:06.4); Sympson, Lafayette (1:09.6); 
Gorman, Bryan Station (1:11.9); Cum- 
mins, Atherton (1:16.7). 

Heat No. 2 : Abbott, Waggener 
(1 :05.3) ; Miniea, Waggener (1 :10.0) ; 
Rausch, St. Xavier (1 :14.8) ; Vry, Lafay- 
ette (1:16.5;: Murray, Bryan Station 
(1:28.6). 

Heat No. 3 : Langston, Lafayette 
(1:07.6); Metcalf, Atherton (1:12.9); 
Ashford, Lafayette (1:16.2); Terrill, 
Bryan Station (1:29.9). 

Finals 

Abbott, Waggener 1 :04.2 

Tandy, St. Xavier 1:04.7 

Langston, Lafayette 1 :06.1 

Sympson, Lafayette 1:09.2 

Miniea, Waggener 1:10.3 

Gorman, Bryan Station 1:11.1 



6. 100 Yard Breaststrokc — 

Heat No. 1 : Combs, Lafayette 
(1:18.3); Miniea, Waggener (1:19.9): 
Taylor, Waggener (1:26.0); Miller, Wag- 
gener, Disqualified. 

Heat No. 2 : Parsons, St. Xavier 
(1:17.0): Smith, Atherton (1:18.6); 
Liebschutz, Atherton (1:27.6); Stone, 
Bryan Station (1:31.0). 

Heat No. 3 : Henderson, Waggener 
(1:13.2); Ambrose, St. Xavier (1:18.4); 
Neubauer, Lafayette (1:21.9); Kretsch- 
man, Atherton (1:26.2). 

Heat No. 4: Reilly, St. Xavier 
(1:12.6); Diebold, St. Xavier (1:19.8); 
Kiviniemi, Lafayette (1 :20.0) ; Sammons, 
Lafayette (1:30.7). 

Finals 

Reilly, St. Xavier 1:12.7 

Henderson, Waggener 1 :12.8 

Ambrose, St. Xavier 1 :17.2 

Parsons, St. Xavier 1:18.1 

Combs, Lafayette 1 :18.5 

Smith, Atherton 1 :18.e 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle- 
Heat No. 1 : Dabney, Bryan Station 

(1:01.5); Royalty, Lafayette (1:04.4); 
Johnson, Atherton (1 :06.7) ; Hite, La- 
fayette (1:12.7). 



Heat No. 2 : Roles, Eastern ( :56.8) ; 
Patton, Lafayette (:59.1); French, St. 
Xavier (1 :06.2) ; Metcalf, Atherton 
(1:11.7). 

Heat No. 3 : Peskoe, Waggener 
( :58.7) ; Coy, St. Xavier ( :59.3) : Petit, 
Le.xington Catholic (1 :02.1) ; Dennis, 
Atherton (1:07.7). 

Heat No. 4 : Lococo, St. Xavier 
(:57.7); Walker, Henry Clay (1:01.8); 
Jump, Bryan Station (1:08.9): Sparks, 
Bryan Station {1:10.3); Oldham, Ather- 
ton (1:12.6). 

Finals 

Roles, Eastern :57.4 

Lococo, St. Xavier :58.2 

Patton, Lafayette 1 :00.4 

Coy, St. Xavier 1:00.6 

Peskoe, Waggener 1 :01.4 

Dabney, Bryan Station 1 :01.5 

Fancy Diving — 

Profumo, St. Xavier 293.20 

Irion, Waggener 290.00 

Karsner, Lafayette 269.40 

Snow, Atherton 234.45 

Krucas, Lafayette 229.00 

Downing, Bryan Station 210.45 

Stone, Waggener 196.45 

9. 200 Yard Individual Medley — 

Heat No. 1 : Langston, Lafayette 
(2:38.9); Parsons, St. Xavier (2:41.4); 
Walker, Henry Clay (2:43.1); Vry, La- 
fayette (2:67.4); Bowen, St. Xavier 
(2:57.8). 

Heat No. 2: D. Abbott, Waggener 
(2:27.3); Ackerman, St. Xavier (2:48.1); 
Neubauer, Lafayette (3:16.1); Lingen- 
felter, Bryan Station (3:22.1); Gorman, 
Bryan Station, Disqualified. 

Heat No. 3: J. Abbott, Waggener 
(2:29.4); Frankenberger, Atherton 
(2:67.5); Speevack, Atherton (3:01.0); D. 
Hart, Bryan Station (3:10.3); Neuman, 
Lafayette (3:22.4). 

Finals 

1. J. Abbott, Waggener 2:25.1 

2. D. Abbott, Waggener 2:25.9 

3. Langston, Lafayette 2 :37.5 

4. Parsons, St. Xavier 2:40.1 

5. Ackei-man, St. Xavier 2:43.1 

6. Walker, Henry Clay 2:46.9 



10. 200 Yard Medley Relay— 

1. Waggener (Miniea, Henderson, Farmer, 
Higgs) 1 :66.2 

2. St. Xavier (Tandy, Reilly, Vetter, 
Harpring) 1 :56.3 

3. Lafayette (Sympson, Combs, Wight- 
man, Worrell) 2:03.1 

4. Atherton (Cummins, Smith, Mendez, 
Snow) 2 :07.0 

5. Bryan Station (Terrill, Stone, Cinna- 
mon, Saunders) 2:29.6 



11. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay- 

1. St. Xavier (Knopf, Sprauer, Hubbach, 
Coy) 1 :43.6 

2. Atherton (Fransen, Barr, Bush, 
Roof) 1 :44.9 

3. Waggener (Irion, Clarke, Ogle, 
Grunwald) 1 :46.1 

4. Lafayette (Cooke, Royalty, Emmert, 
Schrim) 1 :48.1 

5. Bryan Station (C. Hart, Wilson, Gier- 
lach, D. Hart) 2:12.8 



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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1960 



The Flying Dutchman 

Jim Morris and his Flaget Braves draw 
the compliments of the Flying Dutchman. 
Great acclaim has come to this talented team 
for winning the 1960 basketball champion- 
ship. Praise from the Flying Dutchman 
comes to Jim's team because they knew how 
to win. The gentlemanly conduct of Flaget, 
the champion, and Monticello, the runner-up 
is a noteworthy feature of this year's tourna- 
ment. The other fourteen competing teams 
matched this sportsmanship which has 
caused Kentucky to be called, "The sports- 
manship capitol of the nation." 

It was timely that Denny Meredith, basket- 
ball official, asked that an Abou Ben Adhem 
certificate be sent to Flaget exactly a month 
before the boys distinguished themselves by 
not only winning a championship, but by 
setting examples of clean play for other 
young men to pattern from. During March, 
Southern High of Jefferson County, Shawnee 
High School of Louisville, and Breathitt 
County High School also received these good 
citizenship awards because of outstanding 
courtesies extended to officials and visitors. 
If you want to read a good poem, look up 
"Abou Ben Adhem" to get the philosophy 
behind the awards. 

Still on the subject of the state tourna- 
ment, salutes go to all of those workers along 
press row, and special recognition belongs 
to Charlton Hummel, who has done an amaz- 
ing job with the state tournament program 
year after year. For his unselfish work Charl- 
ton wins the Corn Cob Pipe Honor Award for 
the month of March., The award could not 
go to a nicer guy. 

It was inevitable that the Louisville sports 
writers and broadcasterrs would pay high 
tribute to the five basketball officials work- 
ing this tournament. They praised them in 
their comments and articles, and the Dutch- 
man echoes their compliments, saying that 
Warren Cooper, Sen. George Conley, 
"Toodles" Wells, Charlie Irwin and Doc Fer- 
rell did the best job of officiating that has 
been seen in the past ten years of Kentucky 
high school basketball tournaments. You 
"Whistle Tooters" not only did yourselves 
proud, but you gave Kentucky a sample of 
the type of officiating our teams are getting. 

Lexington Dunbar High School gets an 
"orchid" from the Flying Dutchman for good 
neighborly practices. It was the Dunbar 
team, coach and principal who were respons- 
ible for the Abou Ben Adhem citation going 




The Flying Dutchman 

to Breathitt County. They pointed out the 
excellent treatment Breathitt County afford- 
ed Dunbar while it was in that county for a 
ball game. Dunbar is a credit to the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association and is now 
in line for an award of its own. 

The Dutchman dropped in on Fairdale 
High School's first sports banquet in its short 
history. Principal Harry Hardin, Coaches 
Able and Simpson, and Athletic Director 
Streible did a magnificent job of honoring 
the athletic teams. All of the tickets were 
sold, and people were turned away because 
the stores there had no more meat. Harry 
had ordered 175 steaks, and there were no 
more steaks in town. There's one for the 
record ! 



Hospitality Committee, led 
did a workmanlike job en- 
s at the 1960 state basket- 
There was something for 
while the games were not 
a certainty that the young 
Louisville had themselves a 



The Louisville 
by Jack Dawson, 
tertaining visitor 
ball tournament, 
everybody to do 
in session. It is 
people coming to 
wholesome "ball." 

This next item is inserted to cause all of 
Kentucky's high school coaches to "drool." 
Elizabethtown Catholic High School fans did 
something for Coach Hardin McLane that 
would be well for all of Kentucky's commun- 
ities to copy. At the close of the basketball 
season. Coach McLane was presented a brand 
new Pontiac Catalina. 

And now for the big award of 1960! The 
Flying Dutchman announces the Game Guy 
of 1960. The boy who has overcome the great- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1960 



Page Nine 



est physical handicap to engage in sports 
and the one who will receive the honor trophy 
at the annual K.H.S.A.A. dinner during K.E. 
A. is Paul Kingrey of Glasgow. This young 
man has overcome epilepsy to become one 
of Glasgow's greats. He is one of Glasgow's 
few 4-letter men. Paul has two letters in 
basketball, baseball and track, and has served 
two years as manager of the football team. 
Not only is he a regular in basketball, but he 
covers the keystone sack in baseball and runs 
the 220 and 440 yard dashes in track. 

This eighteen year old lad has the respect 
of the people of Glasgow. This announce- 
ment that he has won the Game Award of 
1960 will te a landmark in the progress of 
Glasgow's athletic program as the town adds 
the name of another illustrious fighter along- 
side of the names of the famed athletes who 
have come before him. There will be dancing 
in the streets when Glasgow learns Paul is 
the winner. Such examples set by physically 
handicapped young men stimulate other 
youngsters with similar handicaps to do the 
same, creating happiness where gloom would 
have prevailed. Paul Kingrey will receive 
his award at the K.H.S.A.A. banquet from 
Bob Kirchdorfer, the winner of the first 
Game Award given in the year of 1949. 

The Dutchman has these famous last 
words for night drivers : 

"Well, if he won't dim his, I won't dim 



BOARD MEMBERS ELECTED 

(Continued from Page One) 
for five years as chairman of the Board of 
Stewards. For a long period of time he has 
taught a Sunday School class. He has for 
many years participated in Boy Scout work, 
and has served for over fourteen years on the 
Harlan County 4-H Club Council. He is a 
member of the Harlan County Association of 
Social Agencies. His professional affiliations 
include membership in the National Educa- 
tion Association, Kentucky Education As- 
sociation, Upper Cumberland Education As- 
sociation, Harlan County Education Associa- 
tion, American Association of School Admin- 
istrators, and the Association for Childhood 
Education International. Mr. Thornton is 
also a member of Kappa Delta Pi, national 
educational honor society. 

Oran C. Teater has a varied background in 
Eastern Kentucky athletics. Largely through 
his efforts, the present four-sport, ten-team 
Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference was 
formed in 1952. In the late forties, when 
Teater was president of the old Big Sandy 



Conference for three terms, he felt that 
many of the schools in Eastern Kentucky 
strongly overemphasized one sport. He was 
instrumental in spearheading a successful 
drive for a new four-sport league that re- 
quired participation in football, baseball, 
basketball and track. Teater headed the 
league in its early days. 

After graduation from Paintsville High 
School in 1940 as an all-conference footballer, 
Teater resumed his playing career at Centre 
College during the 1940-44 period. In his 
senior year at Centre, he coached the line 
at the local high school (Danville), which 
won the Central Kentucky Conference foot- 
ball title. He was Athletic Director for Cen- 
tre that year also. 

In the years that followed his college 
graduation, Teater returned to Paintsville to 
coach the Tigers to three Big Sandy Confer- 
ence titles in five years. His over-all football 
record was 34 wins, 11 losses and 3 ties. In 
basketball his teams won 64, lost 13. His 
baseball team won three straight district 
titles. 

In 1950 Mr. Teater was elevated to the 
principalship of the Paintsville High School, 
a position he held until he assumed the super- 
intendency of Paintsville City Schools last 
year. 

Aside from his school duties, the new 
Board of Control member is active in local 
affairs and state organizations while he con- 
tinues his work toward a Doctor's Degree in 
Education at the University of Kentucky. 
He received his M.A. at Morehead. He is a 
member of the Masons, Christian Church, 
Shrine, and the Paintsville Kiwanis Club 
(past president) ; and has served two terms 
on the Centre College Board of Overseers. 
He is a member of six other school frater- 
nities, honorary and social. His wife is the 
former Mary Evelyn VanHor.se of Paintsville 
and they have one daughter, Dianna Louise. 



TRACK NOTES 

Inquiries have been received in the K.H.- 
S.A.A. office concerning Track Rule 4, Sec- 
tion 1, Note 2, which says : "A contestant 
who participates in the 440, 880 or Mile Run 
should not be allowed to participate in any 
other track event in which re runs 440 or 
moi'e yards." Although K.H.S.A.A. Track 
Rule VI provides that National Federation 
Track and Field Rules shall govern the reg- 
ional and state track meets, K.H.S.A.A. 
Track Rule IX says : "In any meet a contest- 
ant may compete in not more than four 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Page Ten THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 

1960 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Average Score: For Winner, 68.1 ; For Losers, 59.1 ; Total for both 127.2 per 

Average No. Personal Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) : 29.3 per 

Average No. Times per game a player committed 5 Personals: 1.18 per 

Total No. Free Throw Attempts (per and T. for all games) 655. Successful 62% 

Total No. of Overtimes: 1 

Total No. Ending: 1st Overtime 1 

DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Personal fouls made by players while on Offense: 2.87 per 

Average No. (b) Fouls involving dribbler and guard : 5.75 per 

Average No. (c) Times dribbler committed foul: 1.43 per 

Average No. (d) Times 2 throws were given unsuccessful thrower: 5.93 per 

Average No. (e) Times a foul resulted in a bonus penalty: 9.75 per 

% of times 1st throw in (e) was successful: 57.1% 

% of 2nd throws which were successful: 60.8% 

Average No. (f) Official warnings about actionless game: per 

Average No. (g) Technical fouls for actionless game: per 

Average No. (h) Times per game there was basket interf. or goal tend: 

At player's own basket : per 

At opponent's basket: .06 per 

Average Over-all time from first toss to final gun: 1 hour and 12 minutes 

DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 
Average No. (a) Jump ball situations (include center jumps) : 8.7 per 

(1) Times jumps followed held ball: .31 per 

(2) Times held ball resulted from 5 sec. close guard per 

Average No. (b) Times ball was returned to back court legally after 

jump at center 1.25 per 

Average No. (c) Times returning ball to back court resulted in violation- _ per 

Average No. (d) Times Off. handled ball for back court throw-in: 5.3 per 

Average No. (e) Violations of 3-second lane rule: .56 per 

Average No. (f) Violations of free throw rule 9-1: .25 per 

Average No. (g) Times ball remained alive after unsuc. free throw: 8 per 

(h) % Times in (g) the free throw rebound was recovered by Defense :__ 62.5% 



1960 



game 
game 
game 



game 
game 
game 
game 
game 



game 
game 



game 
game 



game 
game 
game 

game 
game 
game 
game 
game 
game 



TABULATION OF VOTES ON HIGHEST RATED OFFICIALS - 1960 STATE TOURNAMENT 

Listed below are the tabulations of votes on the thirteen officials who received the high- 
est ratings by coaches of the sixteen teams which participated in the recent State High 
School Basketball Tournament. Each coach voted on six Certified officials in the order of 
his preference, the official whose name was listed first by the coach receiving six points, 
the second official five points, etc. This is the method which , has been used for many 
years by the Board of Control and the Commissioner in selecting State Tournament of- 
ficials. The schools given below are not listed in order by regions nor are they listed in 
the order of the tournament bracket. 



Official 



ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP TOTAL 



George Conley 


4 




3 




6 


1 






4 


3 






4 




6 


3 


34 


Charlie Irwin 


2 


6 


6 




1 






3 




6 






1 


4 


1 




30 


Warren Cooper 








5 


2 


4 




1 






4 




6 




5 


1 


28 


Milford Wells 








6 




3 


1 








2 




5 


6 




4 


27 


"Doc" Ferrell 




5 






5 








5 




1 








4 


6 


26 


Ralph Mussman 












6 


6 








3 




3 




2 




20 


Bill D. Harrell 


1 






2 


3 








6 










3 


3 




18 


Roy Winchester 




1 


4 










4 








2 




5 






16 


Dave Longenecker 




4 










5 




1 






1 


2 








13 


Bill Craft 












2 






3 




6 












11 


James J. Huter 














4 










6 




1 






11 


Shelby Winfrey 


3 


2 




4 


























9 


Ben Edelen 










4 






















5 


9 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1960 



Page Eleven 



Hopkinsville Attucks — Fourth Place Winner 
1960 State Basketball Tournament 




{.Lett to Kignt) t'ront Row: Philip Joiner, Howard Everett, RoUie Carter. George Dooley, 
William Torian, Walter Gee. Back Row: Costellus Majors, Billy Sharber, William Reeves, John 
Wilford, Albert Shaw, Robert Reese. 



OWENSBORO CHEERLEADERS 

Cheerleaders representing the Owensboro 
High School won first place in the sixth an- 
nual competition for the Cheerleaders' Cup, 
awarded by the Kentucky Association of Pep 
Organization Sponsors at the 1960 State 
Basketball Tournament. Runner-up honors 
went to the girls of the Ashland High School, 
with honorable mention going to the Harrods- 
burg High School representatives. Presenta- 
tion of the cup was made by President Rus- 
sell Williamson during the award ceremony 
following the final game of the tournament. 
The selection was based on the following 
points: appearance, ability, choice of yells, 
conduct, pep and enthusiasm, and sports- 
manship. 

Correction 

Through an error the 1959 sportsmanship 
ratings in football for the Burgin High School 
did not appear with the other ratings in the 
March issue of the ATHLETE. The ratings 
are as follows: coach, 6-2-0^0; other school 
officials, 5-3-0-0; crowd, 3-5-0-0; team, 2-3- 
2-1. 

ATHLETICS AND ANTIBIOTICS 

In the brief time since the antibiotics 
(antibacterial agents of biologic origin) be- 



came available, they have caused a revolu- 
tion in the treatment of infectious disease. 
Beginning with penicillin, a host of power- 
ful antibiotics have been identified and new 
ones continue to be developed in our labora- 
tories. They are used to cure some diseases, 
to prevent others and to reduce the severity 
and effects of still others. But, in spite of 
their benefits, they have certain limitations 
and disadvantages: 
like colds, influenza or hepatitis. 

1. They do not help to cure virus diseases 
like colds, influenza or hepatitis. 

2. They can cause side effects such as 
rash, dizziness and severe allergies. 

3. Their continuing widespread use tends 
to develop new resistant strains of bacteria. 

4. They may encourage harmful effects 
from otherwise inactive fungi in the intes- 
tines. 

5. No one antibiotic is successful against 
all disease organisms. 

6. Casual use may develop individual sen- 
sitivity to a drug making it unuseable for 
that person when needed for serious or life- 
saving purposes. 

For all of these reasons, antibiotic drugs, 
by Federal regulation, can be prescribed only 
by a physician. But there are ways of cir- 
cumventing such regulations and resorting 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1960 



to dangerous self-medication. Athletes and 
and their associates, in common with many 
other people, have sometimes indulged in 
this practice. 

Another player or even an ill-advised adult 
may offer the unused portion of a prescrip- 
tion they were given for a condition "just 
like yours." The athlete himself may have a 
leftover supply from a pervious sickness 
which he believes to be the same as today's 
illness or perhaps another member of the 
family may have had a prescription for a 
condition which seemed to resemble the pres- 
ent trouble. 

Sometimes such self-diagnosis and self- 
treatment has unfortunate results in side 
effects or the development of sensitivity, 
but the greatest danger lies in the delay of 
proper medical care until treatment is dif- 
ficult. As a result, an athlete may miss sev- 
eral weeks of play when, with prompt and 
proper care, he could have returned to com- 
petition in a few days. Fortunately, the ma- 
jority of coaches and trainers are now aware 
of those hazards and will not permit such 
practices in their athletes or on the part 
of their staff. — A.M.A. and the National 
Federation. 



PRESENTING 

W. GORDON EISMOX, recently elected 
Executive Secretary of the West Virginia 
Secondary School Activities Commission to 
succeed the late W. R. Fugitt who passed 
away a short time ago. 

Gordon is particularly qualified, having 
both the education and experience to con- 
tinue to provide the West Virginia Com- 
mission with positive progressive leadership. 
He is a graduate of Spencer High School, 
received his Bachelor's Degree at Glenville 
State and his Master's Degree at West Vir- 
ginia University. He was an outstanding ath- 
lete, participating in both football and base- 
ball, serving as football captain for one sea- 
son. After a distinguished college career, he 
taught and coached in high school for 12 
years before entering the field of adminis- 
tration as Principal at Wirt County High 
School. Later Mr. Eismon served as County 
Superintendent of Schools. In 1948 he ac- 
cepted the principalship of Charles Town 
High School and continued to serve in that 
capacity until elected Secretary of the West 
Virginia Commission. 

Gordon's experience as Coach, Principal, 
Football Rules Committee Member and as a 
member of the Board of Appeals provides 
an excellent background for his present po- 



sition. Until this past season he officiated 
football and he continues to serve as Presi- 
dent of the Winchester Valley Officials' As- 
sociation. 

Mr. Eismon is a member of the Official 
Board of the Charles Town Methodist 
Church, Past District Governor of Lions 
International and an active worker in the 
program of State and National Educational 
Association. Until recently, he has been ac- 
tive in the Boy Scout program. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eismon have a son, Danny, 
who is presently a Junior in high school and 
during the past season was one of the out- 
standing interscholastic football players in 
the state. 



TOURNAMENT FOR GIRLS 

At the Board of Control meeting held 
during State Basketball Tournament time, 
the Commissioner recommended to the Board 
that a State Tennis Tournament for Girls 
be attempted by i /e Association, since it now 
appears that enoutjh interest has been creat- 
ed in the sport in certain areas of the state 
to justify such a tournament. The Board 
accepted the recommendation, and directed 
the Commissioner to explore the possibilities 
of the suggested tournament and to conduct 
it as such action seems advisable. If a state 
tournament is held, the dates will probably 
be May 13-14. The tentative site is Shawnee 
Park, Louisville. Principals of K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools who might wish to enter 
individual competitors or teams in the pro- 
posed tournament should notify the K.H.S. 
A. A. office at once. If many schools are in- 
volved ,it will probably be necessary for reg- 
ional tournaments to be held. 



TRACK NOTES 

(Continued from Page Nine) 
events, not more than three of which shall 
be running events." The Commissioner has 
ruled that the new track regulation mention- 
ed will not apply in Kentucky this year. 

Those participating in the 1960 State 
Track Meet at the University of Kentucky 
this year will see one of the finest areas for 
track and field in America. The surface of 
the new track is an asphalt-rubber combina- 
tion which is all-weather. Spikes longer than 
3 16 of an inch may not be used, with 1/8 
inch spike being preferred. Cross-country, 
tennis, and basketball shoes will be in order. 
The set-up provides for the field events to 
take place in the infield. The broad jump and 
pole vault runways will have the asphalt- 
rubber surface, while the shot and discus 
circles will be concrete. 



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UTCLIFFE Cp 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKj'Y 




High School Athlete 



HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 

KENTUCKY CLASS "B" CHAMPION^1960 



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(Left to Right) Front Row: Jennifer Keitz, Jim Stivers, Tom Bootes, Riclvy Hill, Dave Trim- 
nell, Jerry Williams, Jim Fulmer and Donna Glass. Second Row: Jerry Conners, Jim Black, Allen 
Fulmer, Fred Knapp, Roger Boone, Charlie Dorsey, Jerry McKenzie and Kim Reik. 



Oificial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MAY - ISBD 




Baseball Rulings... 

Editor's Note : These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. They are interpretations of some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

1. Play: Rl is on 2nd. F6 attempts to reach ball 
batted by B2 but ball goes past him and then strikes 
Umpire. F6 gets ball and throws to 1st before B2 
arrives there. 

Ruling: Ball remains alive. B2 is out and Rl may 
advance at his own risk. (5-1-1-g) 

2. Play: With Rl on: (a) 1st; or (b) 2nd; balk is 
followed by a pitch which hits B2. 

Ruling: In (a) penalty for balk is ignored and B2 
is awarded 1st and Rl goes to 2nd. In (b) balk is 
penalized and Rl is awarded 3rd and B2 remains 
at bat. (6-2-4 penalty) 

3. Play: With one out and Rl, R2 and R3 on 3rd, 
2nd and 1st bases, respectively, B5 hits a fly which 
is caught. Catch is followed by erratic throw during 
which ball remains alive and Rl and R2 advance to 
home base. R3 is out on appeal for failure to tag 
up at 1st. 

Ruling: Runs by Rl and R2 count. (2-ll-6;9-l-l) 

4. Play: With reentry plan in use, it is announced 
that substitute Johnson will pinch hit for starting 
center fielder Larson who is in fourth place in the 
batting order. When may Larson reenter? 

Ruling: Immediately, and he must return to fourth 
place in the batting order. (3-1-3 optional reentry) 

5. Play: Using reem-y plan, SlO pinch hits for B5 
in the fourth inning. In the fifth inning SlO is re- 
placed by B5. In the seventh inning SlO intends to 
enter again to pinch hit for Bl. 

Ruling: Illegal. Because SlO was not one of the 
starting nine players and has been in the game (dur- 
ing the fourth inning) he cannot return as a player. 
(3-1-3 optional reentry). 

6. Play: F6 overthrows 1st base. Does ball become 
dead? 

Ruling: Not unless ball goes into the stand or 
dugout or is touched by a spectator or goes under or 
through a fence or becomes stuck in a fence. (5-1-1-h) 

7. Play: 3rd strike on Bl is dropped. Catcher gets 
ball and overthrows 1st. In (a) the ball goes into the 
stands but in (b) the ball does not go into the 
stand, touch a spectator, go under the fence or stick 
in the fence. 

Ruling: Ball remains alive in (b) but in (a) it be- 
comes dead and Bl is awarded 2nd base. (5-1-1-h) 

8. Play: Bl avoids pitch which hits his bat. 
Ruling: It is a fair hit or a foul hit or a foul 

tip. (7-2-3) 

9. Play: With Rl on 3rd, foul fly by B2 in front of 
stand is deflected by a spectator so that F3 cannot 
make the catch. 

Ruling: B2 is out. Ball is dead. Rl may not re- 
touch and advance. (7-4-a) 

10 Play: With R2 on 2nd and Rl on 1st, R2 in- 
terferes with ball hit by B3 toward F6. It is apparent 
that ball hit by B3 could result in double play. 

Ruling: Interference causes ball to become dead. 
R2 and B3 are declared out. Rl remains on 1st. 
(8-4-2-b; 8-4-1-g) 

11. Play: Catcher has one or both feet outside 
catcher's box at time of pitch for intentional walk 
or a pitchout in (a) with no runner on base or (b) 
with a runner or runners. 

Ruling: In (a) it is an illegal pitch if batter does 
not reach 1st base safely through hit or otherwise. 




The pitch is called a ball even if it goes through 
the strike zone. In (b), unless the batter and each 
runner advance one base or more, it is a balk which 
causes ball to become dead as soon as the balk 
occurs. Hence, it is neither ball nor strike. As penalty, 
each runner (but not the batter) is awarded one 
base. (6-1-1 and penalty) 

12. Play: With Rl on 3rd and R2 on 2nd, B3 is 
thrown out at 1st by F6. During throw F5 temporarily 
obstructs Rl who then scores. R2 starts to advance 
to 3rd but returns to 2nd when he sees Rl is ob- 
structed. 

Ruling: B3 is out. Run by Rl counts. R2 is awarded 
3rd base. (8-3-1-c and Note) 

13. Play: With Rl on 2nd and R2 on 1st, B3 is 
thrown out at 1st by F6. R2 is temporarily obstructed 
by F4. Rl is thrown out at home plate and R2 
advances to 3rd. 

Ruling: B3 and Rl are out. R2 may remain on 3rd. 
Since Rl safely reached 3rd and R2 safely reached 
2nd (which, in each case, was the base they would 
have I'eached without obstruction) the ball remains 
alive. Rl and R2 advanced beyond 3rd and 2nd at 
their own risk. (8-3-1-c and Note) 

14. Play: With Rl on 2nd and R2 on 1st, B3 hits 
past F8 to the centerfield fence. F6 obstructs Rl. R2 
passes Rl between 2nd and 3rd bases. Rl then reaches 
3rd base. B3 reaches 2nd. 

Ruling: R2 is out as soon as he passes Rl. Be- 
cause Rl would have undoubtedly scored had there 
been no obstruction the Umpire will declare the ball 
dead to award home base to him. B3 will remain on 
2nd. (8-4-2-h; 8-3-1-c Note; 9-1-1 Note) 

15. Play: Rl is on 1st when B2 receives a 4th ball. 
Catcher overthrows 1st base and ball stays innside 
the fence. Rl goes to 3rd and B2 to 2nd. 

Ruling: Ball remains alive. Legal advance by both 
Rl and B2. (8-1-lc; 9-5-5) 

16. Play: Batted ball strikes home plate or in 
catcher's box and bounces to fair ground. 

Ruling: Fair ball unless touched by batter, catcher 
or Umpire over foul ground. (2-7-1) 

17. Play: SlO wishes to replace B4. 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXII— NO. 10 



MAY, 1960 



$1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The forty-third annual meeting of the 
Kentucky Hig-h School Athletic Association 
was held at the Brown Hotel, Louisville, on 
Thursday afternoon, April 21, 1960. 

President Russell Williamson called the 
meeting to order at 2:30, and asked the Com- 
missioner to call the roll of delegates. Fifty- 
four regularly elected delegates or alter- 
nates answered the roll call. The following 
delegates were seated in the absence of the 
delegates or alternates from their respective 
districts : George Wooten, D. 6 ; Harold Hunt- 
er, D. 18 ; Clinton B. Hammons, D. 50 ; W. L. 
Miracle, D. 51; Roy G. Eversole, D. 54; John 
Campbell, D. 58; Jack Fultz, D. 63; Cliff 
Lowdenback, D. 64. 

Russell Below moved, seconded by Brad- 
ford D. Mutchler, that the minutes of the 
1959 annual meeting of the Association, 
which had been sent previously to all mem- 
ber schools, be approved without being read. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a report 
on the activities of the Association during 
the 1959-60 schooll year (The report of the 
Commissioner appears elsewhere in this issue 
of the magazine). 

President Williamson introduced to the 
Delegate Assembly Cecil A. Thornton and 
Oran C. Teater, recently elected to the Board 
of Control for a period of four years be- 
ginnning July 1, 1960, and representing Sec- 
tions 7 and 8 respectively. 

President Williamson stated that consider- 
ation of the proposals was the next order of 
business. 

Clinton B. Hammons moved, seconded by 
Russell Below, that Proposal I, providing 
that the exemption given in the last sentence 
of By-Law 37 shall apply only to full time 
boarding students, be adopted. The motion 
was carried. 

Chester C. Redmon moved, seconded by 
Arthur Mullins, that Proposal H, providing 
that "nineteenth" be substituted for "twen- 
tieth" in By-Law 4 be amended with the 
effective date being changed from July 1, 
1961, to July 1, 1962. The motion failed to 
carry. Glenn B, Smith moved, seconded by 



W. L. Miracle, that Proposal H as stated 
originally be adopted. The vote was as fol- 
lows: "Aye", 21; "No", 41. 

Robert B. Hensley moved, seconded by 
Dan L. Sullivan, that Proposal III, amending 
By-Law 3 for clarification, be adopted. The 
motion was. carried. 

John Heber moved, seconded by George 
Claiborne, that Proposal IV, providing that 
By-Law 26 requiring an official who is con- 
nected with a competing school to notify 
the opposing school of his intent to officiate 
the game at least fifteen days before the 
playing of the game, be tabled. The motion 
was carried. 

John Heber moved, seconded by Joe Mc- 
Pherson, that Proposal V, providing a penalty 
for an official connected with a competing 
school, who does not notify the opposing 
school of his intent to officiate the particu- 
lar game at least fifteen days before the 
game, be tabled. The motion was carried. 

Clinton B. Hammons moved, seconded by 
Robert B. Hengley, that Proposal VI, provid- 
ing that By-L"aw 37 be amended by adding 
"for boys from states other than Kentucky," 
be tabled. The motion was carried. 

There being no further business. President 
Williamson declared the meeting adjourned. 

The dinner meeting of the Association was 
held in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown 
Hotel at 6:00 P. M., with approximately 550 
delegates and other school officials present. 
Recipient of the Game Guy Award was Paul 
Kingrey of Glasgow, a boy who has overcome 
epilepsy to become one of Glasgow's few 4- 
letter men. The presentation of the award 
was made by Bob Kirchdorfer, the winner of 
the first Game Guy Award, which was given 
in 1949. 

Dr. Adron Doran, President of Morehead 
State College and the Kentucky Press As- 
sociation's "Outstanding Kentuckian of the 
Year," gave the address of the evening. Dr. 
Doran, a former high school coach and prin- 
cipal, was in a reminiscent mood, and his 
stories and philosophy of education were en- 
joyed thoroughly by those who attended the 
meeting. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



MAY, 1960 



VOL. XXII— NO. 10 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hieh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones, (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1958-62) Franklin; Jack Dawson (1958-62). Louisville; Robert 
P. Forsythe (1959-63), Greenville: K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), 
Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



^rom the Commisscone'i s Cjffl 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1959-60 Basketball Participation list 
(Eligibility). 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials. 

3. Official's Report on Schools — Basket- 
ball. 



State Track Committee 

The State Hig'h School Track Meet, sche- 
duled to be held in Lexington on May 20-21, 
will be managed by William McCubbin of the 
U. K. Physical Education staff. Other mem- 
bers of the committee are: Preston Holland. 
Murray ; George Claiborne, Owensboro ; Tur- 
ner Elrod, Bowling Green; Scott Smith, Ft. 
Knox; Eddie Weber. Louisville; Joe Curt- 
singer. Louisville; Bill McCubbin, Lexington; 
John Schaar. Bellevue ; Joe Brummett, Dan- 
ville; Herb Tye. Barbourville ; Arthur Mul- 
lins, Elkhorn City; Ernie Chattin. Ashland. 
These regional managers will assist Mr. Mc- 
Cubbin in conducting the State Meet. 

Fines for Late Reports 

More than 150 member schools had not 
filed their reports on basketball officials 
and their basketball participation ("eligibil- 
ity) lists for the 1959-60 season when this 
issue of the ATHLETE went to press. Some 
400 basketball officials have not filed their 
reports on member schools. The Boai'd of 
Control has established a fine of $5.00 for 
both schools and officials delinquent with 
their reports. A deadline of June 15 has 
been set for the f ilinc^ of all reports required 
under Association rules. Officials who have 
not worked any games should notify the 
K.H.S.A.A. office accordingly. Such notifica- 
tion is considered a report. 

Golf Tournaments 

The eight regional golf tournaments, the 
sites of which were given in the April issue 



of the ATHLETE, will be managed by the 
following men ; Ath. Dir. Fred Clayton, Cald- 
well County High School; Athletic Director 
Elvis Donaldson, Bowling Green High 
School : Ass't Principal Ed Binford, Shawnee 
High School ; Ass't Prin. Oz Johnson, Valley 
High School ; Athletic Director Ralph Car- 
lisle, Lafayette High School; Mr. Julian 
Pitzer, Middlesboro; Supt. Oran Teater, 
Paintsville City Schools; and Mr. Walter 
Baulch, Holmes High School. The State Golf 
Tournament will be held at Ft. Knox on May 
23-24, and will be managed by Coach John 
Hackett of the Ft. Knox High School. Prin- 
cipals who have not received their entry 
blanks should write to their respective man- 
agers for these forms. 

Tennis Tournaments 

Six regional tournaments for boys will be 
held in tennis this year. There will be two 
tournaments for the Louisville and Jeffer- 
son County schools, both managed by Coach 
Emmet Goranflo of the Eastern High School. 
The other four tournaments will be managed 
by Coach Ted Hornback of Bowling Green, 
Coach Eugene Huff of Lexington, Coach 
Roger Klein of Bellevue, and Coach Scott 
Smith, of Ft. Knox. The State Tennis Tour- 
nament will be held in Louisville on May 
16-17, and will be managed by Coach Goran- 
flo. 

By the time this issue of the ATHLETE 
comes from the press, five regional tennis 
tournaments for girls will have been con- 
ducted. These tournaments were scheduled to 
be managed by Miss Robye Anderson, Bowl- 
ing Green; Miss Margaret Sheegog, Louis- 
ville ; Roger Klein, Bellevue ; Miss Mary Rose 
Branstetter, Jefferson County ; and Gene 
Huff, Lexington. The State Tennis Tourna- 
ment for Girls will be held at Shawnee Park, 
Louisville, on May 13-14. This tournament 
will be managed by Miss Betty Langley. 
Bowling Green. She will be assisted by Miss 
Sheegog and Victor F. Williams of Louisville. 

Attention, Principals! 

More than one hundred principals of K.H.- 
S.A.A. member schools have not as yet filed 
requests this school year for their insurance 
subsidies. If the school is underwriting all 
or a part of insurance protection for its ath- 
letes, the Board of Control will allow a maxi- 
mum credit or refund of $30.00 to each school 
for "all sports except football," and an ad- 
ditional credit or refund of $30.00 to each 
school maintaining a football team. Princi- 
pals of schools which qualify for the credit 
or refund should write for reimbursement 
forms at once. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



Page Three 



1960 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, Class B, April 2, I960 

TEAM SCORING— Class "B" 



TEAM 






Highlands 

Trinity 

Ft. Knox 

Bellevue 

Covington Catholic 

Beechwood 

Foundation 

Kentucky Military Inst. 

Frankfort 

University 

St. Joseph 

Danville 

Irvine 



6 

7 

31/2 









31/2 

2 





I 



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O 4-J 



HO^ 



61/2 

7 





IV2 





4 

3 



391/2 
58 

181/2 

17 
121/2 

9 

8 

71/2 

5 



CLASS "B" 

RESULTS 
I. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Knapp, Highlands 
( :26.8) ; Seay, University ( :28.2) ; Switz- 
er. University ( :32.4) ; Williams, High- 
lands (:35,8); Smith, Bellevue ( :42.7J 
Wells. Irvine ( :44.2). 

Heat No. 2 : Koltak, St. Joseph 
( :27.5) ; Buckland, Foundation ( :29.2) 
Toombs, Trinity ( :29.8) ; Peters, St. Jos- 
eph {:31.4); Trunnell, Highlands ( :33.2) 
Wiseman, Irvine (:40.4). 

Heat No. 3 ; Chase, Frankfort ( :26.0) 
Mudd, Trinity ( :27.4) ; Richard. Ft 
Knox ( :27.7) ; Sullivan, Frankfort 
(:28.1); Rhein, Bellevue {:28.9); Smith, 
Foundation (:33.4). 

Heat No. 4 : Ferrell, Ft. Knox 
( :26.8) ; Kingsbury, Beechwood ( :28.2) 
Reeves, University ( :28.4) ; Hellman, Co\ 
Catholic ( :29.6) ; Williamson, Foundation 
(:34.0); Cheshire, Frankfort ( :36.6). 

Heat No. 6 : Herrlinger, K.M.I. ( :25. 
Miner, Beechwood ( :27.4) ; Ross, St. , 
eph (:30.1); Flynn, Irvine {:38.6); Mil 
ler, Irvine (:46.4). 

Heat No. 6: Pohlman, Trinity 
( :24.9) ; Grossman, Foundation ( :27.8) 
Gosney, Danville ( :30.1) ; Kreamer, Dan- 
ville ( :30.6) ; Pitzer, Bellevue ( :30.5) 
Cole, University (:34.7). 

Heat No. 7 : Fulmer, Highlands 
(:25.0); Jackson, Danville ( :27.4) 
Reusch, Cov. Catholic ( :27.9) ; Thornburg, 
St. Joseph ( :28.9) ; Jackson, Danville 
(:31.2). 

Finals 

1. Pohlman, Trinity :24.9 

2. Fuller, Highlands :26.1 



3. Ferrell, Ft. Knox :25.7 

4. Herrlinger, K.M.I. :26.7 

6, Chase, Frankfort :26.4 

6. Knapp, Highlands :27.0 

Pohlman set a new state record in 
this event with his time of :24.9. 

2. 100 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Call, Ti-inity (1 :12.3) ; 
Monohan, Trinity (1:17.8); Davis, K.M.I. 
(1:20.5): Dawson, Beechwood (1:23.9); 
Rothe, St. Joseph (1:33.1); Litteral, Ir- 
vine (1:48.8). 

Heat No. 2: Fulmer, Highlands 
(1 :11.8) : Bolizar, Ft. Knox (1 :16.1) ; 
Armstrong, University (1:24.3); Horn, 
Danville (1:35.6) ; Shearer, Irvine (2:32.6). 
Heat No. 3 : Conners, Highlands 
(1:11.7); Boeh, Bellevue (1:14.3); Rettig, 
Beechwood (1:19.6); Yang, Foundation 
(1:23.0); Grayson, Cov. Catholic (1:26.4); 
Hill, Highlands (1:27.3). 

Heat No. 4 : Dorsey, Highlalnds 
(1:09.7); Wade, University (1:15.6); 
Roeding, Cov. Catholic (1:16.6); Hein, 
Cov. Catholic (1:31.2); Hensley, Danville 
(1:37.1). J, J 

Finals 

Dorsey, Highlands 1:09.4 

Fulmer, Highlands 1:11.8 

Call, Trinity 1:12.0 

Conners, Highlands 1 :12.8 

Boeh, Bellevue 1 :14.7 

Bolizar, Ft. Knox 1:17.9 

Dorsey set a new statb recoi-d in this 
event with his time of 1:09.4. 

3. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Hayden, Trinity (1 :22.9) ; 
Beckman, Trinity (1 :24.4) ; Clark, Ft. 
Knox (1:27.0); Fegan, Ft. Knox (1:33.2); 
Richardson, Irvine, Disqualified ; Powell, 
Irvine, Disqualified. tj 



Heat No. 2: Hoskins, Trinity (1:19.6) ; 
Boone, Highlands (1 :20.7) ; Nelson, K. 
M.I. (1:26.2); Suetholz, Cov. Catholic 
(1:31.3); Shier, University (1:32.0); Shea, 
St. Joseph (1:41.3). 

Heat No. 3 : Cavana, Bellevue 
(1 :18.4) ; Stambaugh, Highlands (1 :23.5) ; 
Black, Highlands (1:27.0); Weber, (Cov. 
Catholic (1 :42.5) ; Bnodgrass, Founda- 
tion (1:43.6); Neikirk, Irvine (2:01.5). 

Heat No. 4 : Stivers, Highlands 
(1:19.9); Ray, Ft. Knox (1:24.8); Wirtz, 
St. Joseph (1:45.8); Wharton, Beechwood 
(1:50.5); Wade, University, Disqualified; 
Gander, Danville, Disqualified. 

Heat No. 6 : Panther, Trinity 
(1:15.6); Chase, Frankfort (1:23.7); 
Islam, Ft. Knox (1:24.2); GaJligan, 
K.M.I. (1:28.6); Wirtz, St. Joseph, 
(1:58.0). 

Finals 

1. Panther, Trinity 1:14.6 

2. Cavana, Bellevue 1:18.8 

3. Hoskins, Trinity 1:19.9 

4. Boone, Highlands 1 :21.1 

5. Stivers, Highlands 1 :21.B 

6. Hayden, Trinity 1:24.6 

Panther set a new state record in 

this event with his time of 1 :14.6. 

4. 100 Yard Freestyle- 
Heat No. 1 : Bootes, Highlands 

(1:00.8); Hellman, Cov. Catholic (1:01.5); 

Sullivan, Frankfort (1:05.8); Nichols, 

Foundation (1:13.0); Watson, Irvine 

(1:47.0). 

Heat No. 2 : Sullivan, Frankfort 

(1:01.9); Goodwin, Trinity (1:03.2); 

Herchede, St. Joseph (1:04.8); Reeves, 

University (1:08.5); Vollete, K.M.I. 

(1:10.0); Sanders, Danville (1:18.0). 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



Heat No. 3 : McKenzie, Highlands 
(1:04.1); Sund, Gov. Catholic (1:07.6): 
Dawson. Beechwood (l:ie.4) Powell, 
Irvine (1:40.71. 

Heat No. 4: Brink. Ft. Knox (1:02.5) ; 
Wallace, Ft. Knox (1:06.2); Auge, Beech- 
wood (1:24.1): Hankin, Danville (1:34.1). 

Heat No. 5: Reik, Highlands (:57.8); 
Herrlinger, K.M.I. (:58.0); Smith, Foun- 
dation (1:06.7); Gurnee, University 
(1:09.4); Miller, Irvine (2:03.0). 

Heat No. 6 : Meredith, Trinity ( :57.6) ; 
Gambill, University (1:07.9); Shaw, 
Trinity (1:11.3); Madigan, St. Joseph 
(1:32.4); Hoover, Irvine (2:17.6). 
Finals 

1. Meredith, Trinity :57.0 

2. Reik, Highlands :57.1 

3. Herrlinger, K.M.I. :B8.6 

4. Sullivan, Frankfort 1 :00.2 

5. Hellman, Covington Catholic — 1 :01.3 

6. Bootes, Highlands 1:01.3 

Meredith set a new state record in this 

event with his time of :57.0. 
5. Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

1. Cavana, Bellevue 191.20 

2. Glass, Highlands 183.60 

3. Roberts. Foundation 164.10 

4. Adair. Beechwood 164.95 

5. Keitz, Highlands 152.65 

6. Rieskamp, Covington Catholic— 147.50 

7. Morris, Frankfort 147.35 



6. 200 Yard Medley Relay — 

Heat No. 1 : Highlands (Dorsev, Stiv- 
ers, Stambaugh, Knapp) 2:06.8: Coving- 
ton Catholic (Roeding, Suetholz, Hellman. 
Reusch) 2:11.2; St. Joseph (Tekulve, 
Herschede, Thornburg. Koltak l 2:18.3; 
Beechwood (Rettig, Wharton. Allen. 
Pierce) 2:25.6: Foundation (Roberts. A. 
Yang, S. Yang, Nichols) 2:26.0: Irvine, 
(Litteral, Bush, Stokes, Shearer! 3:11.8. 

Heat No. 2: Trinity (Monohan. Pan- 
ther, Godwin, Finnegan) 2:02.9: Ft. Knox 
(Boldizar, Isham, Bedzyk, Rayl 2:10.7; 
University (Armstrong, Shier. Wade. 
Seay) 2:16.3; K.M.I. (Davis, Alligan. Nel- 
son. Vollette) 2:20.4; Danville I Horn, 
Gander, Hensley, Jackson) Disqualified. 
Finals 

1. Trinity (Monohan, Panther, 
Goodwin, Finnegan) 2:01.9 

2. Highlands (Dorsey, Stivers, 
Stambaugh, Knapp) 2:09.7 

3. Covington Catholic (Roeding. 

Suetholz, Hellman Reusch) 2:12.5 

4. Ft. Knox (Belizar, Isham, 

Bedzyk. Ray) 2:12.!) 

5. University (Armstrong, Shier. 
Wade, Seay) 2:14.5 

6. St. Joseph (Tekulve, Herschede. 

Thornburg, Koltak) 2:18.0 

Trinity set a new state record in this 
event with the time of 2:01.9. 



7. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay- 
Heat No. I : Highlands. (McKenzie, 
Boots. Re-k. Fulmerl 1:45.7: Ft. Knox 
(Sipple, Henfion, Loughne, Wuilleumer) 
1:49.5; Beechwood (Kingsburg, Miner, 
Allen. Pierce) 1:61.8; St. Joseph (Ross 
Peters. Shea, McGlnnisI 2:04.9; Bellevue 
'Snple. Henschen, Loughnan. Ward) 
2:12.3: Irvine (Brackett, Flynn, Watson, 
Gould) 2:30.1. 

Heat No. 2: Trinity (Pohlman. Mudd, 
Finnegan, Mered.th) 1:42.6; Founda- 
fon (Sm'th. McCary. Buckland. Gross- 
man I 1:55.7; Covington Catholic (Hell- 
man. Rice. Sund. Rteiskamp I 1:56.6; 
Frankfort (Cornelius. D. Morris. C. Morris, 
H. Sullivan I 2:00.2; Danville (Sanders, 
Weissinger, Kreamer. Jackson I 2:02.8: 
University (Gurnee, Gambill, Cole, Switz- 
erl 2: JO. a. 

Finals 

1. Tr'nity (Pohlman. Mudd, 
Finnegan, Meredith) 1:42.1 

2. Highlands iMcKenize. Bootes, 

Reik, Fulmerl 1:45.5 

3. Ft. Knox (Richards, Brink, 
Wallace. Ferrell ) 1:48.8 

4. Beechwood (Kingsbury, Miner, 
Allen, Piercel 1:51.7 

5. Foundation (Smith, McCray, 

Buckland, Grossman) 1:55.2 

Trinity set a new state record in this 

event with the time of 1:42.1. 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Boar(3 of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Friday morn- 
ing, April 22, 1960. The meeting was caWeA 
to or(Jer by President Russell Williamson at 
10:00, -with all Board members except W. H. 
Crowdus; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford 
and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield 
present. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Jack 
Dawson, that the reading of the minutes 
of the March 18th meeting be waived, since 
the members of the Board had received copies 
of these minutes. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a brief report on 
State Tournament receipts and expenses. He 
stated that total receipts would approximate 
$132,000.00, and he estimated that profit 
to the Association would be a figure close 
to $91,000.00. 

There was a discussion of possible re-dis- 
tricting in basketball. W. B. Jones moved, 
seconded by Jack Dawson, that McKell and 
South Portsmouth be moved from Basket- 
ball District 64 to Basketball District 63 for 
the 1960-61 school year. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Jack Daw- 
son, that action by the Board on the selec- 
tion of the State Basketball Tournament 
site for 1961 be deferred until the next meet- 
ing of the Board, which is subject to call by 
President Williamson, the tentative date 
was carried unanimously. 



The Commissioner presented a request of 
the State Swimming Committee that the 
committee be authorized by the Board of 
Control to set up a Swimming Achievement 
Award, to be known as the M. J. Cavana 
Memorial, the award to be presented annually 
to the K.H.S.A.A. member school whic'h has 
shown the most achievement in swimming 
during a twelve months period. The Commis- 
sioner stated that the committee proposes a 
point system covering six items, based on 
the percentage of student body achievement 
in each item ; and that a winner and runner- 
up trophy or award had been suggested by 
the committee. He recommended that the 
Board accept the recommendation of the 
State Swimming Committee, and that the 
committee be authorized to put the pro- 
posed plan into effect. Jack Dawson moved, 
seconded by W. B. Jones, that the recom- 
mendation of the State Swimming Commit- 
tee and the Commissioner with respect to 
the establishing of the M. J. Cavana Me- 
morial award be approved, and that the com- 
mittee be authorized to put the plan into 
effect. The motion was carried unanimously. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Cecil A. 
Thornton, that the summer meeting of the 
Board be held at Kenlake Hotel, Hardin, 
Kentucky, on July 29-30. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by K. G. 
Gillaspie, that Cecil A. Thornton be named 
the delegate to the forthcoming summer 
meeting of the National Federation. The 
motion was carried unanimously. W. B. Jones 
moved, seconded by Louis Litchfield, that 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



Page Five 



K. G. Gillaspie be named the alternate dele- 
gate to the National Federation summer 
meeting. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by W. B. 
Jones, that all bills of the Association be- 
ginning March 18, 1960, and ending April 
21, 1960, be allowed. 

There being no further business, the meet- 
ing adjourned. 



1959-60 ANNUAL REPORT 

(Presented to Delegate Assembly) 

Four hundred forty-four schools joined 
the Association during 1959-60. This is nine 
less than were enrolled in 1958-59. One hun- 
dred forty-six schools had eleven-man foot- 
ball teams, and twelve played eight-man foot- 
ball. This is an increase of two eleven-man 
teams over 1958-59. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen reg- 
ional basketball tournament managers show 
total receipts of $89,484.84, a decrease of 
some $27,000 over comparable figures for the 
preceding season. Receipts from the sixty- 
four district basketball tournaments amount- 
ed to $157,368.22, a decrease of $44,000 from 
the 1958-59 receipts. Receipts from ticket 
sales at the State Basketball Tournament 
were $126,977.00 and additional receipts 
from radio, television, and the tournament 
program will bring total tournament receipts 
to approximately $132,000.00. Profit to the 
Association on the tournament should ap- 
proximate $91,000.00. A few tournament 
bills are still being received by the State Of- 
fice, with the result that it is necessary to 
give an estimate of tournament profits at 
this time. A complete record of all receipts 
and disbursements will appear in a subse- 
quent issue of the Association magazine. 

One thousand one hundred seventy-seven 
basketball officials and 422 football officials 
registered with the Association in 1959-60. 
Nine football rules clinics were held under 
the direction of Edgar McNabb, and forty- 
seven football officials took the National 
Federation examination for the higher 
ratings. Of this number, seven were added 
to the "certified" list, and twenty-six to the 
"approved" list. Charlie Vettiner, veteran 
trainer of officials, conducted fifteen basket- 
ball clinics, and held the School for Basket- 
ball Officials. Additional meetings and clinics 
were held by the regional representatives 
who continue to render a fine service to the 
officials and schools in their respective areas. 



Fifty-five officials took the National Federa- 
tion basketball examination, with fourteen 
being added to the "certified" list and thirty 
receiving the "approved" rating. 

Five schools have been suspended from 
the Association this year, and five others 
have been placed on probation. All suspens- 
ions and probations came as a result of the 
violation of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17, Practice 
of Sportsmanship. 

The fall of 1959 saw the K.H.S.A.A. in- 
augurate class championships in football. 
They were well received in all parts of the 
state, with interest in high school football 
in Kentucky apparently now at a new high. 
Many administrators and coaches believe that 
the football championships have great possi- 
bilities for the futui'e. 

There is a continuing interest in minor and 
spring sports. Regional cross country runs 
were held in Paducah, Bowling Green, Clark- 
son, Louisville, Bellevue, Berea and Paints- 
ville on October 31 for the purpose of qualify- 
ing teams and individuals for the state event, 
which was held in Lexington on November 
14. Nine schools sent entries to the Class 
A Section of the State Swimming Meet, held 
in Lexington on February 27. Thirteen 
schools sent entries to the Class B Sec- 
tion of the State Swimming Meet, held 
in Lexington on April 2. One hundred sixty- 
nine K.H.S.A.A. member schools have in- 
dicated that they will send teams to the 
twelve regional track meets. Forty-nine dis- 
trict tournaments have been set up for base- 
ball, to accommodate the 300 teams which 
will enter the tournament. Seventy-two 
schools will have golf teams this spring, and 
these teams will enter eight regional tourna- 
ments to qualify for the State Golf Tourna- 
ment. Fifty-three boys' tennis teams will be 
entered in six regional tennis tournaments. 
For the first time the Association will spon- 
sor a State Tennis Tournament for Girls. In- 
terest in this state event appears to be great, 
and it will probably be necessary to set up 
four or five regional tournaments for the 
purpose of qualifying state entries in this 
sport. 

1959-60 has been another year of progress 
for the Association. Representatives of mem- 
ber schools have cooperated to the fullest 
when asked to assist in the various activities 
of the Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation. The Board of Control and the Com- 
missioner appreciate this teamwork very 
much. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



The Flying Dutchman 

When Paul Kingrey, the Glasgow Game 
Guy, received the 1960 award from Bob 
Kirchdorfer, the first winner in 1949, 
another milestone was passed in Kentucky's 
effort to help inspire the physically handi- 
capped. 

Since 1949 every Game Guy Award winner 
has been an excellent example for the young 
athletes of the Commonwealth to pattern 
from. Somebody has to devote time to kids 
carrying heavier burdens than many adults 
could handle. Somebody has to put his arm 
around a kid and say, "Look, son, at the 
record made by President Franklin Roose- 
velt who was handicapped physically in the 
same manner the first Game Guy winner is. 
Don't feel sorry for yoursellf. Pull yourself 
up by your bootstraps and start playing 
ball." Kentucky's coaches are doing more of 
this every year, and it must please "The 
Man Upstairs" mightily. 

Take Bob Kirchdorfer, the first winner, 
paralyzed from his waist down since the 
age of three ! Since completing his athletic 
exploits in school, he chose the Field of Rec- 
reation as his life's work. Today, he super- 
vises one-third of the recreation in the 
nationally acclaimed Jefferson County rec- 
reation Program at a handsome salary. The 
Game Guys keep marching on, making some 
of our adult "cry-babies" look very juvenile. 

The Dutchman missed the presentation of 
the award and his first K.H.S.A.A. banquet 
since food was discovered. It was the old 
story of business before pleasure. The 
Dutchman was working on a project which 
would make Louisville's massive downtown 
arena. The Armory, available to schoolboy 
and college sports. The mission has been 
accomplished. The Armory will become 
beautiful! Its renovation will cost a half- 
million dollars. It will have a new name, 
and will be available for Kentuckiana teams 
under the direction of The Flying Dutchman. 

Louisville's Hospitality Committee, head- 
ed by Bill Moore and The Dutchman, is grate- 
ful for the multitude of compliments it has 
received for efforts expended in making the 
school kids and adults happy in Louisville 
during the state tournament. If you want 
to know how much it cost, let's examine the 
record ! 

Exclusive of what the Louisville Chamber 
of Commerce and The University of Louis- 




1^; .'^^ 



/■ 




The Dutchman 

ville spent on the Coaches' and Principals' 
Social Room at Freedom Hall, The Louisville 
Chamber of Commerce laid $678.55 on the 
line. Actually, $932.20 was our total cost, 
but $253.65 was taken in at the downtown 
dances where the youngsters paid two bits 
each night to dance to a top-notch band. 

Our salute of the month goes to Commis- 
sioner Ted Sanford for the honor recently 
won when he was elected President of the 
State Tuberculosis Association. That's great 
work, Ted ! Please find the Dutchman's 
check for five bucks attached to help with 
this humanitarian work. 

In the realm of honors, R. C. Hinsdale, 
principal of Simon Kenton High School, nom- 
inates Printes Jones for next year's Game 
Guy Award. A lionheart lapel button is on 
its way to this seventh grade youngster 
from Independence for "whipping" Cerebral 
Palsy. 

Charlie Kolosa called for a Corn Cob Pipe 
of Honor for Jim McAfee for service to 
schoolboy sports while Ralph Welch said 
that Owenton's Cy Greene had taught his 
kids the lessons of sportsmanship, good man- 
ners and high morals so well that he should 
have a Cob Pipe for his trophy case. Jim 
and Cy have the awards and the respect of 
all Kentuckians. 

As the Dutchman signs "Thirty" to this 
last article of the 1959-1960 athlete year, 'he 
looks to next year with this thought in mind: 
The best thing about the future is that it 
comes one day at a time. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



Page Seven 



Arnold Goes National 

David C. Arnold joined the staff of the 
National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations on April 1, 1960. 

After a survey of the nation's leaders in 
school athletic administration, Dave was 
unanimously chosen by the Executive Com- 
mittee as Assistant Executive Secretary. 
The Executive Committee of the Michigan 
High School Athletic Association regretfully 
accepted his resignation as Assistant State 
Director of High School Athletics but gen- 
erously, and with pardonable pride, released 
him as another of Michigan's many contri- 
butions to a forward looking and progressive 
nation-wide program. 

Dave is a native of Kalamazoo, Michigan, 
where he attended public schools. At Kala- 
mazoo Central High School he played center 
on the basketball team which won the State 
Class A basketball championship in 1932. 
Following graduation from high school he 
matriculated to Western Michigan Univers- 
ity, where he competed in both basketball 
and baseball. He was one of the nation's 
finest collegiate basketball players during 
the 1935-36-37 seasons and was a standout 
pitcher on the baseball team during the same 
years. During his senior year he was Presi- 
dent of the University Student Council and, 
at the time f)f graduation, was named by the 
faculty as the outstanding male member of 
the 1937 graduating class. 

Following graduation he played profes- 
sional baseball in the New York Yankee's 
system, pitching at Norfolk, Nebraska and 
Amsterdam., New York during the 1937 and 
1938 seasons, respectively. He served as 
Principal and Athletic Director at Barryton, 
Michigan High School and later as Coach of 
football, basketball and baseball at Otsego, 
Michigan High School. During the summer 
months he was the Otsego City Recreation 
Director and later the Athletic Director and 
Head Coach of all sports at University High 
School, Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

Mr. Arnold served 39 months in the armed 
forces during World War II, 18 of which 
were spent in sea duty. He was a member 
of the Coast Guard assigned to the Navy's 
Anti-Submarine Warfare Service. Some of 
his service was spent at the Coast Guard 
Academy in which he served as a Director 
in the Physical Fitness Program. After his 
discharge in 1946, he returned to University 
High School in Kalamazoo as Coach and 
Athletic Director. 



In August, 1946 he accepted the appoint- 
ment of Assistant State Director of High 
School Athletics in Michi5an and has served 
continuously in that capacity until he joined 
the National Federation staff. 

Dave has a special interest in the rules of 
athletic games and will devote most of his 
efforts to this area. He is experienced and 
familiar with rules work, having worked 
with them for a number of years in the 
Michigan State office. He will also supervise 
Federation programs in experimentation and 
research in athletics. He will be available 
for conducting rules interpretation meetings 
and officiating mechanics meetings and will 
assist in editing the Federation publications. 



The Finest Indoor Track 

by George Gibson, President 
Kentuckiana Cinder Club, Inc. 

Would you like to see the mile run under 
four minutes for the first time indoors? 
Wouldn't it be a great inspiration to several 
hundred school and college athletes of our 
state to participate each winter in outstand- 
ing indoor track and field meets along with 
world champions ? You can have the satisfac- 
tion of helping bring this about. 

The finest indoor track in the world should 
be completed for an indoor meet of national 
importance next winter at the State Fair- 
grounds. The State Fair Board has $15,000 
on hand for construction of a sectional, 
wooden track for use in the Coliseum (Free- 
dom Hall). 

The Kentuckiana Cinder Club, Inc. is seek- 
ing $20,000 for its Track and Field Founda- 
tion Fund to cover the balance of the cost 
of the track and the initial operating ex- 
penses for the first meet. The Club is a 
non-profit corporation, gifts to which are 
tax-deductible. All contributions over $1 
will be acknowledged. The Club's address 
is 2115 Village Dr., Louisville 5. 

Track authorities agree that the track 
will be the outstanding one of its type. The 
oval will be 220 yards in length so that eight 
laps will constitute a mile. By contrast the 
tracks of this type in Madison Square Gar- 
den, the Boston Garden, Chicago, Milwaukee, 
Philadelphia and Cleveland are eleven or 
twelve laps to the mile. Naturally, the longer 
the tracks the better it is for the competit- 
ors and consequently the spectators. For 
example, the straight side sections of the 
track will be 166 feet in length compared to 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



102 feet on the eleven lap tracks. Also there 
will be a straightaway for a 100 yard dash 
through the center. The tracks in the other 
cities have dash straightaways of only 60 
or 70 yards. The runners use short spikes 
which give excellent footing in the soft wood 
of the track surfaces. The spikes are inter- 
changeable with the long spikes used in the 
shoes on cinder tracks. 

Several of the outstanding international 
performers have already indicated great in- 
terest in appearing on the track. Al Law- 
rence, the Australian student at Houston 
University, looked over the plans for the 
track and stated, "You'll break every record 
in the books on that !" Lawrence last winter 
set new world's records for both the two 
mile and three mile runs indoors. 

It is expected that the indoor track will 
give tremendous impetus to the continued 
growth of track and field athletics in the 
state. With the continually improving high- 
way system participants and spectators will 
be able to benefit from the track over a con- 
tinually wider area of the state. The Olym- 
pics this summer, which will be carried on 
television immediately following their run- 
ning, will spread knowledge of track and 
field athletics and their benefits. The Presi- 
dent's Committee on Physical Fitness is also 
stressing track and field athletics. 

Many physical education leaders are sup- 
porting the renewed emphasis on participa- 
tion in track. Their attitude is based on such 
factors as: 

1. Practically all young people can take 
part profitably ; 

2. The expense of equipment for the in- 
dividual participant is relatively small; 

3. The sport is basic to practically all 
other land sports, which all involve combina- 
tions of running, jumping and throwing; 

4. Large numbers can be accomodated in 
the sport with practically no necessity to 
eliminate participants because of lack of 
space ; 

5. It is practically injury-free; 

6. It is not a "terminal" sport; i.e. it is 
easy for the participants to carry on after 
their school years, even individually. 

Our wonderful Coliseum gives Kentucky 
and Kentuckians a great opportunity to take 
part in this development and to profit in 
every way from it. Help bring it about by 
sending your contributions to the Track and 
Field Foundation Fund. 



BASEBALL RULINGS 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
Ruling: SIO or his coach should report the sub- 
situation to the Chief Umpire by giving the name of 
SIO ,his shirt number, the name of the player he is 
replacing in the batting order and the position SIO 
will play in the field. (3-1-1) 

18. Play: The team in the field calls time a second 
time during the inning. The first time the coach had 
conferred with the pitcher, the second time he talks 
with the 1st baseman. 

Ruling: The pitcher must be replaced as the pitcher 
and he may not pitch during the remainder of the 
game but he can play any other position. (3-3-1-c) 

19. Play: Coach confers with pitcher once during 
the 2nd inning. During the 3rd inning coach comes 
to the mound to replace pitcher. During the 5th inning 
coach again confers with the pitcher. 

Ruling: It is not necessary to replace the pitcher 
in the 5th inning. The coach conference in 3rd inning 
during which the pitcher was replaced does not apply 
to total number of permissible conferences. (3-3-1-c) 

20. Play: With Rl on 2nd it is the batting turn of 
B2 but B3 erroneously bats in his turn. He hits a 
double which scores Rl. Before a pitch is delivered 
to the next batter the error is discovered. 

Ruling: Umpire declares B2 out and Rl must re- 
turn to 2nd. B3 then bats for himself. (7-1-1 and 
penalty) 

21. Play: Hit by Bl goes to center field fence and 
Bl advances to 3rd. After Fl has delivered one or 
more pitches to B2, F4 appeals that Bl did not touch 
2nd during his advance. 

Ruling: Appeal is ignored. Appeal will not be 
accepted unless Umpire's attention is called to it by 
a player of the offended team before the time of the 
next pitch. (2-11-6) 

22. Play: What is the time of the pitch for the: 
(a) windup; or (b) set position? 

Ruling: The time of the pitch occurs in (a) the 
instant the pitcher commits himself to deliver to the 
batter, i.e., when he starts his windup or pumping 
action. In (b) it is when the pitcher continues his de- 
livery after separating his hands. (2-9-1; 6-1-1, 2 
and 3) 

23. Play: During time called by F2, coach of field- 
ing team confers with Fl. Later in same inning he 
confers with F2. 

Ruling: Fl must be replaced as pitcher. (3-3-1-c; 
6-2-2-b) 

24. Play: With Rl on 1st, Fl, in set position, 
stretches and then steps toward and throws to 1st 
without coming to a stop. 

Ruling: Legal. Fl must hold the ball in both hands 
in front of his body for at least one second before 
a pitch but not before a throw to a base. (6-1-3) 

25. Play: After taking his position in the batter's 
box, Bl steps out of the box. 

Ruling: Unless the Umpire grants time, the pitch 
will be called a ball or strike if Bl steps out of his 
box after Fl has started his delivery. ('7-3-1 Note) 

26. Play: With one out and Rl on 3rd and R2 on 
2nd, B4 misses the 3rd strike which goes beyond the 
catcher and rolls to the screen. B4, thinking it is 
only the 2nd strike, does not run to 1st base but 
stays in the batter's box. Rl crosses home plate. R2 
also attempts to score but F2 throws to Fl, who 
tags Rl before he reaches the plate. Fl then tags B4. 

Ruling: Score by Rl does not count because the 
run cannot be scored if the runnner advanced to 
home base during a play in which the 3rd out is 
made on the batter before he reaches 1st base. 
(9-1-1-a) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



Page Nine 



27. Play: Bl hits a fair b3ll close to the right field 
foul line. While the ball is in fair territory F9 attempt- 
ing to catch the ball, deflects it from his glove into 
foul territory where it lands in the stands. 

Ruhng: Bl is awarded 2nd base and credited with 
a double. (8-3-2-c) 

28. Play: With no runner and a ball 2, strike 2 
count on the batter, Bl swings at and misses the 
next pitch. The pitch eludes the catches, hits against 
the Umpire's protector and rebounds into the diamond. 
Fl recovers the ball and throws to F3 at 1st base 
before Bl reaches the base. 

Ruling: Ball remains in play and Bl is out. (8-4-1-d) 

29. Play: With Rl on 1st, F2 tips the bat of B2 
who hits the ball weakly on the ground to Fl. The 
throw of Fl to 1st is over the head of F3 and goes 
into right field. Rl advances to 2nd and then to 3rd 
and tries to score. B2 goes to 2nd. F9 recovers the 
ball and throws to F2, who tags Rl before he touches 
home plate. 

Ruling: Rl is out and B2 remains on 2nd. (8-1-1-e) 

30. Play: Rl and R2 are on 2nd and 1st bases, 
respectively, with none out. B3 hits to F5 near 3rd 
base. F5 fields the ball, steps on 3rd base to retire 
Rl who interferes with F5, preventing a throw to 
2nd or 1st base for the double play. 

Ruling: Ball is declared dead by Umpire. B3 also 
is called out because, in the Umpire's opinion, inter- 
ference of F5 by Rl prevented a double play. R2 is 
placed back on 1st base. {8-4-1-g) 

31. Play: Rl and R2 are on 3rd and 1st bases, 
respectively, with 2 out. The pitcher commits a balk. 
He completes his pitch and the batter hits safely to 
right field. R2, who was on 1st base, misses 2nd base 
in rounding it to go to 3rd base. Rl advances to 
home. F4 procures the ball, steps on 2nd and ap- 
peals to the Umpire for a ruling on R2 who failed 
to touch 2nd base. 

Ruling: First of all, the balk is nullified because 
the batter hit safely and all runners advanced a min- 
imum of one base. In such a situation, as this, R2, 
who failed to touch 2nd base, is considered to have 
advanced the required one base. The Umpire shall 
allow the appeal and declare R2 out. This is the 3rd 
out and, since it results in a force play, no run can 
score. (6-2-4-Pen.) 

32. Play: The Coach of the team in the field re- 
quests time to confer with his players for their fourth 
conference in the game and, as a result, Fl must be 
removed as pitcher for the remainder of the game. 
SI pitches 3 balls to Bl, at which time, Coach again 
requests time to come on the field to confer with 
him (SI). Coach of the team at bat informs Umpire 
of Rule 3-1-2. 

Ruling: SI must be removed as pitcher for the 
duration of the game. Rule 3-3-1-c takes precedence 
over 3-1-2. (3-3-1-c) 

33. Play: It is the first half of the 1st inning with 
Bl at bat and none out. Fl has a count of 2 and 2 
on the batter. Next pitch of Fl is called ball 3 by 
the Umpire. Fl takes exception to the call and rushes 
toward home plate, using profanity. 

Ruling: Although the penalty indicates that Fl 
should be given a warning for first offense, the 
Umpire does have the authority to immediately odi-er 
him from the game and to leave the field if, in his 
opinion, the act of Fl is severe enough to warrant 
such penalty. (3-3-1-a) 

34. Play: Rl and R2 are on 3rd and 2nd, respect- 
ively, with one out. B4 attempts to bunt and pops 
ball into the air between the 3rd base line and the 
mound. Fl tries hard to catch the ball but he barely 
touches it with the tip of his glove and ball drops to 



the ground. His momentum carries him to the base 
path where he collides with Rl. F5 grabs the ball and 
tag:s Rl, who is stretched out on the ground. R2 
reaches 3rd safely and B4 advances to 1st. 

Ruling: Call obstructions on Fl and award Rl home 
base. Ball does not become dead at time of infraction. 
R2 and B4 were not affected by the obstruction and 
advanced at their own risk. (8-3-1-c) 

35. Play: Rl is on 2nd base and B2 hits ball to deep 
center field. Ball rolls past F8 who throws his glove 
and strikes it: (a) after B2 reached 1st base; or (b) 
before B2 reached 1st base. 

Ruling: In (a), award B2 home and, in (b), award 
B2 3rd base. (8-3-2-b; 8-3-3-1) 

36. Play: When a Coach or his representative re- 
quests time and comes on the diamond to confer with 
any player or players a second time in the same 
inning or the fourth time during the game, the 
pitcher must be removed from the mound. Does this 
count as charged conference? 

Ruling: Whenever the pitcher is removed from the 
game or from the mound because of the Penalty pre- 
scribed in Rule 3-3-1-c, a conference is not charged 
to his team. (3-3-1-c) 

37. Play: Rl and R2 are on 3rd and 2nd base, re- 
spectively. F2 sees R2 make a break for 3rd base 
and throws ball to F4, after which R2 is caught in a 
rundown between 2nd and 3rd bases. F5, while not 
having the ball, obstructs R2 while he is trying to get 
to 3rd base. Rl, who was on 3rd base, runs toward 
home but realizes that he cannot make it and goes 
back to 3rd base. 

Ruling: Award 3rd base to R2 and home base to 
Rl. (8-3-1-c and Note) 

38. Play: Bl opens the inning with a potential 
3-base hit, but fails to touch 1st base. Fl assumes 
his set position and, before he commits himself to 
pitch, the first baseman calls for the ball so he may 
make an appeal play at 1st base. Fl is slightly con- 
fused and commits a balk before throwing to F3. 
After Bl is awarded home base, may an appeal be 
made to 1st base? If so, does the run count? 

Ruling: The run does not count, since the appeal 
was made prior to the next pitch after Bl missed 
touching 1st base. (2-9-1; 2-11-6) 

39. Play: There are 2 out and B3 makes a potent- 
ial 3-base hit but misses 2nd base. Fl assumes his 
set stance and before he commits himself to pitch, 
the 2nd baseman calls for the ball so he may make 
an appeal play at 2nd base. Fl is befuddled and 
commits a balk but goes through with pitch to B4, 
who hits a home run inside the park. F4 obtains the 
ball, steps on 2nd base and appeals to the Umpire 
for ruling B3 missing 2nd base. 

Ruling: Both runs count. B3's run counts because 
the appeal was made after the next pitch following 
failure of B3 to touch 2nd base. (2-9-1; 2-11-6) 

40. Play: B3 lofts high fly ball to outfield. F7 backs 
up to fence and sees that ball is about to clear it. 
F7 tosses glove into air, deflecting ball enough to 
keep it from clearing barrier. 

Ruling: If the Umpire feels the act kept the ball 
from going over the fence, he shall award the batter 
a home run. (8-3-2-a) 

41. Play: With two out and Rl, R2 and R3 on 3rd, 
2nd and 1st, respectively, the count on B6 is 3 and 2. 
On the next pitch, B6 strikes out, missing the ball, 
which evades F2 and lodges in the mask of the 
Umpire. Before ball can be extracted, all thi'ee base 
runners cross home plate. , 

Ruling: The ball becomes dead as soon as it lodges 
in mask of Umpire. The batter is awarded 1st base 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



and all runners advance one base. Had there been 
less than 2 out and 1st base was occupied, the 
batter would have been out. (5-2-1-f) 

42. Play: Bl appears at home plate to bat with a 
Softball bat, which is 36 inches long and 2% inches 
in diameter and is made of hardwood. Coach of team 
in field asks Umpire to prohibit use of this bat claim- 
ing it is not legal equipment. 

Ruling: The Umpire allows use of this bat, since 
it is a smoothly rounded piece of hardwood with 
measurements within the prescribed rules limitations. 
(1-3-5) 

43. Play: In the first inning, the home team scores 
two runs and, during its turn at bat in the sixth 
inning, the visiting team scores six runs. A light 
rain begins to fall as the home team comes to bat 
during last half of the sixth inning. The first three 
batters reach base safely and with bases loaded B4 
hits a grand slam home run, tying the score 6 to 6. 
While B5 is at bat, the rain increases causing Umpire 
to call time and eventually call the game. What is 
the score? 

Ruling: The final score of game is 6 to 6. Had B4 
been retired, rather than hitting a home run with 
bases loaded and scoring four runs, his team would 
have been the winner, 2 to 0. (4-2-4-b) 

44. Play: Rl is on 1st base and B2 hits a sharp 
ground ball to F6 who throws ball to F4 to force 
Rl at 2nd base. F4 attempts throw to 1st base for a 
double play but ball disappears inside shirt of retired 
Rl. Rl did not attempt to interfere with the throw 
of F4. 

Ruling: Umpire should call time and declare the 
ball dead. The fact that Rl did not interfere signifies 
that it was an accident which caused ball to go inside 
his shirt. Rule 10-2-2-g makes it the duty of the 
Umpire-in-Chief to rule on points not covered by the 
rules. Bl reaches 1st base on the play. (10-2-2-g) 



Coaches Handbock 



First of its kind, the recently published 
COACHES HANDBOOK covers the varied 
administrative tasks of the interscholastic 
high school coach and ogives effective pro- 
cedures and practices based on the exper- 
iences of successful coaches. 

The 82-page handbook, originally publish- 
ed for Florida coaches and now revised, also 
makes clear the principles and ideals that 
hallmark a successful high school athletic 
program. 

The organization, financing and program 
of interscholastic athletics are thoroughly 
treated in the book, which also describes de- 
sirable relationships of the coach with the 
student body, the faculty, the community, 
and with other schools. 

Specific suggestions for working with 
news media form one of the most useful sec- 
tions of the book. Another part clarifies the 
nature of "liability" and the coach's respon- 
sibility for the safety of students. Special 
sections are given to equipment, facilities, 
and preparation for contests and awards. 
Sample forms and charts needed by the 
coach are included. 



The school administrator, as well as the 
athletic director, will find this book an in- 
dispensable guide in meeting the increasing 
demands made of the athletic department of 
today's school. 

Copies of the COACHES HANDBOOK may 
be obtained from AAHPER - NEA, 1201 Six- 
teenth Street, N.W., Washington 6, D.C. 
(1960, 82 pages, $1.50, with discounts: 2-9 
copies, 10 percent; 10 or more copies, 20 
percent.) 



U. K. All-Sports Clinic 

University of Kentucky's annual all-sports 
coaching school, conducted for the benefit of 
high school coaches of the state, will be held 
on the campus Aug. 10-13 with some of the 
top names in the collegiate coaching profes- 
sion as instructors. 

UK Athletic Director Bernie A. Shively 
announced that the traditional summer clinic 
will feature as fooball lecturers Head Coach 
Forest Evashevski of Iowa and Gomer Jones, 
line coach at Oklahoma under Bud Wilkerson 
for the past 13 years. Basketball discussions 
will be headed by Charles Osborn, coach of 
Bradley's NIT champions, plus Kentucky's 
Adolph Rupp and Assistant Coach Harry 
Lancaster, UK Fotball Coach Blanton Collier 
and his staff will be available for consulta- 
tions. 

In co-operation with the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association, the clinic also will 
have sessions on baseball, track and preven- 
tion-treatment of athletic injuries. Leading 
medical specialists of the state will take part 
in the latter phase of the program jointly 
sponsored by UK, the KHSAA and the State 
Medical Association. Dr. John Heldman, Uni- 
versity of Louisville, will head a panel of 
leading high school and college coaches in 
discussing baseball coaching, and Coach Ber- 
nie Sadosky, Highlands High School, Ft. 
Thomas, will be in charge of a track panel. 

The four-day coaching school begins Wed- 
nesday afternoon, Aug. 10 with baseball on 
the agenda. Track takes the spotlight for 
Thursday morning sessions followed by an 
afternoon devoted to basketball. The cage 
spot talks continue the next morning and 
football tips are scheduled to take up the 
afternoons of both Friday and Saturday. 
The medical clinic will be Saturday morning. 

Special features will include a dinner for 
attending coaches on Friday night and the 
annual Kentucky High School All-Star Games 
in football and basketball Saturday night. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



Page Eleven 



K. H. S. C. A. Meetings 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Held in Louisville, April 20, 1960 

The Executive Meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association was held at the Watterson 
Hotel in Louisville at 4:30 p.m. on April 20, 1960. 
The following members were present: John Hackett, 
retiring President; John Meihaus, President; Wallace 
Sydnor, Vice President; Joe Ohr, Secretary-Treasurer; 
Ralph Dorsey, Sgt.-at-Arms; Estill Branham, Manager 
of All-Star Games. 

The Committee accepted the resignation of Jim 
Ownby as Sgt.-at-Arms. Ownby has accepted a position 
outside the coaching field. The committee appointed 
Ralph Dorsey to fill the vacancy for 1960-1961. 

All-Star Manager, Estill Braham, discussed the feas- 
ibility of issuing each All-Star player two complimen- 
tary tickets for the game in which he was to partici- 
ipate. After much discussion the committee rejected 
the issuance of such tickets. 

The meeting adjourned at 5:15 P. M. 



Annual Business Meeting 
Held in Louisville, April 20, 1960 

The annual business meeting of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association was held April 20, 1960, 
at 7:30 P. M. in Parlor A of the Kentucky Hotel in 
Louisville. 

President John Meihaus opened the meting by wel- 
coming Commissioner Theodore Sanford, of the Ken- 
tucky High School Athletic Association, and President 
Russell Williamson, retiring president of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association. 

It was moved by Ralph McRight and seconded by 
Ralph Carlisle that the reading of the minutes of the 
1959 meeting be dispensed with, as they had been pub- 
lished in the Athlete, official magazine of the Ken- 
tucky High School Athletic Association. The motion 
carried. 

Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr reported to the assemb- 
ly the financial status of the Savings Account; the 
All-Star Account, and the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association Account. These reports were in 
the form of audits which are made annually. 

Two persons were nominated for the position of 
Sgt.-at-Arms. Ralph Carlisle was nominated by Ralph 
McRight and Joe Talley was nominated by Estill 
Branham. Talley was elected by the members in at- 
tendance. 

Joe Ohr was re-elected Secretary-Treasurer without 
opposition. The nomination was made by Ollie Leathers 
and seconded by Ralph McRight. 

Two of Kentucky's finest coaches were honored at 
the meeting. Ralph Carlisle of Lafayette High School, 
Lexington, Kentucky, was elected "Coach of the Year" 
in basketball by his fellow coaches, and Don Shelton 
was chosen "Coach of the Year" in football. Shelton 
guided the Henderson City eleven to the Class AA 
Championship of Kentucky. Shelton has recently been 
made Head Football Coach at Murray State College. 
Carlisle was introduced to the assembly by Coach 
Fred Allen, Atherton High School. Allen was a member 
of Carlisle's first Lafayette team. Paducah Tilghman 
football coach Ralph McRight introduced Coach Shelton 
to the group. 

The main speaker of the evening was Coach Guy 
Penney, Morehead State College, football mentor. 
Penney, in his first year at Morehead, was introduced 
by President John Meihaus. Penney remarked in talk 



stated, "Kentucky has furnished enough basketball 
players for the South but no enough football players 
for the Kentucky colleges." Penney listed ten principles 
of Coaching Philosophy of Morehead: They were: 
Morale, Tradition, Environment, Confidence, Schedul- 
ing, and SimpHcity. 

After Coach Penney's excellent and sometimes amus- 
ing talk about "Coaching Philosophy of Morehead," a 
report on the membership of the Association was 
made, with the report showing that the membership 
has reached a record high of 914 for 1959-1960. Prev- 
ious membership reports have shown: 1958-1959, 851; 
1957-1958, 748; 1956-1957, 720; 1955-1956, 739; 
1954-1955, 689; 1953-1954, 686. 

The officers for 1961-1962 are: President, Wallace 
Sydnor, Daviess County; Vice President, Ralph Dorsey, 
Caverna; Sec.-Treas., Joe Ohr, Irvine; Sgt-at-Arms, 
Joe Talley, Old Kentucky Home. 

The meeting adjourned at 9:10 P. M. 



Ky. Coaches Association 

Irvine, Ky. 
April 19, 1960 
Executive Committee 

Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen : 

In accordance with instructions from your sec- 
retary, Mr. Joe Ohr, I have made an examination of 
the records of your organization that were submitted 
to me by Mr. Ohr for the period March 3, 1959 thru 
February 1, 1960. 

The results of the various transactions during this 
period are shown on the accompanying schedule of 
Cash Receipts and Disbursements. The Isalance in the 
bank of $5,262.26 has been confivmed as being on de- 
posit in the Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, 
Kentucky, as of February 1, 1960. 

All receipts and disbursements as shown in the 
accompanying schedule appear to be correctly recorded 
and are properly substantiated by cancelled checks. 

In my opinion the schedule properly reflects the 
cash receipts and disbursements as recorded for the 
period shown, and all records are in neat and orderly 
fashion. 

Respectfully submitted, 
WILLIAM SEXTON, JR. Auditor 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIA- 
TION STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND 
DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 
3, 1959 THRU FEBRUARY 1, 1960 
RECEIPTS: 

Membership Dacs $ 914.00 

Total Receipts $ 914.00 

Plus: Banli Balance March 3, 1959 4,824.97 

TOTAL $ 5,738.97 

EXPENSES: 

Postage $ 24.00 

Audit of Books 17.00 

Delegate Expenses to KEA 25.00 

Coach of Year Awards 78.96 

Treasurer*s Bond 31.25 

All Star Headquarters Expense 131.52 

Expenses & Refunds - Joe Ohr 24.00 

Expenses to National Rules Meeting 137.68 

Filing Fee & State Tax 7.30 

Total Expense Disbursements $ 476.71 

BALANCE $5,262.26 

Balance in Union Bank & Trust Company, 

Irrine, Kentucky, on February 1, 1960 $ 5,262.26 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1960 



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Irvine, Ky. 

April 19, 1960 

Executive Committee 

East-West All Star Football & Basketball Games of 
Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Gentlemen: 

In compliance with instructions from your Secre- 
tary, Mr. Joe Ohr, I have examined the records of 
your organization submitted to me by Mr. Ohr for the 
period April 1, 1959 through February 26, 1960. 

The results of the transactions during the period 
are shown in the attached schedule of Cash Receipts 
and Disbursements. The balance of $14,16.5.82 in the 
All Star Account has been confirmed as being on 
deposit in the First National Bank & Trust Company, 
Lexington, Kentucky. 

The records disclose total receipts from the AU- 
Star Games Ticket sales as being $7,024.25 after ex- 
penses of ticket sellers and other expenses. Receipts 
from the sale of Programs amounted to $833.90, added 
to $7,024.25 giving Mr. Ohr a net deposit of $7,858.15. 
The expenses mentioned herein are properly covered 
by cash receipts. 

The total cash receipts of $7,858.15 agrees in 
amount with the deposits made in the First National 
Bank & Trust Company, Lexington, Kentucky. 

All receipts and disbursements as shown in the 
accompanying schedule appear to be correct and in my 
opinion this schedule presents correctly the cash re- 
ceipts and disbursements on the All Star Fund Ac- 
count for the period above stated and your Secretary 
is to be complimented on the fine manner in which 
these records are kept. 



In addition to the above balance, I have confirmed 
a balance of $3,731.68 in KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
COACHES ASSOCIATION SAVINGS ACCOUNT 
No. 9315 in the Columbia Federal Savings & Loan 
Association, Covington, Kentucky on April 18, 1960. 
Respectfully submitted, 
WILLIAM SEXTON, JR. Auditor 

EAST-WEST ALL STAR FOOTBALL AND 
BASKETBALL GAMES OF THE KENTUCKY 
HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION 
STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DIS- 
BURSEMENTS FOR THE PERIOD APRIL 1, 1959 
THROUGH FEBRUARY 26, 1960. 

RECEIPTS: 

Receipts from All Star Games $ 7,024.25 

Receipts from All Star Progrrams 833.90 

Total Receipts 7,858.15 

Pins: Bank Balance 4-1-59 $12,705.56 

TOTAL $20,563.71 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Change for All Star Games % 600.00 

Awards for All Star Players 1,467.40 

Photos 53.00 

Printing 321.74 

Manager & Coaches Salaries 1,900.00 

Traveling Expenses - Players 961.22 

Insurance 383.00 

Federal Tax on All-Star Games 641.40 

Misc. Travel, Postage & Telephone 70.13 

Total Disbursements _.$. 6,397.89 

BALANCE - $14,165.82 

Balance in Pint National Bank & Truit Co., 

Lexington, Kentncky, on Feb. 26, 1960 $14,16S.82 



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Just a note of thanks to our many friends who have made the 
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One thing that can add to your pleasure is to eliminate all worry about 
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A Personal Note 

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Coaches for the many orders you have placed with us during the past 
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